Written Recipes
Coos Bay Clam Pizza
Brad English

Kim's sister Loan (pronounced Lahn) came down from Coos Bay, Oregon where she lives, with a mission to get us together and make pizzas, cook some good food, and hang out with friends.  Knowing we all love seafood, she and Randy did a little digging (maybe a lot of digging) and personally dug up what seemed like a ton of Coos Bay Empire Clams!  I knew what we were going to do with those; I love Peter's take on White Clam Pizza from his book American Pie.  His recipe is a tribute to the one served at Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana in New Haven, CT.  I've made it numerous times and it always comes out great.

Having all of these fresh clams, we not only made a pizza, but Loan also whipped up a terrific pasta dish as well.  It was clam-tastic (I know that's cheesy, but this is a blog and it's true).

As with all recipes, once you make them enough you start to leave the reservation a little.  Peter's herb oil is a perfect example.  I use it so often, I just add herbs that I have until it looks right and tastes right.  For this pizza I spiced up the oil with some chili flakes.

 

Coos Bay Clam Pizza

- Peter's Signature Bruery Beer Dough *Made with Sriracha Salt as a substitute *Link here

- Peter's Herb Oil with a little extra red pepper flakes *Link here

- A big pile of Coos Bay Empire Clams -- if you can get them *See Note below for options

- Teaspoon of Fresh squeezed Lemon Juice

- Grated Mozzarella Cheese

- Grated Parmigiano-Regianno

- Chopped Flat Leaf Parsley

 

*Note: From "American Pie" about selecting clams for this pizza...

"When making this pizza, look for freshly shucked medium-sized whole clams, such as manila, cherrystone, or littlenecks.  You can shuck them yourself or steam them open.  An easier method, however, is to use either canned whole baby clams or another canned product called cocktail clams… (With these canned products, just drain the clams well…)  I do not suggest using chopped clams, even fresh ones, unless that is all you can find, as they tend to toughen during the bake."

We ended up using these larger clams for this recipe, which had to be chopped.  They were hand picked, shucked, and frozen by Loan and her family and brought down to us for this feast.  I did notice that some of the meat was tough, as Peter mentioned, but how do you not use the hand dug clams that came packed with passion and love?  I continue to reap the benefits of Loan's generosity as she brings, and even ships down, fresh seafood that they caught up there.  One day, we'll make the trip to visit them and join in on a crabbing trip, or clam dig on the beautiful beaches there and I'll post the photos.

I have also used the canned baby clams for this pizza and it always comes out perfect.

 

Prep:

Make up the herb oil *See Link above for recipe.  Add the fresh squeezed lemon juice.

I also added a little extra chili flakes to spice this one up.

Add the clams to the herb oil and let sit in the fridge for at least an hour.

 

The Coos Bay Clam Pizza

Pre-heat your oven to the highest temperature (about 550 degrees) for at least 45 minutes to an hour prior to baking your pizzas to make sure your pizza stone comes up to temperature.

Spread your dough out on the pizza peel and add a little grated Mozzarella and Parmessan Cheeses.  Don't add too much cheese on this pizza.  You want it to be a background element.  This pizza is about the clams and the herbs.  The cheese holds it together.

Add the Clams.  As you do, it will bring enough of the herb oil along with them.  There is no need for more oil on this.

That's it.  Now it goes into the oven.

Right when it comes out of the oven hit it with some more fresh squeezed lemon and top with the chopped parsley.  Because we were using these large clams that were caught, shucked and frozen, they put off a lot of liquid after the bake.  I simply tipped the pizza and drained off that excess liquid.  *When you used the canned baby clams, you don't have this problem.

 

Cut and Serve...

 

This turned out great.  It's terrific when you get the opportunity to cook with food that you know comes fresh from the source.  The only other ingredient needed for an amazing food experience is, of course, the good friends who we were lucky enough to be with.

*Peter suggests in "American Pie" that you can also make variations of this with other fresh/raw seafood such as squid, shrimp, or scallops.  Sounds like a plan!

 

Enjoy!

 

 

 
Sriracha Seasoned Salt
Brad English

I met Randy Clemens at a baking class Peter was teaching at a Sir La Table here in Los Angeles. We were just getting Pizza Quest going and Peter was out on a teaching tour.  Peter introduced me to Randy, who had come to visit with him, after the class.  Peter had connected Randy with his publisher and Randy told us that he was close to finishing his first book cookbook.  I loved the idea.  It was a cookbook about using Sriracha Sauce.  I love that sauce.

