#1  
Old 11-16-2008, 05:38 PM
Cooter's Avatar
Peasant
 
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Location: Australia
Posts: 26
Default Cooter's pompei

Hello all

I have just completed the support slab and feel as though i am really just at the starting line
The tube in the center is provision for a thermocouple,which i may or maynot install
Reading ahead through the plans is a bit daunting but exciting
With the next stage being the vermiculite thermal layer I am thinking of just forming up the actual footprint of the dome and its entrance
I am wondering how structurally strong or resilient to wear and tear the vermiculite layer is?
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  #2  
Old 11-16-2008, 07:52 PM
Jed Jed is offline
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

Hey Cooter,

The vermiculite layer isn't very attractive... it might be best to plan to cover it with something, stucco, tile, rock chips, or like Frances, 'twirly bits'.

JED
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Old 11-17-2008, 07:02 AM
staestc's Avatar
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Location: Rockwall,TX
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

I don't remember if you said if you are going with an igloo or a box structure over the dome. If you are going to igloo it, I would keep the vermiculite layer to the size of the dome, including the dome walls. If you are going to have the extra space a box structure give you, I would make it slightly (an inch or two) larger than the dome footprint. But I am no expert by any stretch of the imagination

Your progress looks great, by the way

Travis
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Old 11-17-2008, 07:48 AM
egalecki's Avatar
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

The vermiculite is strong in compression (as in under your floor) but it's not strong at all in resistance to abrasion and wear and tear. I made a vermicrete pad under my floor and landing, and it did just fine. But you can pick at it very easily- it scrapes and gouges easily and isn't weather resistant as a finish. I used cove base as my form and I left it on as long as I could while I built my dome to protect it. Once you're finished, you will protect it with whatever you choose to finish the project with- just don't use it as a finish. I think CVdukes had a problem with that- used it on the roof and it doesn't hold up well for that use.
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Old 11-17-2008, 02:47 PM
Cooter's Avatar
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

Thanks for the info

I am building an igloo so will just pour a slab the size of the external dimension
I was thinking of doing the layer in two parts..
First using a piece of 4'' garden edging in a complete circle, then boxing up the floor of the vent landing and oven landing as a separate pour
I am off gathering resources today and have a question on bricks

I have a pottery background and fortunately (or unfortunatly) been storing a stack of bricks from a dismantled kiln .I'm hoping they will be suitable
They are a creamy white colour with obvious porous structure weighing in at 5 lb
I thought i would get new ones for the floor but am wondering if these bricks will be suitable for the Dome
There would be no problem with the temp,but what about the thermal mass?
The darker one in the photo is just weathered

Cheers Cooter
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Last edited by Cooter; 11-17-2008 at 02:51 PM.
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Old 11-17-2008, 03:45 PM
staestc's Avatar
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

I would guess that they are probably suitable, given they were part of a kiln, but curious as to what size they are and how much they weigh. If part of a kiln, then they would not be insulators, so should be fine. Do you have enough to do everything you need, or do you plan on suplementing with some other bricks?

Travis
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  #7  
Old 11-17-2008, 03:55 PM
Cooter's Avatar
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

Travis
i thought i would get new for the floor to ensure a smooth uniform finish
but there are plenty to do the dome
Some of them have a little wear and tear,But i thought i would use the fresh cut face as the internal oven surface
I will take a sample when I look at floor bricks, they may be able to give me an assessment on their composition and suitability
Cooter

Last edited by Cooter; 11-17-2008 at 04:04 PM.
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Old 11-24-2008, 01:03 PM
Cooter's Avatar
Peasant
 
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Location: Australia
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

The thermal layer has now been layed.I found the vermicculite cement a very interesting mixture to work with.I can see some fun and games when I try to get the thermal layer over the dome to stick
I have decided to proceed with the kiln bricks even though they are a little on the light side (5lb instead of 8lb)
There is no doubt they will be up to the rigours of thermal cycling,so I will increase the thermal mass by putting a 25mm layer of refractory cement over the back of the bricks ( thanks Neill )
Will be shopping for the floor today at Little Hampton bricks,aquiring some new clay pavers
I,m planning an arched entrance so its into the fantastic forum to research that transition area
Cheers cooter
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  #9  
Old 11-25-2008, 03:11 PM
Cooter's Avatar
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

Well I achieved more than i expected yesterday,with a run around for materials and the floor down
Its only fair that this happens occasionally to make up for the days where there seems to be derailment at every turn
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  #10  
Old 11-25-2008, 04:27 PM
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Default Re: Cooter's pompei

making progress!!!

I think the red floor with the white brick dome is gonna look real good!!!

Christo
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