#1  
Old 07-21-2008, 05:49 PM
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Default inter-locking bricks

Hiya guys and gals,

Here is another newbie question and probably a stupid question but I am know to do stupid things so I may as well ask.

I know the idea of the keystone brick on every layer is to tie that layer but if it is possible wouldnt it also be a good idea to lock each brick into place wit the bricks on either side where practical and even the brick above and below if possible?

Wouldn't this make the structure stronger and reduce the need for motar inside and outside of the oven ?

Regards
Imran
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  #2  
Old 07-22-2008, 01:28 AM
nissanneill's Avatar
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Thumbs up Re: inter-locking bricks

You've lost this little duck!
I always thought that a keystone was the last brick that set into place and held arches and lintels. It was wedge shaped and keyed it together.
I was not aware that there was one on each (horizontal) layer of bricks.
The mortar that you use and the positioning of your bricks locked them into position as they are surrounded by other structure and bricks where an arch or lintel is unsupported beneath it.

Neill
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Old 07-22-2008, 01:46 AM
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Default Re: inter-locking bricks

Quote:
Originally Posted by nissanneill View Post
You've lost this little duck!
I always thought that a keystone was the last brick that set into place and held arches and lintels. It was wedge shaped and keyed it together.
I was not aware that there was one on each (horizontal) layer of bricks.
The mortar that you use and the positioning of your bricks locked them into position as they are surrounded by other structure and bricks where an arch or lintel is unsupported beneath it.

Neill
Sorry you are right I was a little confused about the keystone. However I am thinging from a structure point of view interlocking bricks to me would be a sturdier solution to relying on motar as my understanding of the motar is that it isnt really a good bonding agent at those temps. Again I may be confused on this issue.

Would there be any structural reason why interlocking bricks would be a bad idea ?

Imran
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Old 07-22-2008, 04:20 AM
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Thumbs up Re: inter-locking bricks

Your strength is not dependent on the shape of yur bricks but the composition of and the preparation of the bricks.
My house is built with a higher percentage of portland in the mortar than normal and you will break the brick before you chip the mortat off it.
To ensure that your 'bonding agent' is at it's maximum, I would ensure that the bricks are:-
• perfectly clean and free from dirt/dust,
• wet, ie. been dipped in clean water and contains a significant amount of moisture,
• mortar is properly mixed with adequate water BUT not too wet nor too dry. This is sometimes hard to judge but you will know when it is correct because it is easy to trowel, apply and work.

I am not aware of interlocking bricks that could be used for a wood fired oven, especially a Pompeii. There are numerous cement interlocking pavers around but remembering that with each reducing row in your dome, the angles and shapes of the bricks will also need to change to suit to continue to be interlocked.
I always believe on the KISS principal and consequently adopt the best appropriate methods/materials for construction.

Neill
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  #5  
Old 07-22-2008, 04:54 AM
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Default Re: inter-locking bricks

You have to consider tensioning during the heating up
Interlocks will not allow the chains to "move" against each other, so it may lead to serious cracks if idea is wrong - ordinary masonry for me seems to be more even in distribution this tensions
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Old 07-22-2008, 05:44 AM
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Default Re: inter-locking bricks

Quote:
Originally Posted by dvonk View Post
You have to consider tensioning during the heating up
Interlocks will not allow the chains to "move" against each other, so it may lead to serious cracks if idea is wrong - ordinary masonry for me seems to be more even in distribution this tensions
DVONK,

Thanks that was the basis of my question was with regards to expansion/movement. I was looking at cutting notches in the centre of evey brick and then adding a interlocking brick to join 2 bricks together.

If movement is a requirement in the chains then I know my idea wont work but I needed to know if movement was a requirement.

Imran
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Old 07-22-2008, 05:45 AM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 73
Default Re: inter-locking bricks

Quote:
Originally Posted by nissanneill View Post
Your strength is not dependent on the shape of yur bricks but the composition of and the preparation of the bricks.
My house is built with a higher percentage of portland in the mortar than normal and you will break the brick before you chip the mortat off it.
To ensure that your 'bonding agent' is at it's maximum, I would ensure that the bricks are:-
• perfectly clean and free from dirt/dust,
• wet, ie. been dipped in clean water and contains a significant amount of moisture,
• mortar is properly mixed with adequate water BUT not too wet nor too dry. This is sometimes hard to judge but you will know when it is correct because it is easy to trowel, apply and work.

I am not aware of interlocking bricks that could be used for a wood fired oven, especially a Pompeii. There are numerous cement interlocking pavers around but remembering that with each reducing row in your dome, the angles and shapes of the bricks will also need to change to suit to continue to be interlocked.
I always believe on the KISS principal and consequently adopt the best appropriate methods/materials for construction.

Neill
Thanks nissanneill

I was looking at doing the interlocking only on the first few rows and then doing the traditional methods higher up.

Imran
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  #8  
Old 07-22-2008, 05:47 AM
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Default Re: inter-locking bricks

me neither - not an expert at all, just considering
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  #9  
Old 07-22-2008, 06:00 AM
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Default Re: inter-locking bricks

Quote:
Originally Posted by ikhan42 View Post
I was looking at doing the interlocking only on the first few rows and then doing the traditional methods higher up.
You'll be surprised how stable and sturdy the dome is without interlocking and other tricks and stuff - even unfinished dome, just you locked the chain with key stone. You'll literary need to tap it with rubber mallet - no kidding.
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