Go Back   Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community > Pizza Oven Design and Installation > Pompeii Oven Construction

Like Tree76Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #131  
Old 06-25-2012, 06:52 PM
Gulf's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 1,579
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Russell,
I am not totally sure what you are describing. If you build a decorative face as I see in your drawing, buttressing can be as simple as laying up a decorative brick form and pouring it full of 5 to 1 vcrete. There are other options out there. If you can draw a top view, maybe myself and others can get a better perspective and a better answer .
I would separate the face brick from the outer arch as drawn with a heat break though.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #132  
Old 06-25-2012, 07:05 PM
Les's Avatar
Les Les is offline
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Carson City, NV
Posts: 2,838
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
Gulf,

I your opinion, if I were to build a decorative brick buttress the width of the outer arch (say 4") and butted up against the outer arch would this be enough support or would I need to have a buttress the depth of the outer arch to the inner arch.
Russel,

What are you going to have behind (toward the dome) of the decorative brick? I had core's and dropped some steel in them. Really not sure if it was needed but I sleep well at night.
__________________
Check out my pictures here:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving isn't for you.
Reply With Quote
  #133  
Old 06-25-2012, 07:44 PM
Tscarborough's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ausitn
Posts: 3,041
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

The reality is that the entry area gets massive amounts of heat from the exhaust gasses up the flue. A thermal break at the inner arch is a waste of time other than for residual heat. My idea was to insulate that area, and create a thermal break at the outer arch, although I minimized it at the inner arch as much as is practical.

For buttressing, the safe non-calculated method is twice the mass you are buttressing at a minimum.
Reply With Quote
  #134  
Old 06-26-2012, 06:17 AM
UtahBeehiver's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 1,866
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Thanks everyone, lots of great opinions and ideas. I keep wavering back and forth, should I install an inner arch thermal break or should I not. Since I am not enclosing the oven, any buttressing I want to look good yet provide the mass needed for support. Did not realize "rule of thumb" is twice the mass in the buttressing as the area being buttress. Without getting out my old Statics Load book and relearning, rule of thumb works for me. Thanks guys.
__________________
Russell

Experiences are the names I call my mistakes!

Link to my build -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


My Picassa Picture Log
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #135  
Old 06-26-2012, 09:50 AM
UtahBeehiver's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 1,866
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amac View Post


...and the rain is starting and the wind is blowing, and your back is aching ,and your fingers are sore.

The ovenbuilders alternative to:

"Summertime and the living is easy .. fish are jumping and the cotton is high"



This is a problem on the vertical joints though if you cut too much angle. i guessed for the second row that the angle would be greater than the first, and it isn't - and I had the entire row cut I ended up turning some of them backwards to compensate. The lesson I took was - better too small an angle than too large.
Interesting, this did not occur to me until I started another course and did a trial cut, though well, I will bump up the bevel angle to compensate for the next course. Did not work, too much bevel angle, ended up reverting back to the same bevel angle to work. Lesson learned, well maybe..........
__________________
Russell

Experiences are the names I call my mistakes!

Link to my build -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


My Picassa Picture Log
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #136  
Old 06-26-2012, 12:23 PM
Amac's Avatar
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ireland
Posts: 358
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Quote:
this did not occur to me until I started another course and did a trial cut, though well, I will bump up the bevel angle to compensate for the next course. Did not work, too much bevel angle, ended up reverting back to the same bevel angle to work. Lesson learned, well maybe..........
When you say the bevel angle I take that to mean the angle of the vertical joints - that should get bigger ok. I was talking about the angle from inside to outside which Dennis(deejayoh) has figured that the way to estimate the angle is to divide 180 by the number of bricks in that row. It sounds about right and that way the angles will get bigger as you get towards the top - i.e 180/32 = approx 6 for the bottom rows.
Reply With Quote
  #137  
Old 06-26-2012, 12:31 PM
UtahBeehiver's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 1,866
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Thanks for the clarification, I have been finding the angle (so far up to course 3) has stayed consistent at 6 degrees. I thought the bevel would change more but it is a slight bump up if any, at least thru course 3, abt 1 degree. This may change as I do my trial cuts for course 4. Thanks again.
__________________
Russell

Experiences are the names I call my mistakes!

Link to my build -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


My Picassa Picture Log
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #138  
Old 06-28-2012, 02:12 PM
Apprentice
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Eastern Idaho
Posts: 174
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Hey Russell,

How in the world did you get those nearly perfect angles on the cinder blocks for your wood storage area? I have been using an angle grinder with a diamond blade on it and it is not looking nearly as good as yours. Admittedly this is pretty much my first time ever using an angle grinder so my skills are not great but I hoped that they would look better than what I have done so far.

Thanks,
Nate
Reply With Quote
  #139  
Old 06-28-2012, 02:18 PM
UtahBeehiver's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 1,866
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Hi Nate,

Trade secret......I used a 10" HF wet saw. What are you going to use to cut your bricks? I can be done with an angle grinder but it will be alot of work.
__________________
Russell

Experiences are the names I call my mistakes!

Link to my build -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


My Picassa Picture Log
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #140  
Old 06-28-2012, 02:18 PM
texman's Avatar
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Amarillo, Texas
Posts: 587
Default Re: Wood Fired Beehive in Utah

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompeii Nate View Post
Hey Russell,

How in the world did you get those nearly perfect angles on the cinder blocks for your wood storage area? I have been using an angle grinder with a diamond blade on it and it is not looking nearly as good as yours. Admittedly this is pretty much my first time ever using an angle grinder so my skills are not great but I hoped that they would look better than what I have done so far.

Thanks,
Nate
Sorry to jump on Nate and Russell, but try a diamond blade in a circular saw if you have one. REALLY loud and nasty, but makes smooth cuts without water.
tracy
__________________
My Progress:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
buying firewood? nice article to read. michelevit Firing Your Oven 9 05-10-2011 09:15 PM
Gaz wood fired oven COMBINATION hazemalard Commercial Pizza Ovens 1 01-13-2009 08:17 AM
Wood suppliers in Utah james Firing Your Oven 4 11-28-2008 04:00 PM
custom wood fired spit roasting simonwilde Introductions 4 06-17-2008 06:11 PM
Wood Fired Grill james Getting Started 6 07-09-2005 02:05 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:30 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC