Forno Bravo Community Cookbook

Pizza du Vully

This recipe is based on a famous pie from the lake region of Switzerland called Vully.
It consists of a sweet dough topped with cream, sugar and butter.

It is an ideal finish to a pizza night and can be served with a sweet desert white wine.

Ingredients are:

Base:
Flour, milk, egg yolk, melted butter, yeast.

Topping:
Cream, caster sugar and butter.

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Focaccia

This is a post on how to bake focaccia in a wood fired oven, with a fabulous and very different recipe that incorporates potatoes from New York baker Jim Lahey:

http://www.playinwithmyfood.com/home/2013/7/10/foccacia-in-a-wood-burning-oven

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Bacon croutons

1 pound bacon
2 cups bread cubes (preferably left over pizza oven bread) cut into 1/2 inch pieces

While heating up your oven for pizza, place bacon in a cast iron fry pan and place in oven door, keep an eye on it and rotate bacon as so it won’t burn. Once the bacon is crisp, remove the fry pan from the oven being careful because it will be hot, remove bacon to side dish, place the bread cubes into the fry pan and toss with the bacon fat. Place the fry pan back into the oven to toast the bread, this only takes about 2 minutes tossing bread every 30 seconds or so.
I use half of the bacon as a pizza topping and the rest is cut into bacon bits and added to a Caesar salad along with the croutons.
Note: this will be the best bacon you have ever had so refrain from eating all of it before it makes it onto a pizza or the salad.

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An Open Letter From James

Forno Bravo Community Cookbook
Everyone’s Invited to Join In!

Hello, Wood-Fired Oven Lovers.

Okay. I think we made a mistake. We included two pieces of similar news regarding the Forno Bravo Community Cookbook in the same publication (our June newsletter) – and it was confusing for our readers. We’re sorry about that.

So, let me try to clarify things here.

As you probably know, we recently started a special program to provide Primavera ovens to a few professional chefs, in exchange for their serving in an official capacity as consistent, regular contributors to the Community Cookbook. This is a fun way for us to build momentum and grow the Cookbook.

We have heard from a number of our community members who say they think that means we only want to have professional chefs posting recipes in the Cookbook. But nothing could be further from the truth! And we are very sorry if we implied as much and caused any offense.

The Community Cookbook is, as the name says, a community resource. We created it specifically so everyone could share their own experiences, recipes and comments in a community setting. We want everyone to join in and enjoy it! That is why we’ve just released a new, easier-to-use version of the Cookbook.

But from some responses we’ve received, I can see we were not clear about what we were trying to do.

Forno Bravo is all about community. For the past 10 years, we have enjoyed seeing each other’s ovens and recipes, making comments, giving tips, and getting to know a great community of people. Of all the things Forno Bravo has accomplished, I am the most proud of the group of people that has come together to create our wonderful community.

We want everyone to post recipes, make comments on other members’ recipes, and even create your own wood-fired cooking blog on the Community Cookbook. Jump in!

-Post recipes and your photos (you don’t even have to register to do this – we’re making it that easy): http://www.fornobravo.com/cookbook/post-your-own-recipe/

-Create your own blog. Sign up and write about your own cooking experiences and ideas. It takes just a few moments to set up your (free) blog via the Cookbook: http://www.fornobravo.com/cookbook/wp-signup.php

-View other members’ recipes to get ideas and inspiration. Comments and ratings welcome!: http://www.fornobravo.com/cookbook/

In summary, I want to sincerely express how much we appreciate all of you and your contributions to the world of wood-fired cooking. Please, light your ovens this weekend and let us know how it goes. We are looking forward to seeing all of your culinary creations.

– James

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Roast chicken with lemon and thyme

1 whole chicken
Lemon
Fresh thyme
Garlic
Salt pepper

Sprinkle salt and pepper in cavity and
Stuff with a few sprigs if fresh thyme and lemon chunks and garlic to taste.

Truss chicken and sprinkle with a good amount of salt and some pepper. Chop up some fresh thyme finely and sprinkle on entire chicken.

Put into oven with a temp around 550f no flame and close door

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Multi-Purpose Herb Oil by Peter Reinhart

Via Pizza Quest and Peter Reinhart > http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes/138-multi-purpose-herb-oil.html

My guess is that you will use this more than any other specialty topping, and you can make as much as you like because it will keep indefinitely in the refrigerator. Its original use was for focaccia but then I discovered it is also excellent drizzled over many types of pizza, and can also be used to marinate or flavor various ingredients, especially fresh, sliced tomatoes and thinly sliced potatoes (for potato parmesan focaccia or, even better, potato bacon focaccia (or pizza). I’ll give directions for making those in a future posting, as well as for my favorite herb oil clam pizza. I also use the herb oil as a bread dipping condiment, and even as a base for salad dressings. There are an infinite number of ways to make this, using both fresh and dried herbs in many combinations, so consider the following recipe merely a starting point until you create your own favorite combination.

Ingredients:

2 cups olive oil (extra virgin not required)

2 tablespoons dried basil

2 tablespoons dried parsley

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon fresh or dried rosemary needles

1 teaspoon dried thyme

2 tablespoons granulated garlic

(or 10 cloves fresh garlic, pressed and lightly sautéed in ½ cup olive oil)

1 tablespoon kosher salt or coarse sea salt

1 teaspoon chili pepper flakes (optional)

1 teaspoon paprika, hot or mild, smoked or unsmoked (optional)

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Quick Breakfast Pizza From Brad English, Pizza Quest

Via Brad English and Pizza Quest > http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes/471-another-breakfast-pizza.html

A Quick Breakfast Pizza

- Pizza Dough
- Peter’s Herb Oil
- Grated Aged White Cheddar
- Canadian Bacon
- Sliced Red Onion
- Salt Packed Capers to finish

Getting things done:

Pre-heat the oven to 550 and before you start cooking the pizza, change it to convection bake. [Or get your wood-fired oven ready.]
Spread out the dough and layer with the herb oil, cheese and top with the Canadian Bacon and sliced onion.

While the pizza is cooking, rinse off some of the capers and chop them up. When the pizza comes out of the oven, sprinkle the capers over the pizza.

Slice and serve!

This pizza was surprisingly good. I say “surprisingly” because I just used what was in my fridge that seemed like they would taste good and satisfy my breakfast quest that morning and I was happily surprised! Had my wife made sure there was an egg in the house, this would have been a great addition to this pizza! *Insert smile here :) !!! Add that to your list if you make this one.

The ham and the cheese both had some deeper flavors. The richness of the cheddar pulled out the smokiness in this otherwise simple ham. The salty briny capers were also a terrific accent that brought a lighter brighter note to the taste profile!

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Crushed Tomato Pizza Sauce by Peter Reinhart

Via Pizza Quest/Peter Reinhart > http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes/102-all-purpose-pizza-sauce.html

Makes Enough for 4 to 6 Pizzas

1 can (28 ounces) crushed or ground tomatoes
1 teaspoon salt (or to taste, start with ½ teaspoon and then adjust as needed)
1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried basil (optional) (or 2 tablespoons minced fresh basil)
1 teaspoon dried oregano (optional) (or 1 tablespoon minced fresh oregano)
1 tablespoon granulated garlic powder (sandy, not the fine powder)
(or 5 cloves of fresh garlic, minced or crushed)
1 to 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar, or lemon juice, or a combination of both (optional–some brands are more acidic than others, but I find that most benefit from at least 1 tablespoon)

Stir all the ingredients together, adding the salt gradually, to taste. (The basil and oregano are optional. I use both because I find most of my friends associate the flavors with childhood memories, but in an authentic Napoletana marinara pizza, made with true San Marzano sauce, you would use only oregano, and not in the sauce but as a garnish after the bake. The flavors of the herbs and garlic will intensify when the pizza is baked, so resist the urge to increase the amount).

Do not cook this sauce–the tomatoes are already cooked when they go in the can and they will cook again on the pizza (of course, if using this over spaghetti or other pasta, in other words, if it won’t be cooked again in the oven, then you can heat it up in a pan). This sauce will keep for 1 week in the refrigerator.

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