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  #11  
Old 02-20-2013, 03:01 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

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Originally Posted by mikku View Post
I guess main reason, portability.

Same reason for "Weber" type BBQ grills, people cannot always stay at one location forever or have the inclination to create monuments.

So a day at the beach could include baking a pizza, just throw the portable oven in the car along with the rest of the stuff... Get to your destination--assemble some KD parts--add some "mass" readily available--i.e. beach sand, stone rubble, whatever. Light it up with "twigs", heat beads, and enjoy.. When you leave, return the "re-usables" to their original location. Only difference, they got heated up a little once.
What you are describing can already be done with a grill. And when you have something designed to be heated up to 700*-900* to do what you want it to do..and do it efficiently...then you will have to wait awhile before you throw it into your car and go home.

All that aside, masonry does not like movement, and if you factor in thermal cycles, a thin shelled portable oven wouldn't last very long.
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  #12  
Old 02-20-2013, 03:07 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

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Originally Posted by mikku View Post
The point is "scale", why does an oven need to resemble a garage, interstate tunnel, stadium or cathedral with flying buttresses? Thought there would be some middle ground to explore so more people could enjoy a WFO.

I guess part of this discussion needs to define what are the essential components of a WFO?

Which traditional parts are superfluous and gaudy.

What would a bare bones oven look like? Its design should reflect its function.
Again, masonry has its limits when you add motion to the equation. You need mass when you are building with masonry...it is not a "portable" material. Is there other options besides one that are superfluous..yeah. Use a green egg or something similar...lightweight metal shell (relative to masonry) with a thin refractory liner.

I have never seen a WFO with a flying buttress, that must have been one heck of an oven..with a huge open space underneath.
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  #13  
Old 02-20-2013, 03:31 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

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Originally Posted by wotavidone View Post
Or there is the "Big Green Egg" thing. I've never seen one of those, I guess you must be able to move them?
Even the small one is heavy as heck!
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  #14  
Old 02-20-2013, 04:53 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

In the first place, pizza is not a food you make at a picnic or tailgate. Dough, cheese, assorted ingredients that need to be kept at controlled temps, plus the variety of implements (peel, cutter, make table at the minimum) make it impractical. Save the pizza for home and cook appropriate foods for the activity.
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:06 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

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Originally Posted by stonecutter View Post
Again, masonry has its limits when you add motion to the equation. You need mass when you are building with masonry...it is not a "portable" material. Is there other options besides one that are superfluous..yeah. Use a green egg or something similar...lightweight metal shell (relative to masonry) with a thin refractory liner.

I have never seen a WFO with a flying buttress, that must have been one heck of an oven..with a huge open space underneath.
Thanks again stonecutter!

I have to confess, I have been away from home for too long! So I don't know what a green egg might be!

Last time home, I saw that proportion sizes had increased though! Big Gulp, super Big Gulp.. But the size didn't make it taste better.

And no--I haven't seen flying buttress ovens either, but there are some big builds out there... lots of wood to fire one of those things up!

Old "Lone Ranger" and "Tonto" discussion--"Tonto says--you white man build big fire and stand far away, us ind jun make small fire and sit close!" both same warm! And no ethnic or racist slurrs intended! Just a different way of looking at things.
Economies of proper sizing!
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  #16  
Old 02-20-2013, 05:21 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

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Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
In the first place, pizza is not a food you make at a picnic or tailgate. Dough, cheese, assorted ingredients that need to be kept at controlled temps, plus the variety of implements (peel, cutter, make table at the minimum) make it impractical. Save the pizza for home and cook appropriate foods for the activity.
Hello Tscarborough!
I guess I'm just a trouble maker, I suppose then that some of the "meals on wheels" pizza ovens should be left at home? That is 100% sarcasm!

At the risk of being "tarred and feathered" and "run out of town on a rail", you could always use distant cousin to home made called "Frozen in the box Pizza"!
Wow!

My foolish "for examples" are drawing us away from the topic of how thin we can go? I have to check out the green egg thing. But if it is too heavy to move, then that eliminates it as well--Just have to go for something smaller --it is amazing what different people cook in WFO's
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  #17  
Old 02-20-2013, 05:23 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

What I really like about this forum are the people with "active imaginations" and their ability to think outside of the box!
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  #18  
Old 02-20-2013, 05:37 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

Here you go

Big Green Egg - The Ultimate Cooking Experience

Way too heavy to cart around though.
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  #19  
Old 02-20-2013, 05:55 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

An oven on a trailer is a small (but expensive) portion of the gear needed to produce pizza, and I can promise you no one is dragging one to the beach to cook a couple of pizzas, and it is not because of the oven.

When I camp, I cook extravagantly, but pizza is not something I would even consider. Thinking outside the box is making scrambled eggs in a ziplock bag in a pot of boiling water, building an inground rock oven to cook a chunk of dead pig, or oysters casino 15 minutes fresh from the water.
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  #20  
Old 02-20-2013, 06:37 PM
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Default Re: Castable - How thin can you go?

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Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
An oven on a trailer is a small (but expensive) portion of the gear needed to produce pizza, and I can promise you no one is dragging one to the beach to cook a couple of pizzas, and it is not because of the oven.

When I camp, I cook extravagantly, but pizza is not something I would even consider. Thinking outside the box is making scrambled eggs in a ziplock bag in a pot of boiling water, building an inground rock oven to cook a chunk of dead pig, or oysters casino 15 minutes fresh from the water.
I'm pulverizing some stone now, and hearing dings being produced by computer as the morning mail comes in.

I am a very simple person "the statement about thinking outside the box" was not intended as a criticizm, simply a few words of "joy" because so many people who frequent this forum have ideas that are sometimes different from the "norm". All the things --as far as cooking or baking tips, I would really like to hear more about!

Being in a foreign land, I have little opportunity to speak with people in English to express ideas. Most of the time, I have to try to explain the benefits of using imported North American products in the construction of " 2x4 Imported homes- I'm not a salesman but have been building for over 40 years. Now trying to do in in another language and teaching Japanese tradesmen how to install the products properly. It's a challenge-and I loose my English communicating abilities.

Funny thing--brick is rarely used here, it doesn't even have a "fire rating" for use as an exterior surface. If you want to add it in a wall assembly, by building code, you first have to use a rated siding--then apply the brick! Crazy right!
Further, rebar has to be run through the holes of the brick as you build! Also brick ties must be used to tie it back to the structure!

Brickie of Oz would be swearing up a storm and throwing mortar in all directions--trying to set a brick without tapping it! There is practically "zero production" if a brickie wants to lay brick here!

The alternative used here is "tile" - glued to the surface. Or if you want the real appearance of brick---they have tracks that are attached to the walls then the thin "special brick" is slid into the tracks. After mortar joints are produced by bagging the grout in!
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