#1  
Old 01-17-2007, 07:52 PM
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Location: montana
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Default insulation I'm wondering if

There is a product that concrete workers use to insulate between the ground and the concrete floor when they plan to install floor heat using hot water to heat the floor. The insulation is made by Owens Corning it comes in different thickness from 2 inch up to 4 inch it is solid polyurethane board it is safe for high temperature but Im not sure if it is capable of the high temp in the floor of an oven. Anyone tried this type of insulation? it comes in 4foot by 8 foot size I thought of using it when I poor the floor system any comments?
Bill
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  #2  
Old 01-18-2007, 12:25 AM
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Default Re: insulation I'm wondering if

Do you have a name or part number? We could look up it's ability to withstand high heat and stop heat; which is what you are looking for.
James
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  #3  
Old 01-23-2007, 08:16 PM
Marcel's Avatar
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Location: Oregon
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Exclamation Polyurethane is not polystyrene !

Quote:
Originally Posted by irishlad View Post
There is a product that concrete workers use to insulate between the ground and the concrete floor when they plan to install floor heat using hot water to heat the floor. The insulation is made by Owens Corning it comes in different thickness from 2 inch up to 4 inch it is solid polyurethane board it is safe for high temperature but Im not sure if it is capable of the high temp in the floor of an oven. Anyone tried this type of insulation? it comes in 4foot by 8 foot size I thought of using it when I poor the floor system any comments?
Bill
(M) 'Top a tha Mornin to ya, me Irish Lad!"

(M) I was curious about the insulation you referenced above and wrote to Owens Corning. What follows is my email inquiry and Owens Corning's Reply. The bottom line is the workable heat range for their Polystyrene is only 165 F.

==================================================
(M) "I received indirect word that Owens Corning produces a solid insulation
of Polyeurethane. Is this true? __

If so, what is the highest temperature that it (or any solid insulation)
you produce can withstand before losing it's insulation value? ____

The application in question is to insulate under the slab of masonry
ovens. The slab typically had a layer of refractory bricks on top. We
are eager to keep the heat in the bricks and not permit it to penetrate
the supporting concrete slab.

Thank you."
================================================== ===

"Dear Marcel:

Thank you for contacting Owens Corning. Owens Corning does not
manufacture any polyurethane insulation.

We do manufacture rigid foam insulation, Foamular, which is extruded
polystyrene. Foamular products have a maximum operating temperature of
165 degrees F.

Foamular products are frequently used for underslab insulation. We have
a variety of compressive strengths available in our line of Foamular
products - if you could advise the psi strength you will require, we can
suggest a product to use underslab.

Please e-mail your response, or contact our Customer Care Team at
1-800-GET-PINK.

Sincerely,

Shawna Hemphill
Client Solutions
iSKY
240-456-4460 "

===================
(M) I hope this is helpful.

Ciao,

Marcel
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Old 01-26-2007, 06:58 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: montana
Posts: 10
Default Re: insulation I'm wondering if

So does this mean its not a feasable product? The Owens Corning?I'm mostly concerned with vermiculite as it is a cancer causing product when used without proper protection because of the silica
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Old 01-26-2007, 08:08 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Thunder Bay Ontario, Canada
Posts: 73
Default Re: insulation I'm wondering if

The answer would be no imo also. Keep in mind that when you have infloor heating installed the concrete and styrofoam below it would not reach a temperature greater than the preferred air temperature. So in most cases the you are looking at a temperature of +/-70F. If you are reaching temps in the 800-900F range inside your oven it sounds risky to use the styrofoam with a max working temp of 165F.

Also I have a comment about the silica. You are going to find silica in all of the masonary products that you will use for this project. For $30-40 you can get youself a good quality respirator with cartridges that may save your life. I work in construction and every day you see more workers wearing masks more often. Older guys I have worked with wished they knew what we know now about silica and asbestos. For us there is no excuse!

Versachi
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  #6  
Old 01-26-2007, 08:23 PM
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Location: Los Angeles
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Default Re: insulation I'm wondering if

Amen Versachi. I'm in the bad habit of not wearing any kind of protective gear at all. At 31 years of age, I really need to kick my own ass into good habits.. I guess at this point it's about breaking bad ones, but any reminder is gradually extending my life.
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Old 01-28-2007, 04:39 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Paradise, CA
Posts: 36
Default Re: insulation I'm wondering if

Never heard of anyone getting cancer from silica, though there is a danger of silicosis from repeated, or routine, breathing of the dust. Watch out for sand storms.
Earl
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  #8  
Old 01-29-2007, 06:54 AM
maver's Avatar
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Location: Puyallup, WA
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Default Re: insulation I'm wondering if

Quote:
Originally Posted by irishlad View Post
So does this mean its not a feasable product? The Owens Corning?I'm mostly concerned with vermiculite as it is a cancer causing product when used without proper protection because of the silica
Noosab is correct, silicosis is a risk from silica dust exposure (this is a bigger issue from cutting firebricks than pouring vermiculite), not cancer. Silicosis is a type of scarring in the lungs that can also be horrible, but it is from repeated exposure - not something likely for a home builder even with Redbrick's level of protection. In the past some vermiculite products (mined in Montana, I believe) had been contaminated with asbestos, but currently available vermiculite should not carry a risk. If your occupation has you in regular exposure then a mask or perhaps a respirator is wise.
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