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-   -   Round floor for Pompeii Oven (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/round-floor-pompeii-oven-100.html)

Yahoo-Archive 04-11-2005 01:41 PM

Round floor for Pompeii Oven
 
Hello,

I have been thinking about ordering some round floors for Pompeii
Oven builders for a while, and wanted to do a check to see if anyone
is interested. I know Wally wants a commercial size 120cm, and we can
get 90cm (35"), 100cm (39") and 110cm (43") floors.

Anyone interested?

James

Yahoo-Archive 04-11-2005 01:42 PM

What would the cost be for these?

Mike

Yahoo-Archive 04-11-2005 01:43 PM

Yep James,

a good cooking starts from the oven floor.

I've been talking with some pizza consultant a while ago who goes around the world for pizza consulting and*he always take the floors with*him from Italy even if the oven*will be*done*in New Zealand.

The oven floor is a kind of stone different from the other stones in the oven.

Most of pizzeria in Naples are so gelous about their oven floor that they do not want you to even touch the stone.

The oven fllor must be placed on free dry sand and vermiculite or other vulcanic material, for this reason they must be very big and large stones and cannot be replaced with normal firebricks.

A big mistake is to mortar the sand under the floor, and for this reason the oven becomes cold very soon. Just a free mix of sand or other vulcanic material without any water at all and the insulation is Ok. but small firebricks will move and othe floor becomes irregular, so only big big stones like those*made by your italian supplier.

*

*Cheers

Wally

Yahoo-Archive 04-11-2005 01:44 PM

The sand thing is interesting.



I have been told by many builders that the high heat (900F) ovens use sand, and even salt, to hold a great deal of heat and sustain 60 second pizza cooking. Still, I don't think you want or need sand in a residential oven. Sand has a large thermal mass, and takes a lot of time to heat up -- though it really holds heat well once you get it hot. Sand can also absorb water if your oven is outside and not well sealed.



Round floors definitely have fewer joints. You also get to build your dome "around" the floor, not on it, which prevents heat from migrating east-west, and out of the oven chamber.



I will post the rough cost next, so we can plan on whether to bring them in.



James

Yahoo-Archive 04-11-2005 01:45 PM

Between $150-$200.



Let's keep it out there as an option, and if anyone wants one, they can let me know.



James

Yahoo-Archive 04-11-2005 01:45 PM

Yes, I’m good with that. Let us know how and when they’re available at that price.


*


Thanks, James,


*


Michael


Aka PizzaMan


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