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  #31  
Old 06-15-2012, 07:39 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

I planned to start my arch tomorrow at 0600 but now considering building in a heatbreak as well after reading your thread and a few others. Decisions decisions, going to take some scotch and another cigar... Good luck on your progress tomorrow, waiting to see more pictures.

- Jonathan
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  #32  
Old 06-16-2012, 09:03 AM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Looking what did you use for the exterior cladding? happy progress today.
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  #33  
Old 06-16-2012, 11:49 AM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

i like it!
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  #34  
Old 06-16-2012, 03:20 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Looks good, but your closers are looking small, try and keep them to more than a 1/4 of the full size brick. Cut two a little instead of having a chip.
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  #35  
Old 06-16-2012, 04:35 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

When I have to make a series of similar cuts on a brick saw, I use the waste piece from the "model" as the wedge under subsequent brick.
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  #36  
Old 06-17-2012, 04:55 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Hi Russell,

I just came across your build and from what i saw great job. I just finished my pour for a foundation and chose to put my oven on a angle as well. since i have not seen too many people chose this option, i was wondering if you could share some pics of the build. I am really interested in the your block layout. Thanks in advance...

Joe
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  #37  
Old 06-17-2012, 07:49 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Clever jig. I like how you turned the brick on it's side to do the cutting. that will make getting it under the saw much easier!

Only thing I can think of is that you might want to put a stop for the outside edge of the brick so you can get the width consistent
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  #38  
Old 06-17-2012, 10:26 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Something like this might work. Rig up a piece of wood that would fit over your pivoting part of the jig that can go under the C-Clamp and act as a stop. That way the C-clamp can hold both your pivot angle and your stop position. If you make the lower square of wood big enough, you shouldn't have any problem with it staying in place
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Wood Fired Beehive in Utah-jig-stop.jpg   Wood Fired Beehive in Utah-jig-stop-2.jpg  
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Last edited by deejayoh; 06-17-2012 at 10:28 PM. Reason: add second view of drawing
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  #39  
Old 06-18-2012, 06:32 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
Thanks Gulf,

Going to serious consider removing Foamglas and CaSi under outer arch base course and start arch on concrete hearth.

Working on inner arch today and it is a slow and tedious process. I layed the first course and will post some pics tomorrow. Beer time.

Russell
Russell,
I was out of town for a couple days for a funeral and only home for one hour when I made that knee jerk response. I just returned home from a wedding this weekend and have thought about this very much. When I first started laying out my arch out, I recognized that the arch might be unstable on top of the calsil. With 4" of vcrete to fall back on I decided to transfer that weight to it. In my response I was thinking solely about conserving the heat in the oven and that heat retention in the entry was not necessary since it was separated by the heat break.
However, I did not think about how much heat might be transferred to the concrete hearth (which has gravel embedded). Some gravel has trapped moisture or air pockets. Which ever it is, I have seen gravel pop (explode) in camp fires, and also cause the spaulding which is visible in most house fires on slabs.
Your, concern about building on an unstable foundation for the heatbreak arch is correct in my opinion. I do now recommend that the there be at least 2" of vecrete and or pearlcrcete between the concrete and the "heat break arched entry". I am not sure how much heat can be transferred through the arch to the concrete during nuclear fireups, but some form of a stable insulation would be a good idea.
I still do not think that (with the use of a heat-break arch and floor entry) that the enty has to be insulated to the high standard as the oven. In my opinion the glass and calsil can end at the oven arch. V or Pcrete could be used for the entry. If you decide to remove the calsil and glass for the arch I would do so for the whole entry. At the very least I would replace the glass level with vcrete and step down as I did for the arch. I have layed the fire brick directly to the concrete on many BBQ pits, but never on a fire place, and (since this is my first WFO) never on a pompeii. The amount of heat which can be transferred to the aggreagate in concrete directly through firebrick may not be of a concern, but it is above my paygrade and would like to hear others experience on the subject.
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  #40  
Old 06-18-2012, 07:14 PM
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Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Russell
I learned to use Sketchup so I could design my backyard and pizza oven. I guess I am not dragging any legacy of being a draftsman. But you have some mad skills, that is for sure.

On Gulf's suggestion - the compressive strenght of insulating firebrick is surprisingly high. I'd look into that as a stable layer between your outer arch and the hearth. It's not the best insulator (e.g. not as good as Ceramic Fiber board) but it is probably more than sufficient given a) your flue arch is going to be separated from your oven by an air gap and b) the IFB is going to be a couple inches lower than your oven floor next to your glass board. So whatever heat crosses the gap, very little of it will ever migrate down (heat rises and all) to the floor. I doubt you'd ever see 200 degrees where your firebrick met the IFB

here's a site I found with some specs on compressive strength: Insulating Firebrick Physical Properties, InterSource USA, Inc

The lowest grade of IFB has Cold crushing strength of 260lbs per square inch. So if I am understanding correctly, each 9 x 4.5 inch brick will support about 1000 pounds. Put one on each side and your vent can weigh a ton.
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