The Wood-Fired Blog

Fox Pizza Bus

How cool is this.

A Forno Bravo pizza oven in a double decker bus roaming the streets of Los Angles. Here is more from the Zagat Blog.

“It’s the creation of chef Michael Fox who, somehow, installed a Forno Bravo wood-burning pizza oven on the truck, which he uses to cook pizzas that he hand-tosses at parties and events – and hopefully, sometime in the future, at food truck get-togethers. In the meantime, he’s also offering cooking classes, where you and your friends can learn the fine art of pizza making. For info, go to www.foxpizzabus.com, e-mail info@foxpizzabus.com or call 818-305-4722.”

Photo courtesy of the Fox Pizza Bus

You can also check out the Fox Pizza Bus page on Facebook. These guys are busy. We will be adding them to our list of Wood-Fired Cooking Schools on www.fornobravo.com.

Pizza Making Should be Simple

This photo of Del Popolo Pizza a new wood-fired Food Truck in San Francisco from The Bend Bulletin really struck a cord with me. While the company has been getting a lot of attention in the press for, among other things, the sheer size of the food truck itself (it is based on a 14 ton, 20-foot shipping container that holds the pizza oven), what I like about this photo is how it captures the true nature of great pizza — and how simple it should be.

Photo by Nick Czap / The New York Times

Great dough, great tomatoes and cheese; a hot wood-fired oven; and of course some nice skill and techniques. Look at how uncluttered and calm this scene is.

Undergrad Takes on Food Truck at Cal

From the San Jose Mercury News.

Koh may be the first undergrad to run his own food truck at Cal, but street food fever is taking over not only cities, but also college campuses from coast to coast. Schools in Southern California, Texas, Oregon and Washington have launched their own versions of Off the Grid street food fests, bringing fleets of food trucks on campus. A trio of students at Bowdoin College in Maine launched a food truck in February. And law students in Pennsylvania have begun holding workshops for anyone interested in starting a food truck business of their own.

Photo from D. Ross Cameron/San Jose Mercury News

Exciting. There sure weren’t gourmet food trucks when I went to college (all those years ago).

Check out DoJo Dogs list of Asian Fusion Hotdogs:

Ninjitsu: A Dojo Dog dog topped with shredded nori, flash-grilled cabbage, teriyaki sauce and Japanese mayonnaise, in a hoagie-style bun.

Kendo: Bonito flakes, cabbage, soy paste and wasabi mayonnaise.

Wushu: Pork sung, cabbage, katsu sauce and Japanese mayonnaise.

Shaolin Monk: Lettuce, grilled cabbage and a miso glaze, wrapped in nori rather than a bun.

More Food Truck Numbers

From WCTV in Tallahassee—Food Truck Boom in Tallahassee.

They are riding the wave of the fastest growing business in Florida. According to Florida’s Department of Business and Professional Regulation, there are 60 food trucks registered in Leon County alone. That has more than doubled since 2008.

“It’s growing tremendously. Statewide in 2008 about 2500, now about 3,000 and we are seeing people embracing this new business model and they are reaching out, creating their dreams,” DBPR Secretary Ken Lawson said.

TJ’s Wood-Fired Pizza in SoCal

“Guide: Where to find daily food trucks lots” in the Orange County Register leads me to a Forno Bravo oven on a wood-fired catering trailer.

Sunday:

Where: OC Great Park Farmers Market, IrvineTime: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.Trucks: Crepes Bonaparte, Calbi, Barcelona on the Go, TJ’s Woodfire Pizza, Chomp Chomp, Rolling Sushi + 1-2 rotating trucks

Check out TJ’s Woodfire Pizza. That’s our oven!

Their Margherita Pizza was voted in the top “50 Best Dishes in Orange County” through Orange Coast Magazine! These guys makes a great pizza.

 

Have Food Trucks Gone Too Far?

I got a real kick out of this first-class rant by Los Angeles public radio commentator and performer Sandra Tsing Loh.

This comes from www.altadeno.patch.com. It’s just true and funny. It reminds me of the “beer flavored beer” ads that featured Denis Leary.

Tsing Loh’s radio piece, which aired on Pasadena’s KPCC station can be heard here, or you can read a transcript of the piece.

Her complaints included:

God bless my native city of Los Angeles, and its pulsing norteno reggaeton beat, but I think sometimes there can be TOO much hipness, TOO much multiculturalism, TOO much blending. Do we really NEED a Korean Mexican short rib minicrepe with mandarin oranges and coconut shavings with a side of jicama slaw marinated in Red Bull, handed through a tiny window by a tattooed Cal State Northridge student who’s reading a book on French symbolism and charging three dollars for smart water? I mean how smart is our smart water supposed to be? If it was that smart, I wouldn’t ALSO be trying the kimchi on a stick.

And:

Unfortunately, the welcoming visual mandala of food trucks will represent the height of your lunch experience. Because when you actually read DESCRIPTIONS of what is offered, now comes that familiar smoggy cloud of CONFUSION. It’s like attending an alumni REUNION of things you’ve never met. We have what the LA Weekly voted, in 2011, to be “LA’s most beloved Bacon chocolate” truck, hand-pulled venison sliders, kimchi on a stick, crazy uncle po’boy lobsterooni and those four simple letters, BOBA. I don’t know what boba is– I don’t want it– I want people to stop insisting on my getting to know it– I can barely run the SAFARI app on my Iphone– I want boba to go away.

You can read the entire article here.