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  #11  
Old 02-12-2014, 11:15 AM
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Location: Western North Carolina, USA
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

Here's an updated photo of the worksite. Plenty more white stuff to come, they are saying. Should warm up by the weekend, though.
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  #12  
Old 02-14-2014, 08:54 AM
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Location: Western North Carolina, USA
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

Here is a photo of a little fire pit base I did here last year, showing the decorative concrete coping I did w/plain ol' concrete mix. This is what I will do in the wood storage area when I pour my base slab. It is basically what is commonly called stamped concrete and is easy to do. When people see it, they can't believe it's just concrete, made to look like real "stone". A real money and labor saver, for those on a budget.
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  #13  
Old 02-14-2014, 02:42 PM
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

Cool.......looks great, nice work! Are they poured in place or cast then set ?

Look forward to following your build.
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Old 02-14-2014, 03:37 PM
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

It is actually formed and poured in place plain old concrete mix. I ran (2) #3 (3/8") rebar throughout. It is plenty strong, being one continuous piece. I didn't need to, but when I hand mixed it, I added a bit of Portland I had on hand, just to beef it up. On my build, I plan to do some of the same type of work, but on the front (vertical) side. That is done totally different, but is basically achieving the same look.
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Old 02-14-2014, 06:02 PM
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

The forms must have to be pulled off soon after a firm set up?
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Old 02-14-2014, 06:51 PM
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbartman View Post
The forms must have to be pulled off soon after a firm set up?
Not really. The day of pouring, all you have to do is the top surface. I prefer pulling the forms the next day, while the concrete is still green, since the sides get parged w/some color hardener mix, then the joints are worked in to match the top. I just round off the edges w/a concrete edger the day of the pour, then blend the edge the next day w/the parging, etc. In other words, the sides get a coating of mix, then the joints worked into that, imitating a joint. Working w/the release agent makes it all come together. Hope this makes sense. When I do the slab pour, I'll post photos. It really is fairly simple, although I may make it sound complicated.
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Old 02-15-2014, 04:11 PM
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

I have been working on my drawings for my hearth slab. I wanted to ask of few of you experienced builders if you were happy leaving 6" for a vent landing and 12" for an oven landing, per FB plans. Or, "if you had it to do again", what would you change in this area, if anything? That seems a bit tight to me. Not being able to see it in front of me, but just in a drawing, it just seems tight. Any pros/cons to those measurements? I am tight on my space, so I am doing what I can to keep it as small as I can, but I have the room, if need be, to expand forward a bit. Just wanted some experienced input.
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  #18  
Old 02-16-2014, 08:20 AM
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

Like so many things the answer is - "it depends". It depends on the size of the oven you are planning to build and the type (geometry) of the chimney material you are planning to use. If you are building a 42" oven an 8" chimney vent is recommended - and your instincts would be correct - a 6" vent landing would be too small. If you are building a 36" or smaller oven 6" might be ok (assuming you design a good transition from the vent chamber to chimney).

BTW I like your cement work too.

Regards,
AT
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Old 02-16-2014, 09:11 AM
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

Thanks, AT. I plan on around a 34-36" oven. It just doesn't seem to me to be enough room, especially for the vent landing. The oven landing is more of a personal preference, I guess, whereas the vent landing is more of a structural thing. I guess I'm going to keep looking at other builds on here and see what looks good. All I'm doing now is planning my slab sizes. Thanks again, for your opinion and the compliment.
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  #20  
Old 02-16-2014, 10:51 AM
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Default Re: Starting my WFO in N. Carolina

After talking it over w/my better half and doing some layout at the site, we have decided to make it a 32", leaning towards a Neapolitan design. W/limited space, the smaller size helps and it would be plenty big enough for our intended use.
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