Well, it turns out Randy published his book.  It's called The Sriracha Cookbook. I have to admit, I had meant to get a copy of the book, but as life goes, I just hadn't gotten around to it.  However, while browsing the internet I recently stumbled on one of the recipes from the book.  It was for a Sriracha Seasoned Salt.

It didn't take me 5 minutes to go to the cupboard and pull out my box of Kosher Salt and start measuring up a double batch of the stuff.  I put it into a couple of canning jars and gave one to a friend and kept the other.  Ever since then I've been finding ways to use this salt rather than just plain salt in any recipe, or as a final seasoning topping to any dish.  It is a great way to add a little spice to a dish in a unique way.  I use it on nearly everything that I'd use salt on.  You haven't noticed, and I have been waiting to say too much about it until I posted my version of the recipe here on the site, but I use it all the time on my pizzas!

 

The Sriracha Salt is spicy, but in a more flavorful way, if that makes any sense.  In other words, it's more flavorful than it is spicy.  The balance between the salt and flavors and spiciness is perfect (for me anyway).  It's like when you sauté up some jalapeños.  The heat is mellowed and you are left with a nice flavor with a toned down heat factor.

I recently even substituted this salt into a Pizza Dough recipe and it definitely added a subtle flavor (I'll post that dough recipe next week). You could sense a slight little spicy note trying to whisper at you through the dough.  You may not even notice it if you weren't aware of it, because there's relatively little salt in the dough, but to me, half the fun of cooking is experimenting and trying something that is new, or interesting.  You could just add Sriracha sauce to your food, but having Randy's Sriracha Salt around gives you another element to play with when trying to create fun and interesting things to eat and share.

I have the book on my list of things to get!  I suggest you track it down too.

 

Sriracha Salt

- 1/2 cup of Kosher Salt

- 5 teaspoons of Sriracha Sauce (with the rooster on the label!)

 

Pre-heat your oven to 200 degrees F.

Add the Sriracha Sauce to the salt and mix well.

Spread the salt/sauce mixture onto a parchment lined baking sheet.  Spread it as thinly as possible so that it will dry out.

Place the pan in the oven and turn off the heat.  Leave it in the oven overnight.  As the salt dries, it will clump up.  Before storing, place it in a bag, or crumble it in your hands in a bowl to break it up into individual crystals.

I keep mine in a glass canning jar and when I pull some out, I still squeeze it between my fingers as I apply it to break up the clumps up a little more.

This is a no-brainer.  Try it.  You'll like it!

 

 

 

 

 
LKB Banh Mi Pizza
Brad English

For some time, I have suggested that when our friend Kim Wildermuth's sister, Loan (pronounced Lahn),  who's mother is responsible for our favorite "Mom's Soy Pickled Jalapeños" comes to visit, that we get together and make a Vietnemese inspired pizza.  I have been a lucky guest on many of her visits from Oregon, when she and her husband Randy make the trip down to cook for me.  (Well, maybe they're here visiting Kim, but in my mind it's all about cooking for me!)  Kim is an amazing cook in her own right, we've posted a few of our cooking sessions here, though she always humbly defers to the excellence of both her mother and sister as the truly great cooks.  Let me say, for the record, that they are all pretty awesome in the kitchen!

The first time I mentioned my idea of making a Vietnamese pizza Loan thought I was crazy. She loves to bake fresh breads and was interested in getting together on one of her visits and making pizza with me, but making a Vietnamese pizza wasn't on her mind.  I just think she didn't connect the two culinary cultures.  That's where my madness comes in; I planted the seeds.  Time cultivated the concept and a recent trip provided the chance to finally make some pizzas together. We traded some emails and Kim and I kicked some ideas back and forth, then she and her sister kicked them around and, aha, we wound up coming up with a pizza tribute to the famous Vietnamese Banh Mi sandwiches!

