#1  
Old 10-21-2009, 08:55 AM
Serf
 
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Location: Fort Worth
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Default Using wood framing

I am in the planning stages of an outdoor kitchen project and am wondering if it is acceptable practice to use PT wood framing and sheathing and then cover everything in cement board and stucco. All thpoughts are appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 10-22-2009, 07:56 PM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

what are you planning on building on existing slab, deck or dirt?
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  #3  
Old 10-22-2009, 09:34 PM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

My thought is, "why?"

You can frame in steel studs and cement board and it will be cheaper and no need to work with pressure treated wood.

Drake
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Old 10-23-2009, 02:49 AM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

I used metal studs when I built an outdoor kitchen a few years ago, so when I built the WFO at the house we have now I used metal again to build the enclosure. I figured not having anything flammable surrounding an oven that routinely gets over 1000 degrees when being fired would be a good thing. Metal studs should be available almost anywhere. Try a lumberyard. It's not that hard to work with the metal. Just buy a metal cutting blade for the circular saw and use good hearing and eye protection. And don't forget gloves. The metal can cut your fingers, and it gets hot when you cut it. And make sure you get the screws with self threading tips. I bought some a few years ago that just had a point on them -- they don't work nearly as well.

Joe
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Old 10-23-2009, 04:08 AM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

Hey Steve,
You have a lot of different factors going on here, PT should be used anytime there is ground contact, So your cabinet base should be done in PT. You can then switch to metal studs, which can be much easier to work with, you should also get a good pair of tin snips for cutting tabs on the metal studs.. The metal studs and cement board are not that hard to work with, and well within a beginners reach, the 2 most important things to remember are

1. a metal stud with a sharp edge is like a knife and will cut you bad,,,,(gloves a must)
2. any concrete board dust you do NOT want to breathe (respirator a must)

I dont see why you coulndt build your cabinet bases with the PT, But just wouldnt reccomend using it anywhere near the oven heat..

One more nite is that a respirator should also be worn when using PT wood,, the sawdust contains nasty stuff you dont want to be breathing..

Good Luck
Mark
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Old 10-23-2009, 05:15 AM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

One final thought: Using wood framing to support your oven is a big no-no. Ovens are heavy and fragile, and need rigid support, not something that moves everytime the humidity changes.
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Old 10-23-2009, 06:02 AM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisOldGarageNJ View Post
Hey Steve,
You have a lot of different factors going on here, PT should be used anytime there is ground contact, So your cabinet base should be done in PT. You can then switch to metal studs, which can be much easier to work with, you should also get a good pair of tin snips for cutting tabs on the metal studs.. The metal studs and cement board are not that hard to work with, and well within a beginners reach, the 2 most important things to remember are

1. a metal stud with a sharp edge is like a knife and will cut you bad,,,,(gloves a must)
2. any concrete board dust you do NOT want to breathe (respirator a must)

I dont see why you coulndt build your cabinet bases with the PT, But just wouldnt reccomend using it anywhere near the oven heat..

One more nite is that a respirator should also be worn when using PT wood,, the sawdust contains nasty stuff you dont want to be breathing..

Good Luck
Mark
Um, why not use concrete footings raised into a plinth and use that as the footer? That close to the ground even pressure treated wood is going to eventually fail (which will be gruesome for the countertop). Cob houses use plinth footer/foundations very successfully - I would think it would work for metal as well.
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:25 PM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

Quote:
One final thought: Using wood framing to support your oven is a big no-no
I agree and wasnt trying to imply that, sorry if i confused you with a blanket statement..
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:56 PM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

Wood is also a big no-no for framing the oven enclosure. You do not want heat working its way through a gap in your oven or vent and catching the oven frame on fire.

We have lots of Do Not Use Wood statements in the FB manuals.
James
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Old 10-23-2009, 07:17 PM
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Default Re: Using wood framing

I built my outdoor bar seating with metal studs. I found a BBQ forum that recommended using pieces of Trex board under the bottom track to raise the unit off the concrete, so that's what I did.

I absolutely LOVE working with metal studs. Once you get the hang of them, they are light-weight, faster than wood and really easy to correct mistakes (important for me).

As said in earlier posts: GLOVES!! I have the "stupid scars" to prove it.
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