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  #41  
Old 09-10-2013, 12:14 PM
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Default Re: Mathematical analysis of dome geometry

Works for me! Can we get hold of your model and try to plug in our own designs please?
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  #42  
Old 09-10-2013, 01:02 PM
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Default Re: Mathematical analysis of dome geometry

I think this problem has so many variables it would be very difficult to calculate without a very large number of variables as input. Here is just a limited number of the variables.

Density of the firebrick dome and floor separately.
Thickness of dome if uniform then easier if it varies then more difficult.
Number of thermal breaks and then calculated heat transfer for each break
Thickness of floor.
Floor insulation and type and how much of each type.
Dome insulation, and type and how much of each type.
Flue arch, and all of the variables associated with dome or floor.
Ambient temperature of surroundings.
Barometric pressure
Humidity
Wind velocity and direction.
Altitude
Turbulence related to flue arch geometry there are many variables here such as floor at same level as oven, tapered entry vs straight, how much reveal at inner arch, arch to flue funnel size and shape etc...

Then there are all of the variables related to the pizza, dough hydration, number, type, mass, and hydration levels of each ingredient.
Placement of pizza relative to fire, last pizza location, number of pizzas in the oven,

Some calculation as to the amount of fire that is currently in the oven and values to account for ash insulation.

And this does not even begin to cover the types of tools being used, their materials, and how long they are in the oven and or how much heat they remove from the oven based on these variables.

So what is the bottom line for me....

If the oven is cooking well I throw another pizza in, if it is to cold I throw in more wood and wait a couple of minutes, if it is to hot I might lightly mop the floor or toss in a quick thin cheesy bread pizza to cool the floor a little.
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Last edited by mrchipster; 09-10-2013 at 01:06 PM.
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  #43  
Old 09-11-2013, 11:33 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: England
Posts: 14
Default Re: Mathematical analysis of dome geometry

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrchipster View Post
I think this problem has so many variables it would be very difficult to calculate without a very large number of variables as input. Here is just a limited number of the variables.

Density of the firebrick dome and floor separately.
Thickness of dome if uniform then easier if it varies then more difficult.
Number of thermal breaks and then calculated heat transfer for each break
Thickness of floor.
Floor insulation and type and how much of each type.
Dome insulation, and type and how much of each type.
Flue arch, and all of the variables associated with dome or floor.
Ambient temperature of surroundings.
Barometric pressure
Humidity
Wind velocity and direction.
Altitude
Turbulence related to flue arch geometry there are many variables here such as floor at same level as oven, tapered entry vs straight, how much reveal at inner arch, arch to flue funnel size and shape etc...

Then there are all of the variables related to the pizza, dough hydration, number, type, mass, and hydration levels of each ingredient.
Placement of pizza relative to fire, last pizza location, number of pizzas in the oven,

Some calculation as to the amount of fire that is currently in the oven and values to account for ash insulation.

And this does not even begin to cover the types of tools being used, their materials, and how long they are in the oven and or how much heat they remove from the oven based on these variables.

So what is the bottom line for me....

If the oven is cooking well I throw another pizza in, if it is to cold I throw in more wood and wait a couple of minutes, if it is to hot I might lightly mop the floor or toss in a quick thin cheesy bread pizza to cool the floor a little.
Reminds me of my aero engineering days! Despite the various disciplines of fluid dynamics, finite stress analysis, the more human side of ergonomics, a general rule of thumb was "if it looks good it might be, if it looks bad it might be". Looking at all the different traditional designs around the world, let alone the different ratios and dimensions fom current manufacturers, it seems that within certain bandwidths there are quite a lot of differences too. Yet various users of each type sing their praises. Thanks for reply!

I'm going to take a suck it and see approach: use loads of insulation, start with a door on the large size and reduce it if necessary.extend the chimney if necessary, use 2 to 3 inches of heat screed. It'll be fun!
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