What makes the Banh Mi sandwich so good?  As with any good sandwich, it starts with the bread. After the French colonization of Vietnam ended in 1954, one of the things left behind was the French baguette.  When they first introduced this the Vietnamese called it Banh Tay, which means "Foreign Cake".  It eventually became known as Banh Mi which basically means "bread."  "Mi" is wheat.  The coming together of cultures reminds me of the old commercials where someone is walking down the street eating chocolate and would bump into that strange individual who walked around with a peanut butter jar.  When they inadvertently came together we supposedly ended up with the Reese's Peanut Butter cup!  Well, as much as I like a peanut butter cup, I'll take a crisp warm Banh Mi sandwich, filled with a spicy, tangy concoction of marinaded pork, pickled carrots, cucumber and daikon with a little mayo, jalapeño and cilantro to top it off.

Sounds a little like a pizza to me.  Warm crusty dough topped with all of these delicious ingredients. On top of that, another great aspect of this pizza concept that I love so much is the combination of warm and cool ingredients coming together.  The change of temperatures you experience as you bite into a warm pizza dough, with hot oozy cheeses, topped with a cool juicy topping, adds another element to your experience.

I decided to try a new dough variation for this pizza.  I made up one of my favorite pizza doughs -- Peter's Signature Bruery Beer Dough -- but during the preparation I substituted a Sriracha Seasoned Salt that I made to see how that might give the dough a little more participation in this flavor party.

 

The LKB Bahn Mi Pizza  (Loan, Kim and Brad)

- Peter's Signature Bruery Pizza Dough *Made with Sriracha Seasoned Salt (I'll post this salt recipe soon -- till then, use your favorite pizza dough)

- Peter's Chili Oil *Link to Recipe

- Brad's Spicy Mayonnaise Sauce *Link to Recipe

- Chinese Barbeque marinaded pork loin

- Sliced Pickled Carrots, Cucumbers, Daikon, Green Onions

- Sliced Scallions

- Cilantro

- Soy Sauce for drizzling

 

The Prep:

Make the Chili Oil ahead of time - link to recipe above

 

Spicy Mayo Sauce:

I wanted to come up with a way to use Mayonnaise on the pizza to follow the tradition of the Banh Mi sandwich.  I didn't think spreading plain mayo on the dough and then baking it would make for an interesting "sauce".  I pictured it coming out dry and crusty which didn't seem appetizing.  As we were prepping things, I came up with an idea.  I had made up some of Peter's Chili Oil to drizzle on our pizzas and thought about using that and adding some of Mom's Soy Pickled Jalapeños that I often have laying around -- especially when you're with Mom's two daughters!  In fact, we had a fresh batch that Loan brought down from Oregon.  It turned out great!  It was moist and full of flavor.  Check out the link above to this easy recipe.  I will definitely use this on a sandwich in the near future.

 

The Pork:

We used a Char Sui Chinese BBQ Pork package to rub onto the pork loin.  Loan substituted Fish Sauce for the Soy Sauce called for on the package.  She does so, because the pork remains brighter than with the Soy Sauce.  She also adds a little Black Pepper and Garlic Salt to the mixture.

Mix the ingredients and pour over the pork.

Follow instructions on baking a Pork Loin, or whatever cut of meat you are using.  Bake the pork loin.  I tried to pull some out of the oven a little early so that it would remain moist as it finished cooking on the pizza.  We let the rest cook a little longer and served it as an appetizer with some nice mustard on the side.  The thinly sliced, moist pork cooked up perfectly on the pizza.

Pickling the Veggies

- Julienne the carrots, daikon and cucumbers into long thin slivers and place in a shallow dish.

- Sprinkle a little sugar on the veggies and a touch of salt.

- Add enough vinegar to almost cover the thin layer of veggies.  *If eating right away, using rice vinegar provides a lighter taste profile.

- Add a enough water to cover the veggies.

- Add Fish Sauce because it goes on everything.

- Allow them to sit for at least an hour.

*The rest can be stored in a sealed jar.   Loan doesn't measure, so you'll have to experiment, or look up another recipe for exact amounts.

 

The Pizza Part:

Pre-heat your oven to the highest temperature, about 550 degrees, for at least an hour prior to cooking to make sure to get your pizza stone up to temperature.

Spread out your dough and cover it with the Spicy Mayo Sauce and drizzle a little of the Chili Oil over the top.

Add some of the sliced pork loin and scallions and place it in the oven.  Bake until done.

When the pizza comes out of the oven add more of the juicy bbq pork loin and top with the pickled vegetables.

