#1  
Old 08-06-2012, 05:09 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: landisburg
Posts: 60
Default base for flue crock

would there be a problem with building a form to create my own arched base for the flue crock. I was thinking of using the Heat Stop 50 mortar and some wire fence material inside a plywood form to make a base to set the flue on. I am thinking to make it 3" thick and of course with a 8 inch hole in the middle. would the mortar hold up or would it crumble? should I add some fire clay? or use concrete alone? Help!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-07-2012, 10:25 AM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Finland
Posts: 152
Default Re: base for flue crock

Mortar won't work alone that thick, concrete can't handle the heat.

Your best bet is refractory castable if you don't wan't to use bricks.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-07-2012, 10:42 AM
mrchipster's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
Posts: 1,261
Default Re: base for flue crock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laku View Post
Mortar won't work alone that thick, concrete can't handle the heat.

Your best bet is refractory castable if you don't wan't to use bricks.
In addition do not use chicken or fence wire, use stainless needles in the refractory castable for added strength, non-stainless steel or aluminum wire will degrade and cause future problems.

Chip

Last edited by mrchipster; 08-07-2012 at 10:44 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-07-2012, 01:41 PM
GianniFocaccia's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Disneyland, CA
Posts: 1,507
Default Re: base for flue crock

If you are using the term flue crock to refer to the flue gallery, or vent, then yes, this is a viable way to go. Casting a vent allows for custom shapes and angles that would be more difficult to accomplish with bricks. Like Laku says, use castable.

These two FB builders successfully cast their vents:fxpose, drseward.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-07-2012, 05:35 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: landisburg
Posts: 60
Default Re: base for flue crock

yes I am talking about the vent to set the 8" round by 24" flue crock on top of. I have a form all cut out and ready to put together. never heard of refractory castable so now I will search for that.
my other option is to stay square with the sides of the doorway/flue vent area, whatever you call it and then set a 1" thick piece of marble on top of the fire brick. I think I can cut a hole in the marble slab and then set the flue on top of that. this would give me a square smoke chamber, if you will, and I would expect the smoke to draft out the flue OK. What do you guys think of that idea?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-07-2012, 08:10 PM
mrchipster's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
Posts: 1,261
Default Re: base for flue crock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagored154 View Post
I think I can cut a hole in the marble slab and then set the flue on top of that. this would give me a square smoke chamber, if you will, and I would expect the smoke to draft out the flue OK. What do you guys think of that idea?
Marble will not hold up to the heat, neither will Granite. Soapstone its the only stone recommended for that type of heat and it would need to be quite thick to hold up the flue. Soapstone is known for its veins and if one was in the wrong place it may also crack. So based on that I would not recommend it.

It is challenging to build the flue arch from brick but has been done by most who have these types of ovens, the brick can be cut to support the flue and a transition can be made to make it all work. I would hate to see you throw a bunch or work into something that is doomed to fail. The more complete the oven the more difficult it is to fix a broken internal component; so best to do it right the first time.

The castable is a great way to go as well as brick built, both are tried and true methods.

Chip
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-07-2012, 08:20 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: landisburg
Posts: 60
Default Re: base for flue crock

thanks so much for the great advice Chip. I will try cutting the brick and make the transition. I like the castable idea but one bag shipped here would be over $100. I can cut lots of brick for that amount of money. this is already costing a ton of cash. thanks again.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-13-2012, 06:51 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: landisburg
Posts: 60
Default Re: base for flue crock

On page 47 of the Pompeii oven instructions it states "pour the vent, and allow 2-3 days for the concrete to dry before you remove the form." I have three bags of quickcrete mix on hand and I would need to order the refractory castable and pay over $100 when it is all said and done. I understand that the rc would be the best but why does the book say to use concrete? this is not the first time I have found discrepancies in the "bible". Is concrete OK or is it a total no-no?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-13-2012, 08:06 PM
GianniFocaccia's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Disneyland, CA
Posts: 1,507
Default Re: base for flue crock

There are a number of items in the FB plans that are not optimum. One reason is that the plans originated a number of years ago, were intentionally simple, and the job of constantly updating them prohibitive. Another reason is that the evolution of the forum builders continues to redefine the standard for oven construction and design. And lastly, this forum exists to assist in the sales of ovens and all the related materials that go in and around them. The mere fact that builders share with others what they learn (good and bad) renders this a site of goodwill and cost-effective marketing.

Rather than take older plans as 'gospel', why not read up on the latest (free) techniques and designs and select those that fit your skills, timeframe and pocketbook?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-14-2012, 02:40 AM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,855
Default Re: base for flue crock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagored154 View Post
would there be a problem with building a form to create my own arched base for the flue crock. I was thinking of using the Heat Stop 50 mortar and some wire fence material inside a plywood form to make a base to set the flue on. I am thinking to make it 3" thick and of course with a 8 inch hole in the middle. would the mortar hold up or would it crumble? should I add some fire clay? or use concrete alone? Help!
Building a sand castle for the form and then trowelling over some castable refractory works really well and is simple and quick to do. 1.5" thick is enough, you can achieve compound curves easily and the stuff sets up really hard with or without ss needles. Also it only requires 24hr cure rather than a week like portland cement products. Downside is it's expensive.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
installing giardino 70 on base jamie Tools, Tips and Techniques 0 11-23-2011 09:55 AM
Making my base JakeRhee Getting Started 6 06-17-2011 03:56 PM
Deciding on a Base Allen Newbie Forum 16 12-15-2010 02:10 AM
Looking for feedback on C2G90 Base gerberpollack Getting Started 0 07-13-2010 10:40 PM
opinions on strength requirement of base Capt. Toddy Tools, Tips and Techniques 3 01-22-2009 02:30 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC