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Old 02-10-2010, 10:33 AM
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Default Desurfacing a street sign

Okay, this is venturing pretty far afield of FB, so I apologize, but I had the serendipity to find a discarded street sign right about the same time I started designing and making my own pizza peels and rakes and such. I'm virtually certain it is aluminum, guessing from its color, sheen, and primarily weight.

Any thoughts on how to remove the reflective paint layer from the front side? When it comes to shop-work, especially metal, I have to ask about just about everything. I'm just not that experienced...but I love making stuff on my own instead of buying it, so...anyway...

Thanks.

Cheers!
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Old 02-10-2010, 01:04 PM
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Default Re: Desurfacing a street sign

Try throwing it in your oven, burn the paint off, then hit it with an orbital sander.
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Old 02-10-2010, 01:07 PM
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Default Re: Desurfacing a street sign

Hmmm, I'm constantly looking for ways to avoid putting stuff like that in the oven, but perhaps I have the wrong idea about it. Maybe if it cooks off at 900 in a separate firing, the oven will be sterilized by the time it gets used again for food. I see your point though. Same general thoughts about the aluminum actually.

...but I see your point. It's hard to imagine any surfacing surviving oven temperatures.
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Old 02-11-2010, 12:34 AM
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Default Re: Desurfacing a street sign

Most street signs are aluminum and most commonly they are made of "20 series" aluminum a characteristic of which is the inablity of most alloys of that series to be welded. This makes "re-appropriating" signs for other uses less desireable. They are also hardened such that when one tries to bend them they break at the bend.

Personally, I would NOT try burning off the paint in your WFO. Lots of reasons and I don't want to get into a argument with anyone regarding this. To me the downside of a bad outcome out weighs any possible gain from the convenience. I would suggest: try a heat gun or try mechanically removing the paint (wearing a good respirator). Be aware most states have laws regarding "gov't signage" which are designed to make them less desireable as targets of those who recycle metal as a means of income. My large peel is made from 20 series and works well. I would mechanically attach the peel to the handle using thru bolts.

Hope this helps,
Wiley
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Old 02-11-2010, 12:45 AM
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Default Re: Desurfacing a street sign

Get rid of the evidence on the sign pronto.
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Old 02-11-2010, 12:50 AM
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Default Re: Desurfacing a street sign

I dunno, a big octagonal pizza peel seems pretty obvious to me. Actually, I was hoping to use it for a rake, but Wiley says it might not bend properly. I'll see...

BTW, is that your first name Wiley? I think I've asked you this before. Apologies.
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Old 02-11-2010, 12:56 AM
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Default Re: Desurfacing a street sign

You wouldn't burn your pizza because you;d have that constant reminder... STOP
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Old 02-11-2010, 01:15 AM
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Default Re: Desurfacing a street sign

Wiley is the name of one of my dogs. I didn't name him, he is a rescued dog and whoever named him had good reason. Smart dog, he's a Red Heeler, ACD (Australian Cattle Dog) and even amongst Heelers he is smart and they rank high in intelligence as a breed. And like me he is getting old. Someday I would like to be as sharp as he is, (I know...in my dreams!). When I joined Forno Bravo Forum there were too many guys with my first name so I used his; he doesn't seem to mind.

You can still use a piece of the metal to make a rake. I simply screwed a piece about 1 1/2 inches wide and 10 or so inches long to the end of an old broom handle (recycling). That was a "build it now, out of what you have, 'cuz I need now" sort of project. Still going strong although I never expected it to last as long as it has. Use two screws so it won't spin.

Bests,
Wiley
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Old 02-11-2010, 02:41 AM
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Thumbs up Re: Desurfacing a street sign

Kebwi,
most road signs are reflective and are reflective.
This reflective film is laminated to the raw aluminium sign blank and unlike most film laminates, they don't have a very strong support backing.
This means that using a heat gun and simply warming the film, reduces the tack of the laminate making it easier to peel off. The weak backing will tend to break into lots of little pieces but heating it a little more, but not to the point where you melt the laminate (or even set fire to it), a good sharp scraper/spatular will make the job a little easier. You can then remove the remaining adhesive with some lacquer thinners or even petrol will dissolve it.

Neill
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Old 03-29-2010, 09:00 AM
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Default Re: Desurfacing a street sign

i speak from experience and was hoping to use some old discarded street signs to fab some peels and a door.

The glue that is used on street signs is super hard (impossible) to remove. I tried scrapers, acetone, sandblasting,
heat gun and even a propane torch. It was impossible to remove.

I ended up scrapping the idea.
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