#21  
Old 01-03-2011, 08:06 AM
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Default Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

I agree with everyone else that you certainly want to "buttress" the soldier course if it is going to be of significant height. I personally think stainless cable with all stainless hardware and angle iron to bridge the door is the easiest way for most people to go due to ease of both getting the materials and using them.
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  #22  
Old 01-03-2011, 09:46 AM
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Default Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

Quote:
Without buttressing or the tension cable method, I think a low dome oven could possibly have structural issues placed upon the soldier course. If you choose not to use one of those two methods, I would consider cutting the soldier course nearly in half with a catliever angled top to get that dome into its turning as soon as possibly.
I am not sure what a cantilevered dome is, but I did find an interesting construction method by a commercial oven manufacturer in Italy via their website. After constructing a very shallow brick dome, they lifted the entire mass via a crane and lowered it onto tall vertical soldiers. The perimeter edges matched up perfectly and appeared to place all of the thrust downward through the middle of the soldiers.

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The best solution seems to be Dmuns idea of removing the soldier course and simply using the same 1/2 cut bricks set horizontally just like the rest of the dome. You will lose a bit of height towards the outside walls, but considerable less stress on the side bricks and mortar
I copied Les and made the first two horizontal courses vertical prior to angling the third course inwards.

John
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Last edited by GianniFocaccia; 01-04-2011 at 08:01 AM. Reason: typo
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  #23  
Old 01-03-2011, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GianniFocaccia View Post
I am not sure what a cantilevered dome is, but I did find an interesting construction method by a commercial oven manufacturer in Italy via their website. After constructing a very shallow brick dome, they lifted the entire mass via a crane and lowered it onto tall vertical soldiers. The perimeter edges matched up perfectly and appeared to place all of the thrust downward through the middle of the soldiers.



I copied Les and made the first two horizontal courses vertical prior angling the third course inwards.

John
That solves the issues for sure, I think I'll do that too....A very clean build! Thanks for the picture

I'm using used firebrick for the dome. I've read a couple posts where there was a recommendation as to where to put the cut side of the firebrick relative to the center of the dome. In my case, the cut side is likely to be the cleanest surface and best surviving edges....Why not put the cut surfaces toward the inside of the dome?
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:03 PM
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Default Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

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Why not put the cut surfaces toward the inside of the dome?
I went with the cut side in because I thought it looked the cleanest but now wish I'd put it facing out. The way I understand it, as bricks originally fire, the outside surface of the brick is the most exposed to the firing heat and is the most vitrified.
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:21 PM
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Default Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

I dont think fire bricks will be vitrified?

Modern house bricks are vitrified and are way harder and lots more brittle that fire bricks.
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  #26  
Old 01-04-2011, 12:21 AM
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Default Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

Vitrification is when the material actually begins to melt. Fire bricks are designed not to vitrify even at very high temps like 1500 C This means that there is no vitrification either on the surface or in the middle, it also means that a fire brick is really porous and therefore has a tendency to soak up moisture like a sponge.
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Old 01-04-2011, 07:03 AM
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Question Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

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Originally Posted by Lburou View Post
That solves the issues for sure, I think I'll do that too....A very clean build! Thanks for the picture

I'm using used firebrick for the dome. I've read a couple posts where there was a recommendation as to where to put the cut side of the firebrick relative to the center of the dome. In my case, the cut side is likely to be the cleanest surface and best surviving edges....Why not put the cut surfaces toward the inside of the dome?
Quote:
Originally Posted by GianniFocaccia View Post
I went with the cut side in because I thought it looked the cleanest but now wish I'd put it facing out.
The way I understand it, as bricks originally fire, the outside surface of the brick is the most exposed to the firing heat and is the most vitrified.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brickie in oz View Post
I dont think fire bricks will be vitrified?

Modern house bricks are vitrified and are way harder and lots more brittle that fire bricks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by david s View Post
Vitrification is when the material actually begins to melt. Fire bricks are designed not to vitrify even at very high temps like 1500 C This means that there is no vitrification either on the surface or in the middle, it also means that a fire brick is really porous and therefore has a tendency to soak up moisture like a sponge.
So, what is the consensus here, cut face 'IN' or 'OUT'?
I'm flexible on this, just want to understand enough to have a reason whichever way I go.
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  #28  
Old 01-04-2011, 07:19 AM
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Default Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

Thanks for the clarification, David. I seem to remember dmun stating that a brick's ability to withstand heat is greatest where the firing process was most effective. I guess there is a more accurate term for this surface property. Maybe TS would know.
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  #29  
Old 01-04-2011, 07:59 AM
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Default Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

Firebrick are still partially vitrified, cut one in half and you can see the depth of the process. For our application I don't think it is critical other than for appearances, because the cut end will certainly look different.

Here is a firebrick I just broke open. I had to adjust the contrast so you could easily see the difference.
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  #30  
Old 01-04-2011, 08:08 AM
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Default Re: Dome/Door height ratio with

I don't think it is critical, whichever way you go.
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