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Old 07-14-2013, 11:22 AM
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Default Temperature Conundrum

Here's my conundrum. I have a Primavera 70. I've found that the best floor temperature for pizza is 750F-800F. Everything I've read about baking pizza in a wfo says you must have flames going up one side to about the center of the dome. My problem is that it's near impossible to keep the floor temperature under 800F while there's a live fire reaching up into the dome. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance!
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Old 07-14-2013, 11:31 AM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

If the pizza comes out great, it matters little what the flame is doing.
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Old 07-14-2013, 11:31 AM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

What is the problem? Floor high, dome high, cook them fast!
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Old 07-14-2013, 01:48 PM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

Have you tried the semolina test? Cast a little semolina onto the floor, if it goes black in 3 secs then it's right. 2 secs= too hot, 4 secs= not hot enough. IR's can be misleading because they read the surface temp and often show a much higher temp until the oven is fully saturated.
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Old 07-14-2013, 01:59 PM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

With the high conductivity of your floor tiles and the high dome, getting things balanced just right might take some trial and error, but it is very doable. Lots of people make some great Neapolitan in the Primavera 70.

I would personally seek guidance from John Della Vecchia:

John Della Vecchia

He produces true works of art in a Primavera 70.
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Old 07-14-2013, 02:03 PM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

I have a primavera 60...I know what you mean. I was given a great tip that has worked well in getting the fire to roll over the top a little bit with out raising the floor temp to much. I use almond wood chips and if the fire has died down throw a handful of woodchips on the coals, wait a few seconds for the flames to build and "roll" and then cook your pizza. Works great for us. Good luck

m
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Old 07-14-2013, 05:53 PM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

Thank you all for your suggestions. I'll try baking at higher temps, using the semolina test, and using some wood chips (not all at the same time!).

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Old 07-15-2013, 05:50 AM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

I agree with stonecutter.... However if you must have flames then run a damp mop across the floor, it will clean it and cool it down.
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Old 07-18-2013, 06:53 PM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

Having a cloud of flame floating on the ceiling of the oven is where all the magic happens. Pizzas become works of art when cooked in that environment. The crust comes out with that beautiful leoparding effect and the cheese and toppings fuse together in bubbling happiness. I agree that it is very challenging to bake in that environment. However, that challenge is why baking in a wood fired oven is so exciting. The secret here is quantity. If you are baking one or two pies, you will struggle to keep the bottoms of the pizzas from burning. If you are baking many pies, you will find that the hearth will normalize at a temperature that will not cause the bottom of the pies to burn. Remember to always place the pie in the same place. Do not constantly move the pizza around. Turn it once about half way through the bake.
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Old 07-18-2013, 07:14 PM
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Default Re: Temperature Conundrum

That sounds like very good advice tusr18a, thank you.

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