#11  
Old 08-20-2011, 11:06 AM
GianniFocaccia's Avatar
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Having been around competition swimming pools for over 40 years, it's understood that chlorine needs to be regularly replenished since it degrades in direct sunlight. If your chlorine-laced bricks have been outside in the sun for any length of time the tiny amount of chlorine Chip refers to is just that.
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  #12  
Old 08-20-2011, 01:40 PM
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Thanks again John and George!
I made the trek this morning and hauled 200 bricks by hand to my car from a very nice couples back yard 170 feet down brick steps using two contractor plastic buckets. It took about 15 trips, taking about 7 or 8 bricks in each bucket, two buckets at a time. My back hurts -but worth it.
The bricks are indeed old kiln fired clay brick - owner said they were made over forty years ago by being fired to 3000 degrees. This sounds like they will serve the purpose of my rotisserie oven fine.

Below you can see a shots of a quick mock brick floor for the rotisserie oven, and the stack of bricks.
Oh and the saw arrived! still need to purchase a blade, speaking of which: on the saw it says to use only continuous rim, non perforated or non jagged blades. Basically its going to look like a wicked pizza wheel blade right? I've seen brick blades before, but wanted to know if everyone out there is also using a continuous rim saw blade?

Now that I have the bricks (more fresh new firebrick coming in T-minus: 48 hours) and the saw, I'm starting to hyperventilate a little. hooo.... haaa.... calm down, take it step by step. First I need to get the cores filled and rebar gridded up.

Off to work for now. I'll be making food all night, dreaming of cutting bricks instead.
Attached Thumbnails
Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2892.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2893.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2894.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2895.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2896.jpg  

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  #13  
Old 08-24-2011, 07:00 PM
Peasant
 
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

I cut the oven floor today - a little off in terms of diameter (37" around, instead of 36") will this pose a problem when constructing the oven opening to size for a 36" oven? should I trim the floor to be a true 36 inches?

Also please set my mind at ease that the firebricks I've just been cutting and had delivered look right -they have a darker inner core as seen in the photo below. I don't recall seeing anyone else's brick having this difference, and want to make sure that I do indeed have firebricks.

Another point that I need input on is the rebar formation. I've seen lots of people doing grids of rebar, placed onto the bent rebar in cemented cores.
Is this preferable to bending whole segments to go into the various cores, and having them overlap, as seen in my photo. I want to proceed with filling the cores for my stand with the rebar "grid (more of a fractal in my case)" in place. Will having the rebar touch make the slab weaker? What benefit is there in making the vertical rebar in the cinderblock cores separate from the horizontal grid for the slab? I planned on putting a rebar form in every other core, and two forms in each of the center cores, fanning out accross the foundation (i.e. there will be alot more rebar overlapping than what is seen in the photo). The idea for this overkill of rebar is to help with structural integrity (i.e. earthquakes).

In one of the photos you can see a rebar bender & cutter that I picked up for 80 bucks. Also seen is the larger than expected mess generated by the wet saw. Will the brick dust permanently stain my lawn?
Attached Thumbnails
Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2904.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2905.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2906.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2908.jpg   Simon's 36" LA brick oven-img_2909.jpg  


Last edited by calipizzanapoletana; 08-24-2011 at 07:03 PM.
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  #14  
Old 08-26-2011, 01:43 PM
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Exclamation Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

I need some input, please as to the rebar form I've laid out, will the form seen in the photos above be ok with lots of overlapping rebar spans? Or should I be doing the rebar differently? I want to move ahead with filling the cores with the rebar in place, but am worried that I'm making a fatal error.

Thanks in advance

-simon
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  #15  
Old 08-26-2011, 02:05 PM
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Simon - I'm no expert, so I hope someone will chime in, but I"m concerned about the amount of rebar you are using. It's more or less a free standing slab, so I would think alot more rebar would be appropriate.
Leigh
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Old 08-26-2011, 02:49 PM
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Simon

I would lay out the rebar in a grid pattern. Calculate your rebar volume to total about 1.0 % percent of your slab volume and space it both ways evenly. Put a double bar in wher it spans the entryway.

The "radial" system that you are proposing is somewhat problematic in that you will end up with a mass of rebar crossing in one location and will have difficulty in getting adequate concrete cover on the rebar. Conversely, if some of the rebar is ended before the "centre" then you will have "dead ends" which will contribute much less strength to the reinforced slab.

Bending the rebar down into the concrete blocks, as you have done, is the best practice. Most people put verticals in the wall and bend them down 18 inches or so horizontally to provide an overlap tie to the grid rebar. This is done only to make the rebar placement more convenient. Having the rebar continuous in one piece is actually slightly better but provided you have adequate overlap (12 inches) then either technique if fine.

Last edited by Neil2; 08-26-2011 at 02:57 PM.
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Old 08-26-2011, 03:31 PM
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Quote:
Originally Posted by rodeair View Post
Simon - I'm no expert, so I hope someone will chime in, but I"m concerned about the amount of rebar you are using. It's more or less a free standing slab, so I would think alot more rebar would be appropriate.
Leigh
Re: Simon. Take some cutoff sticks of rebar and send them down the holes. Slush in the holes. Every other is good. then lay out the tray for your slab. Then lay out your rebar. make 6x6 squares. Where your cantiliver is lay rebar 2" parallel to your edge and then run bars 90 degrees to the edge. bring them up 1-2" from the edge and back into the slab with wire. Suspend the bars half deep . I have a 55"x 55" hearth and burnt up 120' with a 12" overhang in the front. I enclosed a pic to reference from . If your worried about those pillers moving, once thier slushed in I doubt you need to tie them together. Remember your going to have about 1800lbs min on top the hearth. My small hearth is 1000lb by it self. I hope this helps.
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  #18  
Old 08-26-2011, 03:52 PM
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Simon - This is a shot of what I did for mine and was a little worried it wasn't quite enough.
Leigh
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Simon's 36" LA brick oven-003.jpg  
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  #19  
Old 08-26-2011, 04:26 PM
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

Simon,

I'm no expert either, but if it were me, I'd remove the center column since it leaves quite a bit of dead storage space. You may want to consider reconfiguring the blocks from that column into a wall that extends from the center of the slab diagonally straight back into the corner. This leaves you with two separate (accessible) usable storage areas under your slab. You will still need to place your rebar in a grid fashion.

John
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  #20  
Old 08-27-2011, 12:34 AM
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Default Re: Simon's 36" LA brick oven

The centre column will become redundant when the slab is cured.
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