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-   -   My Oven Build Pics + A Question (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f9/my-oven-build-pics-question-20145.html)

ItalyInspired 11-20-2013 06:41 PM

My Oven Build Pics + A Question
 
This is my first post on this forum, so I must thank all of you have who have posted so much great information regarding the oven builds + recipes. We definitely couldn't have done this without all the info!!

Here are some pictures of our build. We have a rectangle concrete patio, and built the oven off of one of the corners. Laid 2 slabs (one on top of the other), then dry laid and core filled cinder blocks with re-bar through both of the slabs and into the "top" table slab. Covered the oven in old Chicago brick that came off of a house in Chicago that was being fully gutted and re-modeled. Nothing like re-purposing 100 year old brick! We've got several extra pallets which will be used for an outdoor fireplace on the other side of the patio.

Believe it or not, but we were able to finish this oven in 12 days. We worked 12 to 13 hours each day, and thank God had perfect weather the whole time. We ate fast food each day to have minimal breaks, and I still lost 5 lbs!! I cannot believe the amount of concrete and mortar that I carried to cover 3 slabs plus what was needed for the brick. I had planned this project completely, and knew what it would take to build it so quick...but still...it was a battle! Btw, we're not contractors or masons. Although we're no stranger to home projects, this was our first attempt at concrete and brick work.

The oven sits on 2" of insblock 19, and is covered in 2 layers of 1.5" ceramic blankets. Most importantly...she works. Gets to temp quick, and retains heat perfectly, while keeping the outside of the oven perfectly cool. :)

We've got a lot of pics, so maybe I'll put together a build thread.

The purpose of this thread though....is that the oven dome is firebrick, covered in the ceramic blankets, covered in chicken wire, covered in refractory mortar, covered in a little bit of regular mortar, covered in the Chicago brick. We used regular type S mortar for the exterior brick work.

How do I, and should I protect the oven dome and chimney area from rain? My idea is to put an angled roof over the dome part, that is, put supports on the dome, to hold a roof just a few inches over the top, which peaks at the top of the dome, and comes down at a 45 degree angle or so down each side. (Hope that makes sense). This still leaves the chimney area uncovered, though there is a cap over the flue.

My wife will make a "blanket" to cover the oven and chimney. She's going to sew brown tarps together to fit perfectly over the oven in the dimensions of the oven, for the winter. But for aesthetics, we're hoping we don't have to keep that cover on it year round.

Are we ok to leave the oven as-is during the summer, or do we need to cover the dome / chimney area? If so, what's the best method? Is there any clear sealer we could put over the bricks that wouldn't show / couldn't tell that it's on there?

Any help is much appreciated!!

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y13...ps8586ea1f.jpg


http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y13...psf9fd0486.jpg

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y13...psccf27eb7.jpg

stonecutter 11-21-2013 01:59 PM

Re: My Oven Build Pics + A Question
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ItalyInspired (Post 165728)
Are we ok to leave the oven as-is during the summer, or do we need to cover the dome / chimney area? If so, what's the best method? Is there any clear sealer we could put over the bricks that wouldn't show / couldn't tell that it's on there?

You can leave the dome exposed during summer, but the masonry will abosorb moisture, so you should cover or seal it. Miracle, Silpro, and Dupont make very good sealers....to name a few. Bottom line, you do not want water soaking your masonry, which will lead to wet insulation. Masonry will wick moisture from the air even if it doesn't rain. A tarp over the oven is better than nothing, but it will create a condensation point and trap evaporative moisture, so the masonry will still be wet to some degree. I would seal the brick first, before winter sets in.

What is the best method? I would put it in this order...

1) Enclosure...far and away the best way to keep an oven dry

2) Roof over dome.

3) Unit masonry ( stone, brick, cmu) cladding or stucco ( with breathable sealer ).

ATK406 11-21-2013 05:17 PM

Re: My Oven Build Pics + A Question
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ItalyInspired (Post 165728)
How do I, and should I protect the oven dome and chimney area from rain?

Reclaimed barn wood/timbers would look terrific with the reclaimed brick and the wood siding on your house. But I see that you posted this question nearly 24 hrs ago so you have probably already completed your roof by now. :rolleyes:

Nice job by the way. I've probably got more time invested in my sketch-up file than you have in your entire build. Awesome!

Gulf 11-21-2013 05:39 PM

Re: My Oven Build Pics + A Question
 
I vote for Stonecutter's 2nd choice, a "roof over". IMO it is the best of both worlds. One that allows you to shelter the oven, but also "show off" the shape of the working parts :).

ATK406's rustic timbers would definately accent those beautiful brick!

I see an A frame over it, but that would mean adding some to your chimney heighth.

Just sayin'

Novaslo 06-02-2014 09:17 PM

Re: My Oven Build Pics + A Question
 
So much fun with a roof over it. You can cook under it, you can hang your tools and you can finalize a space that is your spot, the cooking spot!

Nice Build.


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