#1  
Old 03-21-2005, 02:04 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 239
Default Modern coal oven

Anyone ever heard of a modern coal oven? I know the EPA does not allow them any more, however, is there such thing as a catalytic combustor or similar device that can be used on the chimney? There are some coal ovens in New York -but only a few are allowed*-- and they had to be in operation many years before regulations changed. I need to be able to use these in other states in the U.S.

Also, I'd like to know if anyone is using*wood charcoal (without additives)*in pizza ovens instead of plain wood. Apparently, wood charcoal burns hotter.*

Thanks,
Marge
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  #2  
Old 03-21-2005, 02:11 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 239
Default

Anyone ever heard of a modern coal oven? I know the EPA does not
allow them any more, however, is there such thing as a catalytic
combustor or similar device that can be used on the chimney? There
are some coal ovens in New York -but only a few are allowed -- and
they had to be in operation many years before regulations changed. I
need to be able to use these in other states in the U.S.


### Either Pepe's or Sallies in New Haven uses coal (they were cousins
and one went coal & one went wood if I recall). Frank Pepe worked for
Lombardis which is the original home of a brick oven pizza here in the
U.S. You can put a catalytic combustor on the chimney it's just like a
normal chimney. It won't do anything because the thing is already
burning hotter than needed to take care of the emissions. Stoves would
be a different matter. But, regulators tend not to make such fine
distinctions so I wouldn't be surprised to find brick ovens tossed in
with heating appliances from a regulatory standpoint. (Interesting
note, in CT a brick oven is a food appliance and does not require
permitting for installing in your backyard...if it were a fireplace it
would need a permit.)

>
> Also, I'd like to know if anyone is using wood charcoal (without
additives) in pizza ovens instead of plain wood. Apparently, wood
charcoal burns hotter.
>

### You don't need that in a home oven. Regular oak
hardwood of between 1.5 & 2 cu ft will give you the 1000F dome temp
needed to coke the soot off and leave you enough burning coals to cook
pizza for about an hour. (And then you can cook bread, roasts,
veggies, etc. on the retained heat. Charcoal might be used in
commercial ovens but I don't know that for sure.

Jim
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  #3  
Old 01-19-2006, 10:37 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 3
Default

For Historical reference:
Both Sallies and Pepe's on Wooster Street in New Haven still use Coal Ovens along with the Spot owned by Frances the grandson of Frank Pepe. Frank Pepe Never worked for Lombardiís In NY, he worked at a bakery that was located in what was formally known as the Hill Section in New Haven owned by Christopher DeCapua.

Last edited by Primo; 01-23-2006 at 11:58 AM.
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  #4  
Old 01-19-2006, 10:42 PM
Serf
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yahoo-Archive
Anyone ever heard of a modern coal oven? I know the EPA does not
allow them any more, however, is there such thing as a catalytic
combustor or similar device that can be used on the chimney? There
are some coal ovens in New York -but only a few are allowed -- and
they had to be in operation many years before regulations changed. I
need to be able to use these in other states in the U.S.


### Either Pepe's or Sallies in New Haven uses coal (they were cousins
and one went coal & one went wood if I recall). Frank Pepe worked for
Lombardis which is the original home of a brick oven pizza here in the
U.S. You can put a catalytic combustor on the chimney it's just like a
normal chimney. It won't do anything because the thing is already
burning hotter than needed to take care of the emissions. Stoves would
be a different matter. But, regulators tend not to make such fine
distinctions so I wouldn't be surprised to find brick ovens tossed in
with heating appliances from a regulatory standpoint. (Interesting
note, in CT a brick oven is a food appliance and does not require
permitting for installing in your backyard...if it were a fireplace it
would need a permit.)

>
> Also, I'd like to know if anyone is using wood charcoal (without
additives) in pizza ovens instead of plain wood. Apparently, wood
charcoal burns hotter.
>

### You don't need that in a home oven. Regular oak
hardwood of between 1.5 & 2 cu ft will give you the 1000F dome temp
needed to coke the soot off and leave you enough burning coals to cook
pizza for about an hour. (And then you can cook bread, roasts,
veggies, etc. on the retained heat. Charcoal might be used in
commercial ovens but I don't know that for sure.

Jim
For Historical reference:
Both Sallies and Pepe's on Wooster Street in New Haven still use Coal Ovens along with the Spot owned by Frances the grandson of Frank Pepe. Frank Pepe Never worked for Lombardiís In NY, he worked at a bakery that was located in what was formally known as the Hill Section in New Haven owned by Christopher DeCapua.

Primo

Last edited by Primo; 01-23-2006 at 11:58 AM. Reason: Typo
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  #5  
Old 11-06-2006, 12:33 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Santol. Boac, Marinduque, RP
Posts: 37
Smile Charcoal

We plan to use at least some charcoal in our new oven. It is cheap and a
by product of the coconut industry. I will let you know how it works after I
get the oven well seasoned and up and running smoothly.
JJ
Philippines
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