#1  
Old 03-12-2013, 10:32 AM
yorkshireknight's Avatar
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Veliko Tarnovo. Bulgaria
Posts: 109
Default Chimney under barn dilema

Hi All,
Newbie here, May I first thank all who have contributed to this great site making it a wealth of information to those of us who are now, eagerly but with some trepidation, embarking on that holy grail to pizzardom and thank you in anticipation of your help and advice to my quandry.

I wish to build the oven inside my barn which has a very high roof, to the ridge is about 17 feet but the supporting beams are maybe only12 feet above ground
The barn itself is over 100 years old and has many oak beams criss crossing to support the roof some of the beams are about 12 x 12inches The roof however is fairly new covered with ceramic tiles.
My intention is for the chimney to vent through the roof.
My concern is the fact the chimney would be touching some beams on the way up.
So my questions are:
Would the heat emitting from the chimney be so intense as to set fire to nearby wood.
DO I HAVE TO go through the roof or would a cap over the top of chimney be enough to stop heat burning roof ( there is plenty of ventilation between the barn wall and roof, it is not a sealed barn) so smoke would hopefully dissapate through the eaves.

I live in Bulgaria so rules on what you do are a matter for the individual to some extents, I just dont want to burn my barn down.
It is very difficult, apart from the language barrier to source the materials people are mentioning. I have found Perlite but vermiculite seems to be unheard of.
Is anyone out there in FB land living in Bulgaria??
Once again many thanks for any help given.
YK
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-12-2013, 01:48 PM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,513
Default Re: Chimney under barn dilema

If it were mine I'd be using a double flue so the outside of the outer section wouldn't be hot enough to worry the timber beams. If you are short of cash you can make it double just where it goes past the beams and through the roof, keeping the rest of the flue pipe single. If you don't go through the roof you'll smoke out the barn.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-12-2013, 02:52 PM
stonecutter's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: South Carolina,USA
Posts: 1,523
Default Re: Chimney under barn dilema

Quote:
Originally Posted by yorkshireknight View Post
Hi All, So my questions are:
Would the heat emitting from the chimney be so intense as to set fire to nearby wood.
DO I HAVE TO go through the roof or would a cap over the top of chimney be enough to stop heat burning roof ( there is plenty of ventilation between the barn wall and roof, it is not a sealed barn) so smoke would hopefully dissapate through the eaves.
...... I just dont want to burn my barn down.
Whoa...Do NOT let your chimney contact the wood, double walled or not.

x2 on venting the chimney through the roof...Bad idea to vent it inside a building...doesn't matter if it is open or not. Otherwise the later part of your post will come true.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Current WFO build -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-13-2013, 01:46 AM
yorkshireknight's Avatar
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Veliko Tarnovo. Bulgaria
Posts: 109
Default Re: Chimney under barn dilema

Many Thanks David & Stonecutter for your prompt replies,

I shall take on board what you suggest.

1. I will definatley go through the roof ( and nodoubt will do many times on this project !!)
2 I will perhaps double line where close proximity of beams while trying to ensure no contact. ( You are very near to a yorkshiremans heart thinking of the cost David S)

I think they have flexy flues here so may have to use one to steer away from any obstacles.
I have looked,read, deliberated over many months on the Fb site and at last have now decided on WHERE it will go now I know I can work around my dilema.
YK
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-13-2013, 04:29 AM
nissanneill's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 1,845
Thumbs up Re: Chimney under barn dilema

yorkshireknight
my flue runs up through the roof,it is arounf 12 feet high in total and is double through the iron. It is only around15mm thick and I have packed it with a good insulation the outer surface does not get very hot. It is sealed on the topside with a standard plumbers rubber seal, probably silicone, but no deteriation over the past 4 years and I have had some hellish fired up the flue.
There are a few pics in my build, so check it out.

Cheers.

Neill
__________________
Prevention is better than cure, - do it right the first time!

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know


Neillís Pompeiii #1

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Neillís kitchen underway

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-13-2013, 09:39 AM
yorkshireknight's Avatar
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Veliko Tarnovo. Bulgaria
Posts: 109
Default Re: Chimney under barn dilema

Thanks Nissanneil,

Your oven looks a cracker, whats the diameter of your chimney?
I take it the flue must be reduced from its original size at the busy end, has this caused a problem with draught?
YK
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-13-2013, 02:11 PM
nissanneill's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 1,845
Thumbs up Re: Chimney under barn dilema

YK,
the flue is 8" all the way with a 10" or there abouts piece of what I could find laying about to go through the roof. There is no reduction in the flue at all as this would reduce the draw and we don't want that. The flue draws really well but the transition id quite large and captures all the smoke and gasses on light up. As I have said here before, the only smoke that I have ever seen was when I had some bought firewood that didn't want to burn nicely, I was running out of time so I hit it with a petrol leaf blower which made it work well, and when I went full throttle, you could almost have melted steel in it, no smoke but the flames actually were coming out the front arch. I thoroughly recommend a decent transition and a larger rather than smaller chimney/flue.

Cheers.

Neill
__________________
Prevention is better than cure, - do it right the first time!

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know


Neillís Pompeiii #1

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Neillís kitchen underway

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Chimney options Yahoo-Archive Design Styles, Chimneys and Finish 3 10-01-2010 10:18 AM
Storing heat: damper vs. door placed past the chimney? lancepawl Forum Guidelines 3 08-31-2010 04:47 PM
Chimney transition Wiley Design Styles, Chimneys and Finish 5 05-20-2008 09:25 PM
Chimney question -- fire hazard Joe Labbadia Design Styles, Chimneys and Finish 5 04-25-2008 09:05 AM
Flue Chimney Tips Alf Design Styles, Chimneys and Finish 1 08-02-2005 07:07 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:13 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
© 2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC