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  #111  
Old 09-17-2013, 01:48 AM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

They look like Class B Engineering bricks to me, well, that's what they are in UK.
If they are similar, they'd be fine for any part of a Wood fired oven and have been used by oven builders over here. There are also Class A bricks which are usually dark blue or black in colour due to being fired to higher temperatures.
Super hard, very dense, highly resistant to frost and don't take up too much water.

Should be fine for an outer arch and chimney, as that's what they say they are for!

Can mortar stain quite easily though, so you need to be a bit more careful and clean with the bricklaying and even having a small sponge and bucket of water can be helpful.

Good Luck!
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  #112  
Old 09-17-2013, 06:50 AM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

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Originally Posted by Southboom View Post
I'm just about to put a last layer of stove polish on the outer iron cast door. I have been experimenting a little, i read somewhere on a swedish web site that you could use raw linseed oil mixed with turpentine ("balsam terpentin" in swedish) I don't really know what the "balsam" stands for. If anyone may know what this means, and the correct word in English, i would be glad to hear it.

Anyway, the mixture was 5 raw linseed oil : 1 balsam terpentin. The cast iron will absorb this and become saturated. Preferably one shall heat up the iron before doing this. I did miss this step, read about it afterwards.
linseed, venetian balsam and turpentine are mixed together to form a protective varnish. My guess is that you are being sold a solution of venetian balsam and turpentine.
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  #113  
Old 09-17-2013, 08:59 AM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

Balsam is a type of fir tree { christmas tree} that they are making the turpentine from....Cast iron isn't going to absorb it any way, at least not enough to form a lasting protection with heat and outside conditions. Get back down to the iron and paint it with high temp. If one were to mix turpentine/linseed oil/ and parrafin and heat it carefully till uniform it makes a decent finish for wooden gun stocks. This type of finish was used on military weapons in WW2. Venetian balsam is used as a fixative, generally is the perfume industry, and I think it comes from a different plant.
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  #114  
Old 09-18-2013, 12:35 PM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

Just season it like a cast iron pan, with Lard and heat?
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  #115  
Old 09-19-2013, 08:54 AM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

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Originally Posted by Bookemdanno View Post
They look like Class B Engineering bricks to me, well, that's what they are in UK.
If they are similar, they'd be fine for any part of a Wood fired oven and have been used by oven builders over here. There are also Class A bricks which are usually dark blue or black in colour due to being fired to higher temperatures.
Super hard, very dense, highly resistant to frost and don't take up too much water.

Should be fine for an outer arch and chimney, as that's what they say they are for!

Can mortar stain quite easily though, so you need to be a bit more careful and clean with the bricklaying and even having a small sponge and bucket of water can be helpful.

Good Luck!
This is shit good!, as we say in Sweden, now i don't have to worry about being short on firebricks.
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  #116  
Old 09-19-2013, 10:25 AM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

To mrchipster and thickstrings, thanks for the information. That clarified some of my reflections.

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Originally Posted by thickstrings View Post
Balsam is a type of fir tree { christmas tree} that they are making the turpentine from....Cast iron isn't going to absorb it any way, at least not enough to form a lasting protection with heat and outside conditions. Get back down to the iron and paint it with high temp...
I'm afraid you are right, just as I also touched on the topic. When outside and exposed to extreme heat this maybe isn't the right solution, when using linseed oil. The only thing I know is that it's been practiced on ironworks and hinges, maybe for hundreds of years. The linseed was burned in. That or tar, it gave the iron a good protection against rust. Something i learned from the blacksmith that i practiced by. The stove polish contains natural waxes which makes it water repellent. But thats probably more suited for indoor use.

Here's a good survey on the subject: Restoring Your Antique Wood Stove-Polish Or Paint? | eBay

I always thought that cast iron was microporous or at least porous, and that it at least had pretty good absorbency. But now i have taken a closer look on the subject, and it apears that it may be a casting defect.

This link is also interesting: Linseed oil finish? - SmokStak

The only thing i'm worried about is "Once it's on there it's hard to get off (for painting, for example)"
Because, i think i'm gonna go with the heat resistant spray paint. And then maybe put some stove polish on the oudside of the door, just to get that graphite look, carefully so that i won't stain the bricks. As i mentioned, there will be a tarp put over the stove in the worst rain periods and in the winter, something my father has stated that he want to have.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thickstrings View Post
...If one were to mix turpentine/linseed oil/ and parrafin and heat it carefully till uniform it makes a decent finish for wooden gun stocks. This type of finish was used on military weapons in WW2. Venetian balsam is used as a fixative, generally is the perfume industry, and I think it comes from a different plant.
You always learn something new every day, thanks.
As a cabinet maker, we use both linseed oil and parrafine oil and also turpentine, a lot. Linseed oil with a dash of turpentine to penetrate and saturate the wood, for furnitures and countertops. Then finish it whit a hard wax or hard wax oil. I perfer this over varnish although this requires higher maintenance. If one would practice this, don't forget to throw the rags in a safe place because of the chances of spontaneous combustion.

Parafine oil for cutting boards, because of the odor and tasteless properties. Also it's harmless for humans, but i wouldn't drink it.

We use boiled linseed oil, it will harden faster. But i've heard that raw linseed oil has smaller particles, this will make it penetrate deeper into the wood.

Another thing i've heard but not practiced myself is that if you would put a piece of wood (don't know about lenght), with the end grains in the linseed oil. The next day the linseed oil would have soaked the whole piece of wood.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookemdanno View Post
Just season it like a cast iron pan, with Lard and heat?
This is good for seasoning cast iron kitchenware. I also read that flaxseed oil could be used for this, and like linseed oil, they both derive from the same plant. I don't know about a cast iron door for outside use though.

Pardon my french, or at least my english.

Last edited by Southboom; 09-19-2013 at 11:08 AM.
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  #117  
Old 09-19-2013, 12:41 PM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

There is to much cooking shows airing on tv these days, but this is one i will watch for shure.

Niklas is one of the more promising new shooting stars in the swedish food scene. He uses a lot of firewood. You can read about it here: About us Ekstedt

I must point out that i don't know him, nor do i work for him, and i don't even make cutting boards for his restaurants. Maybe something i should look up.

The reason i wan't to share this video is because of it's contents. It's because of the mad guy that's mastering the WFO. I to have some respect for him.

Niklas is not much of a viking

I hope this video will work, first time ever uploading a video on youtube.

YouTube

Last edited by Southboom; 09-20-2013 at 12:11 AM.
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  #118  
Old 09-19-2013, 12:55 PM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

Now I'm even more psyched to finish my oven.

I will post more progress tomorrow. The weather hasn't really been on my side. But there are some minor updates.
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  #119  
Old 09-21-2013, 01:06 AM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

There's a few tv shows now in the UK about scandinavian cooking now too.
Its an area of the world i've always loved, and wanted to visit. Plenty of space!
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  #120  
Old 09-21-2013, 12:07 PM
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Default Re: Somewhere in the slumering suburbs of Stockholm

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Originally Posted by Bookemdanno View Post
There's a few tv shows now in the UK about scandinavian cooking now too.
Its an area of the world i've always loved, and wanted to visit. Plenty of space!
Space is always nice, i'm actually gonna celebrate my birthday at Ekstedt in a few week, if tables are available. I can report on this further on.

#1: The barnum or call it party tent has given ground because of the heavy rain lately.

#2: Poor quality.

#3 and #4: The vermicrete had cured well and was set firm and nice. It is a very brittle material and i managed to break one corner. I just put on some refractory mortar and pushed it back in place. I have these 3 points where there will be minimum insulation, the doom will start on the floor. Thereupon when it rises, I'm gonna go with sufficient insulation. Probably 4 inches of vermicrete.

#5: One day after work i wen't down lakeside to the Bolinder factory that i have mentioned before. They made castings and cast iron products when it came to pass. It's really close to where i work. I like this place, kinda reminds me of Newcastle or some other Brittish coastal town. I dates back to the beginning of the last century.

6: Nice round archway or what you would call it.

On monday or tuesday im gonna use a primer and then plaster the stand, need more strucual on the vermicrete and for the upcoming weather.
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Last edited by Southboom; 09-23-2013 at 04:01 AM.
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