#151  
Old 10-20-2005, 01:27 AM
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it's getting there, but it's so windy i can't keep a tarp on it.

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Will you be using a stucco coat, and if so, will you add color?
i'm not quite sure yet, and honestly, i think the final veneer/stucco won't be any time soon. i've got quite a bit on my plate right now, and as soon as this thing is raintight, i've got other worries to tend to. but i am tending toward using the same flagstone that is currently being laid around it, maybe combined with stucco or cob/plaster for a rustic finish.

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Are you planning to leave an access panel?
sounds like a good idea, but doubt it's gonna happen. don't jinx me!
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  #152  
Old 10-20-2005, 07:10 AM
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Question #62 H20 before or after perl-crete cement?

#62

(M) In this site's Instructions, at http://www.fornobravo.com/pompeii_oven/hearth_slab.html it states:

"Prepare the insulating concrete using a ratio of 6 parts vermiculite:1 part Portland cement. Add the water and Portland cement first, then add the vermiculite and mix until you reach a concrete consistency."

================================================== ================================================== =====

(M) But we also read the following from another engineer:

"The vermiculite/perlite need to be mixed with the cement when both are dry. This lets that each vermiculite/perlite grain be totally covered by a cement layer before the water application, equalizing the specific weight of each vermiculite/cement arrange."

================================================== ================================================== ====

(M) Are these two procedures contradictory?

Thanks,

Marcel
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  #153  
Old 10-20-2005, 09:33 AM
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Marcel,

Good point.

When mixing portland and vermiculite by hand, I have found it works best to mix them dry, then add water. The directions were written after some builder experiments with a mixer.

I will re-write the plan page.

James
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  #154  
Old 10-20-2005, 12:02 PM
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Default 4-H Cross over

That is the way we did things in my cooking classes. You mix the dry ingredients separately before you add in the liquids. Most of the recipes I use start with cream the butter, add in the sugar, in a separate bowl combine the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, salt, nutmeg. Then you add in eggs to the butter and sugar mix, and in small increments your dry mix and milk. Yep I love making cookies and breakfast sweets.

So it sounds like one would follow in their fatherís footsteps and mix the dry stuff first before adding water.
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  #155  
Old 10-20-2005, 12:34 PM
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i think in this case, either would work fine. the main point, is that you want the portland cement evenly distributed throughout the mixture, without clumping. the vermiculite/perlite isn't a dry substance which hydrates upon mixing (its porosity does draw in water through, potentially "stealing" it from the portland cement), but rather functions similarly to aggregate in concrete in terms of mixing.

i machine mixed mine for the hearth, and it made perfect sense to do as suggested in the plans--mixing the H2O and P.C. first, because the perlite mixes in so easily once you have your slurry, and it seemed easier to achieve the proper consistency that way.
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  #156  
Old 10-21-2005, 06:27 PM
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walls are up, perlite in...



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  #157  
Old 10-31-2005, 11:24 AM
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Default perlite in/closing up the durarock roof

this took 14 bags (4' cu) of perlite, and could have fit at least 2 more. my guesstimate was 16, but i was trying not to have to return any so i bought short of that #. should've stuck to my intuition. oh well, good enough.



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Last edited by paulages; 10-31-2005 at 11:28 AM.
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  #158  
Old 10-31-2005, 11:27 AM
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Unhappy upper roof goes on

i framed in my roof proper yesterday, and got it sealed up just in time for a torrential windy downpour all night long. i don't have a chimney cap yet, but the retained heat from yesterday's fire kept the landing dry. i still have to build a curb around the edge of the roof, fill it with soil and plant it, but the chimney flashing is on (i used high temp. metal roof to chimney flashing, to get a good seal on my pondliner) and the liner is covering the surface.






there won't be quite that large of an overhang on the side left in the picture.

p.s. check out the sad wet pieces of pizza left out overnight
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Last edited by paulages; 10-31-2005 at 11:30 AM.
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  #159  
Old 10-31-2005, 12:41 PM
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Thumbs up Pizza with Oregone-no

#63

(M) Thasapizza to spice up your life!

(M) I notice the ubiquitous bottle of beer as well in one of the images.

(M) Paul, that suggests you spent close to $200 .... just for the perlite fill. Have you totaled your costs to date? I'm up to about $1,500 ( counting the tile saw, and the angle grinder, etc.) and I haven't even clothed her yet, unless you call a tarp clothing.

(M) For non Oregonians, we in this part of the northwest say you don't tan here, .... you rust.

Chow?

Marcel
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  #160  
Old 10-31-2005, 02:40 PM
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marcel, i'm afraid to tally the bill for this thing, but the perlite cost me $112 for 14 bags.
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