#21  
Old 08-27-2011, 10:10 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Arizona
Posts: 48
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Can you describe your foundation layout. I'm curious about the extra you have on the side.
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  #22  
Old 08-27-2011, 02:44 PM
Neil2's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 1,374
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

If you are using 1/2 inch rebar, this has an end area of 0.2 sq inches.

If your slab is 5 inches thick, to achieve a rebar percentage of 1% you will need to space your rebar at 8 inches on center both ways. Your long span looks to be under 7 feet, skip the center column.

Every other rebar can bend down into the wall (or tied to a rebar bent out of the wall). The other rebar could also be bent into the wall or be "hooked" at the end (or bent at the end to lie flat). All rebar ends should be embedded in one of these two ways. Dead ended rebar is useless for the first foot or more of its length.

Rebar is cheap. You already have a bending tool.

If you haven't already bought the rebar, you may want to consider 3/8 inch rebar instead of 1/2 inch. It is much easier to bend and cut and will give you a slightly better cover depth in the slab. (If using 3/8 inch rebar, reduce your grid spacing to 6 inches.)

Last edited by Neil2; 08-27-2011 at 03:02 PM.
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  #23  
Old 08-28-2011, 04:16 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Thanks very much to all for the responses and direction - I'll bend the rebar to form a grid, and will remove the center column (yay! more blocks for the rotisserie oven).

Neil - yhea, already bought the rebar, but glad i did. As hard as the damn stuff is to bend, I suspect it will have greater structural integrity for when the next earthquake strikes. I'll bend and sink every span of my grid into each side of the form.

Gritz- The extra block form on the right side of the oven foundation is going to be a rotisserie oven/grill. I was thinking about building a small barrel vault chamber, that could also work as a rotisserie, but am concerned that I don't have enough space in front for a vent. So I'm debating about doing an open top rotisserie, or a true rotisserie oven. I really want to make an enclosed rotisserie out of brick, though, bad.
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  #24  
Old 09-04-2011, 09:53 AM
Mike D's Avatar
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Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Berkeley, Ca.
Posts: 342
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

-Hey Simon here is a picture of my rebar just for fun. I come from a long line of over builders and could not restrain myself with some sort of center support.

-If I was to do it over again, I think I would of done it with shallow wood area in front and a side opening in the back to separate it into two compartments (like Dino and others did). That way you wouldn't have to crawl way into the oven to get wood, and you could use the back side area to store charcoal or something.

Mike
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Simon's 36" LA brick oven-photo-3-2.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-oven-stand-top-view.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-photo-2.jpg  
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  #25  
Old 09-05-2011, 01:00 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Mike - Thanks for the photos, I agree that it is a better design to have the additional storage compartment, as opposed to the one large space underneath the hearth... but seeing as I've rebuilt the whole thing three times already, and spent the amount I had budgeted for block, I'm sticking with the one large wood storage underneath. The rotisserie oven will have a small space for kindling storage underneath the charcoal pit. I'm also thinking now of a system of four to six, depending on size, wood storage squares, on casters, below the pizza oven to rotate the wood around (like one of those puzzles where you move and shuffle tiny squares in two dimensions -having one open space with which to move a square from one of the four cardinal directions into that space, which in turn opens up another space, and so on...)
Still with me? That way I could easily bring a stack of wood from the back of the oven to the front and vice-a-versa.


I'm going to upload in a minute some new photos of a angle iron span I put diagonally across the front of the oven, it was tricky to get the angle for both pieces of iron cut into the blocks with my brick saw - I was just holding the block and using the saw as a stationary grinder, not using the guide tray. DO NOT DO THIS - I managed to accomplish the task without breaking the saw or loosing a finger, but I won't ever quite be so stupid with the tool again. I should purchase a grinder...
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  #26  
Old 09-05-2011, 09:59 PM
Mike D's Avatar
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Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Berkeley, Ca.
Posts: 342
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

I didn't use the angle iron, I poured into a form over the gap. I was having a problem finding the angle iron and liked the idea of changing the plan.
- But keep it up, and don't hurt yourself. That would be a bad story anyway (Yea I cut my arm building a Pizza oven). You would have to make up another story to tell people.

Mike
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  #27  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:57 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Proceeding ahead - my friend Eric came by this evening and we built the interior 2x4 wood form and plywood tray for the hearth. Tomorrow I'll tackle the side forms and those for the rotisserie oven's hearth.

Pictures tomorrow evening of the progress (hopefully )

Question- For the insulation underneath the oven floor, someone have a good vermicrete mix recipe?
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  #28  
Old 03-16-2012, 05:55 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

So, its been about six months since my last post, and boy has there been progress. In addition to completing the dome three days ago, I've also just ordered a 68" section of double wall flue pipe, a spark arrestor, and an anchor plate, plus a second box of 50' insulating blanket.

The dome ended in just about the ugliest fashion I could've imagined, with the cap being three full bricks cut with angles on both sides. You can see in the photos in the following posts how screwed up the top of the dome is, however it is solid- with the last four shims being pounded in with a rubber mallet until it was tight as rock. Hoping that this holds- should I point up the spaces/gaps in the interior?

Ended up putting a little overkill on insulation- the base has 4" of foamglass on the concrete, then on top of the foamglass is 2" of calcium silicate board. The brick dome and cooking floor is then on top of the cal-sil board.

Kind of amazed that it looks as good as it does.
Attached Thumbnails
Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3020.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3033.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3226.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3303.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3410.jpg  

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  #29  
Old 03-16-2012, 05:57 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

below are photos of the interior sides of the dome, arch, and a photo of the amount of sand that filled the dome.
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Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3412.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3414.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3415.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3417.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3418.jpg  

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  #30  
Old 03-16-2012, 06:00 PM
Peasant
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Lakeview Terrace, CA
Posts: 30
Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

photos of the top of the dome - please be kind - she may be ugly, but she is solid.
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Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3419.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3421.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3423.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3434.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_3439.jpg  

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