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Old 02-27-2013, 11:10 AM
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Default 3:1:1:1

What type of lime should I use in the home brew mortar recipe also what are some quick pros/cons on refractory vs home brew both are available besides cost of course. One note in my area our local mason supply house said that using a homebrew mix is not code any longer for firplaces and would not recomend it for pizza ovens of course I trust the forum more than him just wanted to get some advice and thoughts.
I will be using the mortar for behind the firebricks on assembly of dome
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:17 AM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

He is correct for an appliance in the house, only because no one has paid to have homebrew tested.
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:20 AM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

Hydrated Type S lime.
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:28 AM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

3:1:1:1:1 is not really correct either, it is 3 parts sand by volume of the cementious ingrediants, and lime is considered a cementious ingredient, so the actual ratio is: 6:1:1:1.
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:12 PM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

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Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
3:1:1:1:1 is not really correct either, it is 3 parts sand by volume of the cementious ingrediants, and lime is considered a cementious ingredient, so the actual ratio is: 6:1:1:1.
Ive always thought that the home brew was a very strong brew, but not having used it couldnt say for sure, thanks for clearing that up.
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:30 PM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

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3:1:1:1:1 is not really correct either, it is 3 parts sand by volume of the cementious ingrediants, and lime is considered a cementious ingredient, so the actual ratio is: 6:1:1:1.
That is great but the ratios are intended to be a guide for making up the mix and not the actual end result. Lets keep referring to 3/1/1/1 and we will not confuse the issue.

Chip
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Old 03-15-2013, 03:00 PM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

May as well get it right and not confuse the issue. Use 6:1:1:1 and you will be a lot closer to a good starting point than 3:1:1:1.
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Old 03-15-2013, 04:36 PM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

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Lime is considered cementitious, and arguably the fire clay, since it doesn't get fired hot enough, is not. So at this point we might argue the ratio of sand+clay to cement + lime is 2:1 in the homebrew. A very rich mix indeed if you are building a house. If anything moves the bricks might break before the mortar gives.
This is exactly what I found when I demolished my first oven to build a bigger one. When I tried to chip the mortar off the bricks broke before the mortar gave. I finally resorted to cutting the mortar off the bricks I planned to reuse.
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Old 03-15-2013, 04:45 PM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

I actually dont like to see mortar joints inside an oven its the point of failure.
Some builds on here must think they are building a house the joints are that big.

Id be happy to dry stack the bricks and then slurry around the outside to keep it all together.

I used pre made thin joint refractory bog on my build and you need a feeler gauge to measure the joints.
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:19 PM
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Default Re: 3:1:1:1

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Originally Posted by brickie in oz View Post

Id be happy to dry stack the bricks and then slurry around the outside to keep it all together.
That's the way many neapolitan domes are professionally built.
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