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Old 07-20-2007, 04:38 PM
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Default Begining stand construction

Well I've decided to get started on the stand construction so that I may actually have pizza by the fall when the weather outside is tolerable. Attached are the pictures of the first level for my stand. I decided to locate the oven to the right side of my foundation and utilize the available space on the left to incorporate a brick housing for a grill that I will purchase. Since the grill will have open flames I didn't want it on the right side next to the garage wall. Does anyone see any problem with the oven being that close to the wall? All the flames will be contained inside the oven, and with adequate insulation there should be no significant heat transfered through the housing wall, right? All comments and suggestions welcome. Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
Begining stand construction-stand-level-1.jpg   Begining stand construction-stand-level-2.jpg   Begining stand construction-stand-level-3.jpg  

Last edited by rlf5; 07-28-2007 at 11:28 AM.
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Old 07-21-2007, 10:10 AM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

Hi,

Some concerns I see are if those are wooden clapboards what about maintenance of them? Secondly the creation of the small space (6"?) between the house and the oven is useless and is going to create a damp space, from the photo it looks this whole area already has issues with moisture? If you cannot connect it to the house (code restriction) Why not either move the oven in the center of the patio or do a corner install at either the yard side or house side? The patio looks to be right at 12" if you move it to the center that gives you 3' on each side, you could incorporate your BBQ and Smoker on the yard side and a counter on the garage side???
I have to ask, what is the plastic for??

Last edited by Unofornaio; 07-21-2007 at 10:13 AM.
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Old 07-21-2007, 10:36 AM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

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Originally Posted by Unofornaio View Post
Hi,

Some concerns I see are if those are wooden clapboards what about maintenance of them? Secondly the creation of the small space (6"?) between the house and the oven is useless and is going to create a damp space, from the photo it looks this whole area already has issues with moisture? If you cannot connect it to the house (code restriction) Why not either move the oven in the center of the patio or do a corner install at either the yard side or house side? The patio looks to be right at 12" if you move it to the center that gives you 3' on each side, you could incorporate your BBQ and Smoker on the yard side and a counter on the garage side???
I have to ask, what is the plastic for??

Thanks for comments. The clapboards are actually composite concrete panels made to look like wood. The moisture present is acutally from the daily rain we've had here for the past 3 months. Usually the area is free of any moisture at all. The space on the right side serves a few purposes. One is to center what is to be the complete structure of the oven and smoker/grill. Second, there are little 1/8" tubings (sprinkler lines) that run along the base of the side of the garage that I have to have access to. Third, the channel creates an escape for ground water when it rains. I was going to have the oven centered on the slab before I decided to incorporate the grill. The plastic sheeting is just to create a barrier between the stand and the slab. In the remote case that the oven ever has to be torn down, I'd rather the stand not be cemented to the slab. The visible plastic will be cut away soon.

Last edited by rlf5; 07-28-2007 at 11:27 AM.
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Old 07-21-2007, 10:48 AM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

Oven stand. Stacked...not mortared. The holes in the back are for any lines (water, electrical, etc.) that ever need to be run. The holes in the front are for the thermocouple meter that I will embed into the stand. If there's anything that doesn't look sound please let me know. Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
Begining stand construction-stacked-stand1.jpg   Begining stand construction-stacked-stand2.jpg  

Last edited by rlf5; 07-21-2007 at 10:56 AM.
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  #5  
Old 07-21-2007, 10:52 AM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

Sounds good to me....
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Old 07-28-2007, 11:26 AM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

Decided to do away with the grill, so I centered the oven stand on the slab. This is the first course. I just put the bricks up to see how they would look. The facade will be composed of them.
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Begining stand construction-stand-1-second1.jpg   Begining stand construction-stand-1-second2.jpg  
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Old 07-28-2007, 04:27 PM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

You know if you just put some sand (about an inch) in the webs of the first course this will keep the concrete from attaching to the patio. But even if you were to mortar just the first course (to make it level) if you decide to move it the only evidence you'd see on the patio was the stain, the walls would come right off.
If you are just stacking them because you don't want to try to lay them if your gonna build the dome you might as well start on your laying skills now... besides stucco on the base will cover up a lot of rough work..go for it.. the guys on here can offer advice about laying block for the first time its not that bad a good tip is keep the mud (mortar) on the stiff side blocks are heavy and you'll be pulling your hair out trying to keep them from squishing all the mortar out. On the other hand there is no reason you cant just stack them..as long as the joints are staggered
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Old 07-29-2007, 06:09 AM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

Thanks for the tips! Yea I'll acutally be mortaring the first course in about an hour to make everything level. I could probably get by with how it is now, but then remembered how I hate to cut corners when doing stuff...especially something like this where doing it over isn't a viable option.
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Old 07-29-2007, 07:18 AM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

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Originally Posted by rlf5 View Post
.... Does anyone see any problem with the oven being that close to the wall? All the flames will be contained inside the oven, and with adequate insulation there should be no significant heat transfered through the housing wall, right?
Sorry for getting in this conversation late, but I'm looking at a potential oven site that is close to a house... but not as close as yours is. My concern is about the chimney. I believe either city regulations or physics suggests the chimney should be 2 feet taller than any structure within 10 feet. For me that would be a 2-story dwelling. I don't want to build a two-story+10-foot chimney.

Have you considered the chimney perfomance (or the effect of smoke) being so close to the side of your home?

Last edited by BrianShaw; 07-29-2007 at 07:21 AM.
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Old 07-29-2007, 08:49 AM
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Default Re: Begining stand construction

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Originally Posted by rlf5 View Post
Thanks for the tips! Yea I'll acutally be mortaring the first course in about an hour to make everything level. I could probably get by with how it is now, but then remembered how I hate to cut corners when doing stuff...especially something like this where doing it over isn't a viable option.
I hear ya..

For those ready to take the plunge if the footing slab is WAY out of level in one direction (even up to 2") you can still dry stack the blocks and make this up in the support slab by adjusting the forms. Once the block are covered you will never see it. But if your gonna build the dome Id still recommend "practicing" on the block...
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