#1  
Old 08-18-2011, 05:17 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Simon's 36" LA brick oven

So it has begun. After a year and a half of learning, digesting, ruminating, obsessing, and bothering my wife to all hell over the subject- I've started on my oven.

First I'd like to give thanks. Dmun, Dino, Les, James, and all the rest, your shared experience has given myself and others excitement, inspiration, and knowledge -igniting a skill and passion around the world. Your posts have been invaluable, and I, along with the many others here, really appreciate the hard work you've put in for the site cataloging the build -the frustrations, and the joys.

After much thought, and some fantastical concessions on my part, I chose to proceed with a 36" diameter oven. Originally I was thinking of purchasing the 42" kit from Forno Bravo, and getting all the materials I needed in one purchase. The cost of shipping turned out to be prohibitive though, at $500 to deliver to Los Angeles, that puts the cost at around two grand, when considering the investment of additional materials for the foundation. Also there is the fact that a smaller oven will heat up faster and require less wood to fire, so 36" it is, sourcing most components locally to save on shipping. A decision I'm glad I made, when today I purchased the wet saw.

Saw- Harbor Freight 2.5hp wet brick saw. Purchased with a 20% off coupon put it at a little over two hundred.

For bricks I went with another local supplier, Sand Building Materials in San Fernando for $1.22 a brick for fulls, .99 for splits . I'm having 160 full bricks, and 50 splits delivered on Monday.

Regarding the photos below, there is an additional foundation outcropping on the right side of what will be the ovens opening, that I intend on making into a brick grill and rotisserie oven for special events. Also, I plan on adding a central support column for additional weight distribution and structural support.

Next investment I'm looking at is 25 bars of rebar - wondering what thickness to get.
Also can anyone give guidance as to the thickness needed for the hearth slab? You'd think after pouring over the facts on this site i'd be better at recalling the specs :\

Onward and Upward!
Attached Thumbnails
Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2858.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2859.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2861.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2863.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2887.jpg  

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  #2  
Old 08-18-2011, 05:44 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: So. Orange County, CA. USA
Posts: 1,171
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Regarding the Rebar - 1/2 inch..

Have fun and enjoy the build..

Chris
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Old 08-18-2011, 05:51 PM
NYC NYC is offline
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Posts: 110
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Slab in plans is 3.5" but I'm making mine 4".
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Old 08-18-2011, 08:47 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Thanks Chris and NYC for the replies - 1/2" rebar and 4" thick hearth slab it is.
As for the insulation I was planning on using the FB board underneath and blanket around, but have been looking at a couple using Foamglass on the threads. Anyone care to comment, FB vs. Foamglass?

Also, I'm considering pouring the form for the rotisserie grill/oven at the same time, and adding an ash dump for both the oven and the grill
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Old 08-19-2011, 12:16 AM
GianniFocaccia's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Location: Disneyland, CA
Posts: 1,491
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Congrats on pulling the trigger on your oven project. The satisfaction of building an oven brick-by-brick far outweighs the convenience of buying one, IMO. 36" is an excellent size for a home oven. Not too many builders keen on incorporating an ash dump for a Pomeii home-based oven.
John
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Old 08-19-2011, 05:55 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southbury Ct. USA
Posts: 435
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Quote:
Originally Posted by calipizzanapoletana View Post
Thanks Chris and NYC for the replies - 1/2" rebar and 4" thick hearth slab it is.
As for the insulation I was planning on using the FB board underneath and blanket around, but have been looking at a couple using Foamglass on the threads. Anyone care to comment, FB vs. Foamglass?

Also, I'm considering pouring the form for the rotisserie grill/oven at the same time, and adding an ash dump for both the oven and the grill
Welcome to the club of obsessed people! Friendliest, most helpful people on the net with tons of great advice.
I cannot compare FB to foamglas since I have no experience with FB board. On the other hand I am in the process of my curing fires and the hearth has gotten up to 500 degrees F while the thermocouple under the foamglas still read 77 degrees F I will keep you updated as the fire and temps increase.
Good Luck with your build!
John
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Old 08-20-2011, 03:05 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

John! I've followed your build with great appreciation, please do keep me posted (pun intended) with the foamglas's performance.

You're right that the people on this forum are the friendliest on the net. Good food breeds good people.

I'm considering spending tomorrow driving out to pick up some old reclaimed "fireclay" bricks that have been removed from around a pool. The bricks were supposedly long ago made by firing in a kiln, as opposed to cast concrete. I was thinking of using them for the rotisserie oven part of my grill and some of the exterior brick/vent work.

Does the fact that the bricks have spent a good deal of their life pool-side affect their use in food applications? Will the bricks have absorbed a significant amount of chlorine to then off-gas when heated to 500 degrees?
I know their isn't a significant amount of chlorine in the surrounding air of a pool, but people do drip when they get out.

This is the serious mental dilemma I'm having with picking up these bricks. Add to that the fact that, A) I'll have to load all 250 myself, and B) I have to work tomorrow night on the line as well, I'm between a rock and a hard place.

If you guys here on the forum say the bricks are ok, I'm going.
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Old 08-20-2011, 03:55 AM
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Location: Southbury Ct. USA
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

I wouldn't worry about chlorine in the firebricks as much as I would worry about the composition of the firebricks. I don't understand why someone would use firebricks with high alumina content, silica etc. for paving a poolside area. that doesn't make sense and I would question the temperature rating of those bricks. This is my worry wort thoughts on this, obviously no experience or scientific evidence to back up my worries.
John
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Old 08-20-2011, 04:48 AM
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Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Quote:
Originally Posted by calipizzanapoletana View Post

Does the fact that the bricks have spent a good deal of their life pool-side affect their use in food applications? Will the bricks have absorbed a significant amount of chlorine to then off-gas when heated to 500 degrees?
I know their isn't a significant amount of chlorine in the surrounding air of a pool, but people do drip when they get out.
The amount of chlorine that could remain in the bricks is insignificant and not worth worrying about. chlorine is a gas when not combined with other chemicals and the amount that would get splashed out of a pool and be retained by the brick is so miniscule it would be nearly impossible to calculate.

Chip
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Old 08-20-2011, 10:09 AM
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Congratulations on the beginning of your new oven!
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