#1  
Old 12-03-2006, 04:52 PM
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Default floor tiles

in a commercial oven what benifits are there in using tile rather than bricks for the oven floor?
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Old 12-05-2006, 12:07 PM
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The advantages of a pie-shaped tile floor are:

1. There are fewer joints, which makes the pizzaiolo's life easier.
2. Fewer ridges to catch the peel.
3. Easier to install
4. Easier to replace (many years down the road).
5. Better thermal characteristics. The dome should rest on the insulating hearth, around the cooking floor; not on the oven floor itself.

Here, where it is easier to find round cooking floor tiles, you find that a majority of the site-built restaurant ovens use floor tiles. Equally, a large and growing percentage of restaurants buy commercially-made ovens, rather than paying a mason to build one.
James
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Old 12-05-2006, 01:24 PM
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James - bullet No. 5 is an interesting statement. The oven plans call for the dome to rest on the floor. Would it be better to cut the floor into a circle and build the dome around it?
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Old 12-05-2006, 01:36 PM
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Les,

As a rule, it is better for the dome to rest around the cooking floor, not on it. That design offers better heat retention and cooking, and gives you more flexibility with the floor itself. The floor becomes a discrete piece of the oven, not that on which everything sits.

All of the the FB ovens have a "dome around floor" design, from the smallest Casa to the large commercial ovens.

For builders, the questions is whether it is worth the effort to cut bricks for the floor, and build the dome around the cooking floor. PaulAges did it that way; it's more work and more challenge. I am very open to this discussion, though we need to be pretty careful on how we handle it. I sometimes wonder if we already give too many options with the basic oven plans.

Whatya think? I am happy to modify the plans, if builders think that is a good idea.

Wait a minute. I get to poke fun at a competitor. There is a line of French-made ovens where the dome sits on the floor. For a commercial producer (they do this for a living) -- that is not good. Shame on them.

James
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Old 12-06-2006, 01:35 PM
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is there any concerns with oven expansion or anything like that? This is the first I have hear of the dome going around the floor. Very interesting!
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Old 12-06-2006, 01:36 PM
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are you saying that the dome bricks should be on the refractory concrete instead of the brick floor?
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Old 12-06-2006, 02:23 PM
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Artie - the floor and the dome are resting on an insulating layer not a refractory (heat absorbing layer).
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Old 12-06-2006, 02:33 PM
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Default Forno Bravo Modena

Artigiano,
The dome rests on the insulating layer, just as the cooking floor does -- around the floor. There is an expansion gap between the dome and floor. Without easy access to round floor tiles outside of Italy, it is a lot easier for home owners to assemble the dome on the cooking floor, but fundamentally, it is not as efficient a design.

I am working on a series of photos that show the installation process for the new Forno Bravo Modena, a high-end commercial oven, that shows this very clearly, but I won't be ready to post it until tomorrow. Stand by.

The Modena is a great oven, and installation sequence photos are very instructional. In this case, the cooking floor is cast a single piece ( of which the producer is very proud) -- no seams at all.

More on that later, but the answer to your question is yes. The dome rests on the insulating layer (not a concrete layer), which is how all the FB ovens are designed.
James
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Old 12-06-2006, 10:58 PM
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Default casting about for answers...

James:
The Modena is a great oven, and installation sequence photos are very instructional. In this case, the cooking floor is cast a single piece ( of which the producer is very proud) -- no seams at all.


Hi there! This may be just the shot for me: my delivery arrived yesterday after incredible hassles, and when I took off the cling wrap today, there was everything BUT the 25 hearth tiles!

How would I go about casting a seamless floor inside the (future) oven?

Kind regards,

Carioca
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Old 12-06-2006, 11:01 PM
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Default Is this a 'slip joint'?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jengineer View Post
Artie - the floor and the dome are resting on an insulating layer not a refractory (heat absorbing layer).
Hi, jengineer! Do I read this 'resting on' bit as referring to a slip joint, i.e. not rpt not mortared in place? (I'm still trying to get my head around the construction details...)

Cheers,

Carioca
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