#1  
Old 08-16-2005, 10:17 AM
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Default Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent

Friends:

Reading this forum I could see that there are a lot of questions about vent area.
I hope the following pictures could be of some help.
Let me know if some others need to be sended.
Thanks to all.
Attached Thumbnails
Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-launchingarea.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-launchingareamodelling.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-launchingarea-polystyrene-model.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-launchingareavent.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-ventsideview.jpg  

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  #2  
Old 08-16-2005, 11:04 AM
Marcel's Avatar
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Smile Luis, how did you round the corners on the red bricks?

Dear Luis,

Thank you for the helpful photographs. Your work looks very good![img]images/icons/icon7.gif[/img]

The red bricks have rounded corners. My questions are:

1- Did you buy them already rounded? ____

2- Did you grind them to that shape? ____

3- Did you cut them into a rounded corner? ____

If #03 is yes, then what kind of a saw blade did you use? ___

4- Is the mortar for the red bricks basic ordinary brick mortar? ___

If #04 is no, then what proportions did you use? ____

Thank you for your help.

Marcel

Last edited by Marcel; 08-16-2005 at 11:06 AM. Reason: Miss Spelink
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  #3  
Old 08-16-2005, 12:14 PM
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Default

great photos! does it vent fine with this size vent opening? i have been assuming that i needed to have a slightly larger opening, tapering to the smaller size of the actual stovepipe, to prevent smoke from blowing past and out the door. no problems with this?
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overdo it or don't do it at all!
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  #4  
Old 08-18-2005, 06:22 AM
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Default Rounded bricks and Vent size

Marcel:

Thanks, the pizza cooked in it tastes gooood too (grin)
About the red bricks, unfortunately (in answering your question) I bought them rounded. There are several different rounded brick types in my country (I am living in Brazil).
However, I made other brick works and/or modifications. It is easy to shape them using a sheet of high degree (coarse) sandpaper (as indicated to metal) bonded on a piece of wood (2”x 8”x 1”) as a rough file. It is easier to work them to near of the required final shape and finish the work when mortared all together. If you desired a cute final shape, you could shower the bricks before final shape and use several fine degree sandpaper (always metal type), but in fact you are going to loose a lot of them.
The mortar that was used in the dome/vent building (refractory or normal bricks) was 10-3-11/2 sand, cement, clay.
Actually, on the first rows of the dome I used 10-3-2-1 sand, cement, lime, clay, that is better to work. However, since all the literature indicate the first one, I finished my work with that.

Paul:

How you can see in the pictures, the vent is nearly 9”x9” (brick size). The chimney will be a 5’ high x 6” diameter terracotta pipe (not installed yet).
The oven was building following the 63% door to dome percentage and it is blowing amazingly. When the fire is beginning and the wood is in great quantity to be consumed by it, there are high flames running up the vent and a lot of smoke too (remember, the fire begins almost out of the oven, and, when running ok, the coals are pushed rear into the oven). This smoke partially blows in front of the oven entry in these very first moments. However, when the fire is moved to rear, no smoke runs out the vent.
I have not other experiences with ovens, but I believe that is correct.
By the way, I could say that I did not have problems with this, even without the landing area/vent (The first pizza could not wait –grin).

I hope this help.

Luis
Attached Thumbnails
Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-ventfirstrow.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-ventfirstrowupperview.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-chimneydumper.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-firstfire.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-hotfire.jpg  

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  #5  
Old 08-18-2005, 07:13 AM
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Default Obrigado, Luis. More on rounding corners on bricks

Luis wrote, in part:

"Marcel:

<snip>

(L) About the red bricks, unfortunately (in answering your question) I bought them rounded. There are several different rounded brick types in my country (I am living in Brazil).

(M) Has anyone reading this post seen similar red brick with rounded corners available for purchase in the U.S.? ___

(L) However, I made other brick works and/or modifications. It is easy to shape them using a sheet of high degree (coarse) sandpaper (as indicated to metal) bonded on a piece of wood (2”x 8”x 1”) as a rough file.

(M) I probably misunderstood the above; I have not seen "sandpaper" bonded to metal. Perhaps you mean what we in the U.S. call "Emory Cloth" and sometimes, "Wet and Dry Sandpaper". There is no "paper" in this product; it has the cutting grits mounted on a strong tightly knit cloth (fabric). Our belt sanders use a similar cloth but I believe that the cutting particles are not "emory". I do not recall having seen emory cloth any rougher than about "#120 Grit".

