#1  
Old 07-06-2007, 04:58 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Ravensdale, WA USA
Posts: 92
Default Getting closer in Ravensdale

I'm attempting to attach a couple of pictures of my current progress to this. The IT department is out and I'm without adult supervision here.

I bought the metal studs and cement board today. I took the advice and bought the 4x8 sheets of cement board. Hopefully I will get the bottom half of the building done before I have to ask for help with the trusses this weekend. Starting the drying out process for real now. I also had some cracking in the dome coating but have solved the problem for now. A lot of it has to do with the type of mud you're using.

I started using the Re-Frax that I bought from James but ran out before I could finish. It's a great product but we're such a long way from Healdsburg that the freight would have eaten up too much money. Then I used a product called Sairset which is sold mixed in 55# buckets and started coating the oven. I put in on pretty thick and it cracked pretty good. Too good for my taste so I then went to Heat Stop 50. It's also a great product. So now I have a 1/2" thick layer of Sairset and a nice layer of Heatstop on top. I also kept it wetted down for the first couple of days and that may also have helped. My advice would be to use either the ReFrax or the Heat Stop. I have to believe the manufacturers of this stuff probably intend the stuff to be used for holding bricks together and probably not coating pizza ovens. I'd suggest buying the stuff from James if possible. It's a great product and I believe in helping the ones who have helped me and I certainly needed all the help he and the rest of the team have given. If the freight doesn't work out for you then by all means go for the Heat Stop. Lots more lumps in it though. Just run them through a wire strainer from the kitchen.

I think I should be able to cook something in the dome pretty soon now.
Attached Thumbnails
Getting closer in Ravensdale-oven00002.gif   Getting closer in Ravensdale-oven00003.gif  
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Old 07-06-2007, 05:07 PM
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Location: Spring Branch, TX 78070
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Default Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

Mike


Looks like you have a nice dome, good job.

You are right, I used a strainer to sift the lumps out of my Heat Stop as well. Sure mixed up nice after that.
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Old 07-06-2007, 07:49 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Tampa, FL
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Default Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

Very nice dome, very symetric.
As for the Heatstop - great stuff, I had zero issues of any kind (no lumps). Sounds like you may have gotten old bags that sat around in high humidity. I actually bit the bullet and ordered the Refmix (ReFrax)...but FB was out of stock at the time. I think the shipping on 5 bags was going to be over $200 to FL. Was nice to save the money, but I would have liked to have tried the Refmix...everyone has given it rave reviews.

Speaking of supporting FB.....don't forget the Caputo...or the tool kit - money well spent.....almost forgot, get the log holder too (I just received mine and started using it last week); it really makes a difference.

RT
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Old 07-06-2007, 08:50 PM
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Location: Ravensdale, WA USA
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Default Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

Thanks guys. I'm sure I wasn't alone when I was probably a little too critical of my own work. Now that there's nice coating of mud on the dome it's hard to tell where the real imperfections are. Once I get the building around hardly anyone will know.

I agree about the diagnosis about the old Heat Stop. It worked fine, just a couple of extra step in the process. We have a pretty soggy climate around here and it probably had been sitting in the warehouse for a while. I did order a few "necessities" from the FB store and it's like waiting for Santa to get here.

Better pizza heading my way,
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Old 07-07-2007, 09:18 AM
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Location: Ravensdale, WA USA
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Default Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

OK now I have a question or two about metal stud/cement board construction. First, how are the rafter/trusses constructed? Are they simply metal studs and if so what is the best way to construct this part of the project? They seem fairly flimsy, so I'm guessing they have to be supported on the open side somehow. Second, if I were going to put a cute little red tile roof on the stone/stucco building would I use cement board as a first layer on the roof? I'm trying to avoid using any plywood although it would probably work just fine. Are there any pictures that I may have missed that show this part of the construction?