Top with Cilantro and drizzle with a little soy sauce to taste.

 

This Banh Mi Pizza came out amazing.  There are many layers of flavors, textures and temperatures to experience with this pizza!  As you bite into it, you notice the cool pickled veggies and the warm crusty dough on the top and bottom of your mouth.  Then you begin to get into the warm bbq pork and spicy mayo sauce.  It's a flavor explosion!

What makes a Banh Mi Sandwich so good?  Well, I would certainly give an equal role to the warm fresh crusty French Baguette and the delicious ingredients.  A sandwich can only be memorable with a great bread.  A good sandwich filling can, in fact, be reduced to mediocre with a lousy bread.  It's the same with pizza.  A warm, delicious crusty dough topped with great ingredients will make a great pizza.  It all has to work together.

This will definitely be a pizza that I repeat and, as I write this up, I realize, I will be repeating it soon!  I'm pressuring Peter to play with this one.  I know it's one he'll love and want to see what he comes up with when he tries it.

Enjoy...

 
Spicy Oil
Brad English

 

As promised, here' the spicy oil recipe. This is a staple ingredient n our house; one that I can use for many things.  When I don't have any, I just sprinkle some chili flakes on my pizza, but the little extra time this takes to put together makes for such a better overall flavor.  The oil is spicy and flavorful without being too hot.  Instead of drizzling a little olive oil over the top of a piping hot pizza, I love to add this instead.

 

This recipe is right out of Peter's "American Pie:  My Search for the Perfect Pizza".  As with everything, once you make it a few times, you can start to wing it.  I almost always have some of Peter's Herb Oil, but by now, there's no need to go back to the recipe.  You start to understand the flavors that each ingredient provides so that you can soon make these recipes by feel.

 

For this version of the recipe I used my home made Srirachi Seasoned Salt.  I will post about that soon as well.  Regular salt works just fine as well.  I was just looking for a little something to make it my own!

 

Spicy Oil

 

- 1 cup Olive Oil

- 4 teaspoons sweet or hot paprika

- 4 teaspoons chili flakes

- 1 large clove, garlic, peeled

- 1/4 teaspoon salt

 

*This is the recipe out of "American Pie".  I don't need 1 cup of this oil so I cut it way back generally, but it also keeps forever in the refrigerator so there's no problem if you make the full batch.  You will figure it out as you get comfortable with it.  It's just about finding the balance of the ingredients as you like them.  As I said above, I also substituted for the salt with my homemade Srirachi Seasoned Salt.

 

In a saucepan, add oil, paprika, chili flakes, and garlic.

 

Bring it to a boil (yes, really!).

 

Reduce the heat and simmer for about 10 minutes.

 

Set aside to cool for about 30 minutes.

 

Strain the oil and add the salt.

*I added the salt during the boil this time in the photos which worked out.  I usually

add it after per Peter's instructions.

 

Drizzle it on everything!

 

 

 
Spicy Mayo Sauce
Brad English

I have been really busy the past couple of weeks and haven't been able to post any recipes, though I have some interesting ones to share as soon as I can get them all together and posted.  I decided to post an interesting sauce that I came up with for one of these pizzas that I will share shortly.  I came up with this as I was trying to figure out an appropriate sauce for the pizza I was making.  It wouldn't work with a traditional tomato sauce and my usual go-to  special sauce - an herbed oil -- didn't seem to be appropriate.  So, I thought I would try something...

...and it turned out great!  I decided I would post this as a separate recipe in advance of the coming pizza. (aka, a "teaser"). Enjoy!!

 

 

Spicy Mayo Sauce

- Mayonnaise

- Peter's Chili Oil   *I make this all the time from Peter's book "American Pie: My Search for the Perfect Pizza,"  *Link here

- Chopped Mom's Soy Pickled Jalapeños and Garlic

*See our homemade recipe:  *Link here

 

In a bowl, mix mayonnaise and chili oil.  I used a good amount of the chili oil so that the mayonnaise mixture won't dry out during the bake.

 

Add the chopped jalapeños and garlic, and mix everything together.

 

That's it.  It's not complicated, but I think it is iunique and delicious!  I will definitely be trying this on a sandwich in the near future (maybe with a little less oil for that).

 

*Tune in next week for a really fun and interesting pizza that we used this sauce for!

 

Enjoy!

 

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