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lenneest 07-19-2009 07:35 PM

Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and idea
 
I built an oven with a 48" diameter and it doesn't seem to hold heat very well. It takes forever to get up to temperature, less so now that summer is here. Initially I thought it was a crack in the dome, perhaps it still is but regardless, I don't think the oven floor gets hot enough. It seems the oven is mostly top heat. I can cook pizza in 4 minutes or so, but don't like the lack of bottom heat. I am thinking about removing the fire bricks and some of the vermiculite layer beneath and putting in a couple of burners and connecting them to a propane take. I will vent the area and figure out a way to light them. But my idea is to put the pipes in and then pour a floor made out of refractory concrete. The whole thing will be tricky as I gave to get the bricks out, enough of the vermiculite/cement insulation layer to lay some burners in, then get the poured concrete slabs (2 slabs) through the oven door. I plan to set them right on the fire bricks that I will leave around the edges. I still plan on building a fire, just want the additional bottom heat. Am I crazy for attempting this? I just find the current oven very inefficient. Any advise would be helpful.

Oz Bakery 07-19-2009 08:11 PM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
What type of wood are you using to fire it with?

MK1 07-19-2009 09:52 PM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
Is insulation an issue? How much do you have and is it dry? I have no idea what your situation is, but it might be easier to address the insulation. What temp do you read on the dome and the floor?

Mark

dmun 07-20-2009 03:11 AM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
As always, gas in enclosed domes is a potential recipe for disaster. 48 is a huge oven, and needs a huge fire. You need a lot of insulation, and it has to be bone dry. In cooking, your floor heat is recharged from the dome, and this is done with a fire that is flaming up the wall of the dome.

Four minutes is forever in wood fired pizza land. Is your wood dry? Does all (or almost all) the carbon burn off your dome?

lenneest 07-20-2009 07:44 AM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
Hi...I do use dry wood...it just takes a butt load to get it hot. The temp on the floor is only about 650 but the temp is higher in the dome..this is after 2 hours of a big fire.

lenneest 07-20-2009 07:46 AM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
Well, I am going to check to see if there is a leak in the dome...but I have 4" of the vermaculite cement under the firebricks...around the dome I have vermaculite and then cement board and rock.

DrakeRemoray 07-20-2009 08:28 AM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
It is not always how LONG you fire the oven, but how BIG the fire is. As Dmun said, 48" is a really big oven...how big is your fire and is the dome turning completely white?

Drake

wlively 07-20-2009 08:44 AM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
Also, how thick is your floor? 1 layer flat bricks, on sides, ect. And how tall is your dome?

Ken524 07-20-2009 09:19 AM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by wlively (Post 60030)
Also, how thick is your floor? 1 layer flat bricks, on sides, ect. And how tall is your dome?

...and how much insulation is under the floor?

Two hours isn't a long time to fire an oven. I usually fire my 42" oven for at LEAST 2.5 hours before cooking.

A cold floor is typically a symptom of poor insulation underneath or inadequate fire.

My guess is that it would take a LOT of propane to get an oven to temperature. Much more costly than wood. I'm with Dmun; I don't think it sounds safe.

Let's see if we can troubleshoot your problem before working on the solution.

RTflorida 07-20-2009 01:45 PM

Re: Thinking about replacing my firebrick floor with refractory concrete and gas-and
 
I'm leaning towards your fires not being big enough.....there is big, then there is scare the wife, friends, and neighbors big - that is what my 36" oven needs. I have to believe a 48" oven requires a fire the equivelent of the 3rd dimension of hell...in other words, you should be stepping back saying WOOOOOOW, HOLLY SCHVIT!!!!!!!!!!!!DID I JUST LOSE MY EYEBROWS???

RT


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