I appreciate the help!
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Old 07-07-2007, 03:08 PM
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Default Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

Not sure what type of finish you are doing, but I went with the standard gabled roof. You can see here
http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/8/an...en-1199-2.html (Another Texas oven)

I constructed my enclosure frame from metal studs, including the two A-frames on each end. The roof joist is a 2x4, which is wrapped in 2 layers of aluminium foil. There is really no reason to wrap it, just a moment of weakness on my part. The roof deck is "tech shield" (layer of foil on one side)OSB roof decking. And then same dimensional shingles as my house, on the top. I have 2 layers of ceramic blankets, layer of aluminum foil, and then filled the enclosure with loose perlite, so standard roofing materials is not an issue. Considered durock as roof deck and more metal, but there is really no reason for it with my configuration. The only way to get flame or high temp convective currents into the roof is for my dome to fall in or develope a massive enough hole to displace the blankets and foil. In that case I have alot more to wory about.

The roof has a 14" overhang over the opening which is working great to keep the front dry.
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Old 07-07-2007, 07:38 PM
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Lightbulb Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

1.First, how are the rafter/trusses constructed? Are they simply metal studs and if so what is the best way to construct this part of the project?They seem fairly flimsy, so I'm guessing they have to be supported on the open side somehow.
>>>>>There are 2 types of metal studs load bearing and non load bearing you will feel the difference between the 2, the load bearing is much thicker and is what you need for the roof rafters. As to assembly you need to cut "tabs" where 2 members meet its really not difficult to do but I just found out its difficult to explain in writting. FORGET everything you know about joining 2 pieces of wood and it will go easier.
2.Second, if I were going to put a cute little red tile roof on the stone/stucco building would I use cement board as a first layer on the roof?
>>>>>If you are not already aware those "cute little roof tile" are VERY HEAVY and the rafters need to be sized and placed with this load in mind. As far as the cement board goes they really do not hold nails or skrews very well, sure they go through but since the material is ridged it doesn't "grip" the nail the way wood does and since you are going to use metal rafters you are gonna need some sort of either self tapping skrew or pre drill which is going to reduce the grip even more. This should be fine for the sheething and I guess the paper but with the tile you cant hit a rafter every time....unless you use a wood nailing strip on top of the paper (which is pretty common) and attach it to the rafter then attach the tile through the nailer to the cement board.
3.I'm trying to avoid using any plywood although it would probably work just fine.
>>>>>You really could just use plywood for the sheathing and not have to worry about it..I know gut instincts tell us...FIRE---WOOD not a good combination but you really have to appreciate the value of the cladding, insulation. If you were to use wood it would get hotter from the sun than from the oven..
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Old 07-08-2007, 07:41 AM
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Default Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

Hi.

RE: Assembling Studs and roof. I found this link here in the forum and thought the content was excellent. Lots of detailed pictures for the metal construction.

Yahoo! Photos - 5.WallsandRoof

I tried to include some level of detail as well:

http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/s....html#post6449 (Saint Helena Oven)
http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/s....html#post6450 (Saint Helena Oven)
http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/s....html#post6487 (Saint Helena Oven)

My original plan was tile as well, but I ended up liking the look of the temporary galvanized roofing I put on. It's not temporary anymore!
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Old 07-08-2007, 08:13 AM
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Default Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

JC-

That is so weird I have those same photos on my other computer (possiable dead ) and didnt realize it till you posted the link. Excellent illustration!!!
Where did they come form? some of the other photos look very familiar?!?!?!?!
J.P.
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Old 07-08-2007, 09:11 AM
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Default Re: Getting closer in Ravensdale

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unofornaio View Post
JC-

That is so weird I have those same photos on my other computer (possiable dead ) and didnt realize it till you posted the link. Excellent illustration!!!
Where did they come form? some of the other photos look very familiar?!?!?!?!
J.P.
Well, there was a link somewhere here in the forum some time ago and I had it saved as a favorite. I'd never worked with metal studs before this project and found the pictures very useful.

If you look at the pics of my oven, note the dual ridge beam on either side of the chimney. It worked out very well, I'd recommend that approach. My roof trusses were very solid, I'd think that the same approach spaced correctly would more than support a tile roof. I'd think the thicker wonderboard (.5") would suffice as underlayment nicely. Tile roofs do require furring strips though. To avoid wood entirely (thinking of rot, not heat), you could use some of that newer plastic composite lumber material. They sell some at our materials yard as garden edging that could be ripped in half and should be about perfect.
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