(L) It is easier to work them to near of the required final shape and finish the work when mortared all together. If you desired a cute final shape, you could shower the bricks before final shape and use several fine degree sandpaper (always metal type), but in fact you are going to loose a lot of them.

(M) That does not sound too inviting ;-)

(M) I would consider cutting off most of the corner as a flat surface by using a tile saw. I would try the red brick tilted on it's edge (if that is even possible) ? Then I would consider trying my belt sander to round the 2 new edges. But I suspect that the belt would quickly lose all of it's grit. Perhaps a masonry stone on an angle grinder would work? ___

(L) The mortar that was used in the dome/vent building (refractory or normal bricks) was 10-3-11/2 sand, cement, clay.
Actually, on the first rows of the dome I used 10-3-2-1 sand, cement, lime, clay, that is better to work. However, since all the literature indicate the first one, I finished my work with that."

(M) That does sound like a special mix rather than the "Ready-Mix" mortar which we would buy already mixed and use in the garden.

(M) Your very clear and beautiful pictures suggest that you are a professional "Mason". The work is carefully laid out. I see that you even inserted a small sheet of "Masonite" to keep out falling mortar. I envy your skill.

(M) Obrigado, Luis!

Marcel
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  #6  
Old 08-19-2005, 07:12 AM
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Default Just do it!

Marcel:

Thanks for your words about my skills!
Only to encourage you to go with your work, let me confess that I am nothing near or similar to a “mason”, in fact, the oven in pictures is my first (one and only) complete building project.
The only thing that you need is courage (research and planning helps too) to go for your objectives.
If other peoples could do, you could, (advertising next<grin>) just do it!
Of course, I have sending pictures showing only the acceptable work ;>).
Answering your questions, sorry all by my poor English (it is my third language), however I “google” a little about “sandpaper” and it is ok. Sandpaper is exactly that I mean, the abrasive type that is used to wood or metal finishing.
It is inexpensive and you could obtain it in sheets or by foot. Of course, the ones with the biggest grit degree have no paper in it, but something similar to a “clothed plastic”. Do not worry about the use of sandpaper in the brick work, it is easy to do. Do not forget to wear a mask!
You could approximate to your goals with a tile saw, if you have one, and then finish the shape with sandpaper.
By the way, when working a wet red brick with sandpaper, the brick dust bond to this sandpaper. You could clean it under a water jet two or three times before discard it. Not pain ;0p
Referring to mortar, the “recipe” showed is about the mortar that is recommended in sites like “The breadbuilders”, “Blackoven”, “Traditionaloven” and so on (I have learned a lot in that, like in this one). Since the first moment, I had decided to do all the work to myself, then I did only bought (and will) the hardware that I could not obtain by myself. I do not like the idea of pre-building things. Just because I am facing this oven like a hobby!
The “masonite” or pressed cardboard that you saw in the pictures was used only to model the dumper (the same type that I used to model the dome vanes). It was replaced by an 1/8” aluminium sheet (I´ll take a picture asap).
I see that you have Portuguese skills too, nice! (My birth language is Spanish, gracias)
Bye
Attached Thumbnails
Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-isolatedslab.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-hearth.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-domelandarea.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-domeentryview.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-pizza.jpg  

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  #7  
Old 08-22-2005, 06:01 AM
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Default Chimney dumper and oven in progress

Paul:

How I promised, following some pictures about the chimney building and dumper.
I added a pizza picture, too. Oh, I am hungry again...
Regards
Attached Thumbnails
Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-bocahornochimenea-r-.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-chimeneadumper1-r-.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-chimeneadumper-r-.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-hornocomchimenea-r-.jpg   Pompeii oven - Landing area and vent-pizzaruculatseco-r-.jpg  

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  #8  
Old 08-22-2005, 07:13 AM
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Default That is SO good!

Your whole layout looks really good. Get out of the pool, and grab a piece of pizza. I like that.

I love the flanged ceramic flue tile. In the USA the flue tiles have flat ends and they are expected to stand upright, unsupported, for the whole run of the flue with only a little refractory cement to hold them together. Here, flanged ceramic tile is sold as drain tile. I wonder if you could use that instead, and still be in code? It's probably not refractory grade.

David
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