#11  
Old 05-21-2011, 08:22 PM
ggoose's Avatar
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Location: Spokane, WA
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

Nic,
Can you recommend a quality wet polisher?
Thanks,
gene
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  #12  
Old 05-21-2011, 09:36 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,446
Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

I know which one NOT to buy. Stay away from the Secco (made in China) that is sold on ebay for around $150. I purchased one and was shocked (lucky I wasn't electrocuted) the first time I used it. Sent it back (at my expense), they sent me a new one and it did the same thing. The inline GFCI does not work, and the handle and housing becomes charged if held at an angle. I chalked it up as a lesson learned, got what I paid for, and threw it out. Finished the job with dry polishing wheels (which don't polish nearly as well).

RT
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  #13  
Old 05-22-2011, 09:49 AM
ggoose's Avatar
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

Thanks RT,
I usually try to avoid the "Made in China" tools. I saw a few wet polishers on Amazon for around $220, made by a German company...Flex I think. Wonder if they are any good?
gene
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  #14  
Old 05-22-2011, 11:49 AM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
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Location: Tampa, FL
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

Never used any tools in the Flex line. I can say that the tool dealers in FL are happy with the quality and support of the manufacturer. (I've been in the pneumatic fastening tool business for 12 yrs, selling to many of the dealers that carry Flex).
For the most part all of the German tool companies produce quality - Bosch, Fein, Flex, Festool, Metabo. Usually can't go wrong with any of them. Just remember, every manufacturer seems to be producing parts and/or entire tools outside of their home countries so your mileage will very, even within the same manufacturer. The "global economy" has affected the best of the best...if they can save a dime by sourcing from China, India, Malasia, and even the eastern European republics, they will.

RT
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  #15  
Old 05-23-2011, 07:32 AM
Nic The Landscaper's Avatar
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

I started out with a couple of seccos. I didn't have the electrical shock problems RT had but the bearings did wear out fast. i might not have been shocked because I wear a full rubber suit when I polish, its cold in Oregon and getting sloppy wet while working only makes it worse.

But now I have a few Flex polishers and let me tell you night and day difference. More comfortable to hold, less vibration, better speed control and bearings seem to be lasting very well.
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  #16  
Old 05-29-2011, 11:07 PM
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Location: Berkeley, Ca.
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

Hey Guys,

Not to high jack the thread but I am about to try and pour a pour in place counter myself and would love a little (or a lot) help. With out repeating myself my thread http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/8/ro...tml#post113960 (Round shape) I just posted a similar question. (post 192)

-I don't think I will spend the money on a wet grinder, mostly because I don't want to expose too much aggregate.
-What is a normal thickness for a pour in place counter. (I was thinking 2 1/2?)

I would love any advice (Nic?- not to call you out or anything)

Mike
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  #17  
Old 05-30-2011, 08:59 AM
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Location: Vancouver Island
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

"What is a normal thickness for a pour in place counter. . (I was thinking 2 1/2?)"

1 1/2 inches is fine. This is the thickness of all the counter tops I have done (10 or so). Remember that finishing is very messy process. You may want to consider doing this in a different location then move them into place. You can do this with several helpers or rent/borrow an engine hoist.
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  #18  
Old 05-30-2011, 09:37 AM
Mike D's Avatar
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

Neil-

Thanks for the reply, the counter will go all around the oven, look at the picture it makes more sense to pour in place. I thought that if there is rebar in the counter, 2 1/2" is nessesary. I am planning on doing another one as a side counter and moving it later.

Mike
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  #19  
Old 05-30-2011, 09:56 AM
ggoose's Avatar
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

Mike,

Here is a youtube link for concrete countertops that is pretty good:

YouTube - ‪Building Concrete Countertops with Buddy Rhodes‬‏

Like Neil2, they also build their countertops 1.5" thick, and recommend something called "ladder wire", rather than rebar. They, as well as Sacrete (and others), produce a 5000psi mix specifically for countertops.

gene
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  #20  
Old 05-30-2011, 10:27 AM
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Default Re: Polished concrete tables.

I did mine a full 2", but 1-1/2 is fine with 5000 PSI mix. Ladder wire is used to lay CMU walls, and comes in 2", 4", 6", and 10" widths. I did the perimeter, wrapped the sink hole, and laid some across the inside corner. As a rule, even 3/8" rebar is overkill for a counter top.
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