#1  
Old 10-22-2010, 12:12 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 30
Default Castable Oven Floor?

I was wondering if anyone has thought about having castable oven floor? I thought it would have been pretty neat to be able to buy a 41" floor from FB, and then just build my dome around it. That way I get the satisfaction of the build plus a solid piece floor. However, I have also seen castable cement sold in various places that supposedly tolerate 2200 degrees. Perhaps add some crushed lavarock and then polish off the cast floor like the cement countertops? Is this feasible, or is my ignorance showing through?

Thanks!
-jared
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-23-2010, 10:31 AM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,522
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

The material may be designed to withstand 2200 F but what it doesn't like is rapid heating and cooling. The resulting rapid expansion and contraction creates cracking.The larger the piece the more likely it is to crack. This doesn't really matter because a brick floor with many unmortared bricks is also a series of cracks but is free to expand and contract. Many commercial ovens have cast floors but are usually done in a few pieces to reduce the tendency to crack.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-23-2010, 10:43 AM
dmun's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 4,216
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

I'd avoid a castable refractory concrete floor, even if it wouldn't crack. It is, after all, concrete, and you're scraping your peels over it, no doubt scraping some loose. I'd stick with firebrick. It's cheap, and it works extremely well, as hundreds of ovens have shown.

If you want bigger pieces on the floor, you can get refractory tiles (really big firebricks) from a refractory supplier, but you pay a big premium over firebrick.
__________________
My geodesic oven project:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-23-2010, 12:29 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: FL
Posts: 61
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

You could use soapstone.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-23-2010, 06:49 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 30
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmun View Post
I'd avoid a castable refractory concrete floor, even if it wouldn't crack. It is, after all, concrete, and you're scraping your peels over it, no doubt scraping some loose. I'd stick with firebrick. It's cheap, and it works extremely well, as hundreds of ovens have shown.

If you want bigger pieces on the floor, you can get refractory tiles (really big firebricks) from a refractory supplier, but you pay a big premium over firebrick.
I did use the firebrick, just finished that part today. I had thought about Soapstone, but was worried about the effects on bread. Like you say, tried and true.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-30-2010, 10:06 PM
ggoose's Avatar
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Spokane, WA
Posts: 198
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

Though fire bricks are tried and true from a heating/cooling point of view, I am curious as to the effect of repeatedly scraping a metal peel over a brick containing aluminum...it seems that aluminum will wind up on the bottom of the crust, which is then eaten. Though the amount on each crust would be small, metals tend to accumulate in the body. Any thoughts? Perhaps a soapstone cap over the firebricks?

gene
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-30-2010, 10:37 PM
brickie in oz's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Whittlesea
Posts: 3,455
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

Sounds like one of them urban myffs where by you get Al symers from consuming Al uminium that is consumed from pots and pans that contain Al uminium.

Al being the symbol for Aluminium of course, which is probably where this miff originated. .
__________________
The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-31-2010, 08:10 AM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,522
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

The cement used is calcium aliminate, not the metal. Similarly there is a large content of alumina in fire bricks, but not aluminum. Or as you Americans like to abbreviate it, aluminum.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-31-2010, 10:00 AM
ggoose's Avatar
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Spokane, WA
Posts: 198
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

The compound Alumina is Al2O3...the Al is aluminum for the abbreviation impaired Not rying to start a ruckus, just wondering...

gene
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-31-2010, 10:19 AM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,522
Default Re: Castable Oven Floor?

It would be similar to ingesting some rust (iron oxide) you're not eating iron. I read somewhere that Alumina is the most abundant material on the planet, present in both soil and rock. I think it is quite safe in this form unlike the refined pure metal aluminum.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round james Newbie Forum 50 04-01-2014 09:14 PM
Mediocre Pie weekend/Why were my pies all “dough-y?” Fio Pizza 11 03-25-2010 06:29 AM
All things being equal Lester Newbie Forum 13 12-21-2009 01:26 AM
fire clay between bricks in oven floor...start over? Carlos Pompeii Oven Construction 0 09-23-2009 02:29 PM
Oven Floor Finish DimTex Pompeii Oven Construction 3 08-25-2009 09:17 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:31 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
© 2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC