#1  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:19 PM
MoonshineBaker's Avatar
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Moonshine Road, Camptonville, CA
Posts: 31
Default San Francisco Style Sourdough

Wow! great sourdough - very similar or better than what you get in most of San Francisco, in my humble opinion :-). I was gifted a San Francisco style sourdough starter last summer from Wild Flour Bakery in Freestone, California. ( Wild Flour Bread Bakery - Wood Fired Brick Oven Baked Bread - Wildflour Freestone ) I volunteered my service for a morning and was given their starter. I have used it over the last 8 months or so using the basic formula given in Alan Scott's "The Bread Builders". I got decent results with a chewy crust and an open crumb though overall the loaves were a bit heavy. I was using 80% Giusto's Baker's Choice and 20% rye flours at 67% hydration - 2% salt and 0.2% barley malt - with an over night pre-ferment that was 40-50% of the total dough weight- loaf weight = ~ 800 grams shaped as rounds- and baked at 450*F for 45-50 min. The people to whom I give the loaves say it's good flavor but a bit heavy; and I would agree. Today, as an experiment, I varied the formula as follows: 70% hydration, the pre-ferment/barm @ 40% of total dough weight, 50% King Arthur's All Purpose, 30% Giusto's Baker's Choice and 20% Giusto's Whole White Wheat Pastry Flour of the total flour weights, 2% Salt and no barley Malt as it is in the King Arthur's flour. I hand kneaded it for 10 minutes and finished it off in my Kitchen Aide with 2 minutes a a #2 setting. It was a very moist, sticky dough. I let it rise over 4-5 hours with one punching down per Hamelman at 65-70*F. I formed 3 loaves at 750 grams each. In a closed proofing box they rose for 3 hours. I docked it with a pair of very sharp kitchen scissors. In my FornoBravo wood fired oven, I baked the 3 loaves at ~450-475*F for 40 minutes - then 3-4 minutes with the oven door open for a cruncher crust. Great results: a nicely caramelized, crunchy crust, a nice crumb and best of all not the heavy, dense bread I was making using a heavier flour...duh! And a nice moderately tangy sourdough flavor. Any thoughts on what I've done are appreciated. Richard
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-31-2009, 08:29 PM
MoonshineBaker's Avatar
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Moonshine Road, Camptonville, CA
Posts: 31
Default Re: San Francisco Style Sourdough

Here's a photo of the breads.
Attached Thumbnails
San Francisco Style Sourdough-img_4171.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-31-2009, 09:57 PM
gjbingham's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 2,021
Default Re: San Francisco Style Sourdough

I'd love a taste. You're obviously working towards perfection. The numbers you posted just don't seem to do your bread justice. I can't touch, feel it, or taste it, and somehow, I cannot appreciate it by your descriptions, though it looks great. I'm happy that you are happy with it though. That is really what counts most.
__________________
GJBingham
-----------------------------------
Everyone makes mistakes. The trick is to make mistakes when nobody is looking.

-
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-01-2009, 06:59 PM
Jed Jed is offline
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Bend, Oregon; West Coast USA
Posts: 428
Default Re: San Francisco Style Sourdough

Hi Richard,

I have also been working with a starter. My experience is very similar to yours. If I use a high percentage of the 'white' flour, the bread comes out lighter. But I want the benefit and the flavor of the other grains, so most of my breads are pretty heavy.

Peter Reinhart, in his new book, addresses this issue by adding a touch of yeast to the final mix on the dough. Mix the two main parts, and set overnight: and when you put the two parts together (the starter and the other flours that have been mixed and set over night to develop flavor) he will toss in a bit of instant yeast.

With these receipts the breads come out lighter... and with the benefits of different flavors and flours.

JED
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-01-2009, 07:34 PM
Dutchoven's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 931
Default Re: San Francisco Style Sourdough

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jed View Post
Hi Richard,

I have also been working with a starter. My experience is very similar to yours. If I use a high percentage of the 'white' flour, the bread comes out lighter. But I want the benefit and the flavor of the other grains, so most of my breads are pretty heavy.

Peter Reinhart, in his new book, addresses this issue by adding a touch of yeast to the final mix on the dough. Mix the two main parts, and set overnight: and when you put the two parts together (the starter and the other flours that have been mixed and set over night to develop flavor) he will toss in a bit of instant yeast.

With these receipts the breads come out lighter... and with the benefits of different flavors and flours.

JED
Keep in mind that whole grain breads tend to be denser mostly due to the bran cutting the gluten strands...and not so much so due to the yeasts...if you are able to get a finer whole flour you will find a lighter loaf...also the flour can be sifted to remove some of the bran...
Best
Dutch
__________________
"Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity. " Charles Mingus
"Build at least two brick ovens...one to make all the mistakes on and the other to be just like you dreamed of!" Dutch
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-16-2009, 09:31 PM
MoonshineBaker's Avatar
Peasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Moonshine Road, Camptonville, CA
Posts: 31
Default Re: San Francisco Style Sourdough

Thanks for the feedback on the sourdough and adding yeast later.

Here's another experiment using sourdough....This last weekend I made what I call a sourdough ciabatta style bread. It turned out well in my opinion; it had a crunchy crust, bubbly soft crumb and good slightly sour full flavor. I did the preferment with the sourdough starter for 16 hours at 60*F using Giusto's Bakers Choice at 100% hydration. I used this as 1/3 of the final dough. The final dough was at 75% hydration. The flour for the rest of the dough was 90% KA all-purpose and 10% KA whole wheat flour. Giusto's yeast was @2% and added after proofing for 10 minutes. Salt was @2%, which was added after all other ingredients were mixed for 3 minutes at low speed in my Kitchen Aide mixer with a dough hook. The dough was mixed another 3 minutes at medium speed; the dough didn't pull away from the sides like I've seen with making regular ciabatta ala Hamelman. It sort of oozed, flowed into an oiled bowl where it rose for 2 hours at 65-70*F and more than doubled. I flowed it on to a well floured counter then divided it up. Each very loose bubbly section was put on an oiled and floured piece of parchment paper. Those were placed in a proofing box within a floured couche. They rose for another two hours almost doubling in size; were gingerly transferred to the oven on the parchment paper and baked for 20 minutes at about 500*F to 205*F internal temperature. There was some oven spring but not much. This is a really fluid dough and not easily handled!

Has anybody tried this? Again any feedback is appreciated.

Richard
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sourdough starter james Barter, Trade and Sell 18 06-06-2010 11:08 AM
Big sourdough spring james Hearth Bread and Flatbread 21 11-07-2008 03:15 PM
Mass produced sourdough james Hearth Bread and Flatbread 11 08-21-2007 02:54 PM
Neapolitana Style Oven (31.5") southpaw Pompeii Oven Construction 4 08-11-2007 06:29 AM
39.3" round cooking surface (Low Vault) Naples style oven QUESTIONS? southpaw Pompeii Oven Construction 0 02-03-2006 09:11 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:28 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
© 2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC