#1  
Old 01-09-2010, 09:33 PM
heliman's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 1,167
Default Sifting Flour ...

Does sifting flour before adding it to a pizza recipe change the dough texture at all?

Some have suggested that it "lightens" the dough and makes it more "airated".

I haven't noticed any significant diffence with/without sifting but perhaps others have...

Rossco
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-10-2010, 01:22 AM
nissanneill's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 1,871
Thumbs up Re: Sifting Flour ...

Rossco,
I have tried sifting and double sifting and compared to doing nothing to aerate the flour,I have noticed no difference.
That is why I just add the ingredients, mix them until I determine theright consistence, proof, divide, re-proof and bake.

Neill
__________________
Prevention is better than cure, - do it right the first time!

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know


Neillís Pompeiii #1

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Neillís kitchen underway

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-10-2010, 03:02 AM
heliman's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 1,167
Default Re: Sifting Flour ...

Thanks Neill ...

BTW I have been cutting and balling the dough as soon as I have finished kneading. Do you recommend another step ... "proofing" before cutting? If so, what is your method?

Rossco
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-11-2010, 12:02 AM
nissanneill's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 1,871
Thumbs up Re: Sifting Flour ...

Rossco,
I combine the water, (deep bore water used by the local brewery for it's beers), dried yeast and salt in a glass and microwave it to a warm body temperature. Put the flour in the mixer and dump the water once it shows that the yeast is commencing to work. I mix the batch until it is soft and flexible and is indicated when it continues to work it's way up the dough hook.
Turn it out on a lightly floured marble slab and knead it for a minute or two, roll it up into a ball and place it into an oiled ice cream container. I place the lid loosely on it (as they will seal quite well if you clip it on properly), and leave in a warm location to double in size.
I then remove it, cut it into pieces and round up into individual pizza sized balls and place in plastic Tupperware containers. I then put lids again loosely on theses and allow to again double in size when they are then ready to stretch (or in my case roll out) and assemble the pizzas. Timing is a little difficult so as not allowing the dough to 'over proof' with too warm conditions or too long before being used.
I handle the dough as least as possible and do not knock it down after the initial proofing. Cutting it into small portions is sufficient and I divide a single FB recipe batch (approx 900g) into 8 balls which give me around a 10" pizza base. I don't get paranoid either on getting each ball precisely equal to the others, but near enough is good enough. If you are hungry, grab a larger ball or come back for a second or third.

Neill
__________________
Prevention is better than cure, - do it right the first time!

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know


Neillís Pompeiii #1

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Neillís kitchen underway

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-11-2010, 02:19 AM
heliman's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 1,167
Default Re: Sifting Flour ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by nissanneill View Post
...
Turn it out on a lightly floured marble slab and knead it for a minute or two, roll it up into a ball and place it into an oiled ice cream container. I place the lid loosely on it (as they will seal quite well if you clip it on properly), and leave in a warm location to double in size.

[this step I haven't done before - does it make a difference to the end result? Is there a notable texture change in the dough with/without doing this?]

I then remove it, cut it into pieces and round up into individual pizza sized balls and place in plastic Tupperware containers. I then put lids again loosely on theses and allow to again double in size when they are then ready to stretch (or in my case roll out) and assemble the pizzas. Timing is a little difficult so as not allowing the dough to 'over proof' with too warm conditions or too long before being used.
I handle the dough as least as possible and do not knock it down after the initial proofing. Cutting it into small portions is sufficient and I divide a single FB recipe batch (approx 900g) into 8 balls which give me around a 10" pizza base. I don't get paranoid either on getting each ball precisely equal to the others, but near enough is good enough. If you are hungry, grab a larger ball or come back for a second or third.

[So is the dough ready to go right away or is there overnight fermentation?]
See above bold notes...

Rossco
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-11-2010, 03:33 AM
nissanneill's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 1,871
Thumbs up Re: Sifting Flour ...

Rossco,
some people follow my routine and also punch down the dough in teadiness for the second proofing but I don't.
To answer your question, I have always done it this recommended way and it works, nice light pizza bases, thick if left thicker and crispy if rolled out very thin. As I have said before, my wife is my biggest critic and she likes the results so I keep repeating a successful formula.
No, no overnight fermentation, I prefer to do everything on the one day rather than make the dough at night and leave the proof in the fridge. If it is for a lunch time pizza, then I start around 7am for the dough making, and if it is the evenning meay, then I start at around 12 noon provided I have a nice warm area (the slow combustion heated rumpus room for proofing in winter and outside in summer, depending on the temperatures. I find it much more controllable and less effort, but that's only me!
Around an hour or an hour and a half after the ball dividing, they are ready for stretching and building, cooking and enjoying.


Neill
__________________
Prevention is better than cure, - do it right the first time!

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know


Neillís Pompeiii #1

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Neillís kitchen underway

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-11-2010, 05:15 AM
heliman's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 1,167
Default Re: Sifting Flour ...

Thanks Neill ... interestingly I have had my best results making dough in the morning and using it that evening.

Maybe my fridge is the wrong temperature or something???

Rossco
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-12-2010, 03:43 AM
nissanneill's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 1,871
Thumbs up Re: Sifting Flour ...

Rossco,
I don't think the temperature has much more than delaying or slowing down the fermentation or proofing, allowing you more time to 'make it all happen on time' rather than over proofing or under proofing if the conditions are not ideal or you have your times wrong.
It is a balancing act at times and gets better with a little experience.
If my dough is raising too quickly, then I will slow it down by refrigerating it for a while and bringing it out to reach room temperature a half hour before use.

Neill
__________________
Prevention is better than cure, - do it right the first time!

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know


Neillís Pompeiii #1

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Neillís kitchen underway

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Historic Stone Flour Mill james Artisan Ingredients 9 03-07-2009 12:32 PM
KA Italian Flour and Pizza... texassourdough Artisan Ingredients 5 03-06-2009 09:05 PM
flour types egalecki Hearth Bread and Flatbread 11 12-08-2008 07:45 AM
Flour additives james Artisan Ingredients 13 04-28-2007 11:43 AM
Caputo Flour james Artisan Ingredients 0 04-07-2005 02:20 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:56 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
© 2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC