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Wood Fired Recipes Community Cookbook

Eid Bread (aka Wooden Mold Bread)

Sep 06, 2018Posted by guestchefPrint

Thank you to home chef, Ahmad Zeabi, for sharing this special holiday bread recipe with us! In this recipe, we are traveling to the Middle East.

Ahmad explains:

In Horan (Daraa), in the far south of Syria, folks used to make this special bread in the Fitr and Adha Eids; the biggest annual celebrations in the local culture, hence the name. Families would customize their wooden molds. Originally, they looked at this bread as a type of flatbread, similar to a pizza with no toppings, but later, began pairing it with a wide range of cold toppings, such as sour cream, concentrated yogurt, cheese, jam, etc.

In the photo, I used typical Syrian cold toppings, from the bottom left clockwise: concentrated yogurt, Shinglish (cheese and yogurt blend,) and Zatar (oregano blend.) It can be eaten without toppings as well. Match it with a cup of tea, for a beautiful breakfast/supper dish.

Eid Bread surrounded by bowls of toppings

A sample of optional toppings for Eid Bread

 

 

 

 

2 baked Eid Bread rounds coated in Olive Oil with Circle Pattern on top
Eid Bread (aka Wooden Mold Bread)
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A special Middle Eastern holiday flatbread formed on traditional wooden molds. You can top it with many different toppings from savory to sweet!
Servings Prep Time
6 loaves (8" each) 30 - 45 min
Cook Time Passive Time
2 - 5 Minutes 1.5 Hrs
Servings Prep Time
6 loaves (8" each) 30 - 45 min
Cook Time Passive Time
2 - 5 Minutes 1.5 Hrs
2 baked Eid Bread rounds coated in Olive Oil with Circle Pattern on top
Eid Bread (aka Wooden Mold Bread)
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
A special Middle Eastern holiday flatbread formed on traditional wooden molds. You can top it with many different toppings from savory to sweet!
Servings Prep Time
6 loaves (8" each) 30 - 45 min
Cook Time Passive Time
2 - 5 Minutes 1.5 Hrs
Servings Prep Time
6 loaves (8" each) 30 - 45 min
Cook Time Passive Time
2 - 5 Minutes 1.5 Hrs
Ingredients
Servings: loaves (8" each)
Units:
Instructions
  1. Roast the sesame seeds for 7 minutes in a pan on a low heat.
  2. Roast the fennel and anise seeds for 3 minutes in a pan on a medium heat.
  3. Depending on the type of yeast you are using, you may need to proof it first before adding it to the flour mix.
  4. Add the roasted seeds to the flour, along with the black seeds, sugar, and salt. Add olive oil and work it with your fingers tips until the mix resembles wet sand. Add the wet yeast mix.
  5. Gradually add the water and knead the dough for 15 minutes. Cover and let it rest for an hour in a warm place.
  6. Cut the dough into 6 pieces, and let them rest for an additional 30 minutes.
    White Eid Bread Dough Ball on Brown Wooden Mold
  7. Lightly smear the face of the dough with olive oil and then press the dough against the wooden mold until it fits to the rim. (The light coating of oil helps the dough release from the mold easier.)
    Wooden Eid Bread Mold covered in white dough with dark seeds
  8. Detach the dough from the mold and bake in the oven at 650° - 750°F. (Bake it in a pan for the first few minutes, and then finish it on the floor of the oven hearth.) It will cook in 2 - 5 minutes in a wood fired oven. Note: If the dough is puffing up excessively and obscuring the mold marks, drop the oven temperature a bit before continuing.
    Uncooked Eid dough with circle patterns on top
  9. Remove the bread from the oven and coat it generously on both sides with olive oil while it is still hot. Enjoy it fresh and oily! (You can also cool it and refrigerate or freeze it for later use.)
    2 baked Eid Bread rounds coated in Olive Oil with Circle Pattern on top
Recipe Notes

Finding the wooden molds can be a little tricky. Sometimes, they are available online in wood or plastic versions. They are also sold at Middle Eastern markets. The original molds were hand carved and passed down through the family. Tradition says that the circular patterns represent raindrops that mark a good growing season. However, the mold is not only for aesthetics; the raised marks also help hug the fresh toppings as they are applied. You can use a wide range of toppings from savory to sweet — anything from cheese, yogurt, and olives, to eggs, salami, mortadella, or even jams and butter.

Circular wooden bread mold with handle

Example of a traditional wooden bread mold

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