#11  
Old 10-10-2009, 05:11 PM
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Here's a picture of the back of the stand and the rebar for the cantilever. You can also see the back of the house, the deck, and the base for a paver patio. It also gives a view of the concrete board that we used for the ceiling of the wood storage area.

Joe
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  #12  
Old 10-10-2009, 05:18 PM
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Hearth Slab. We next poured the hearth slab, again with 6 bag mix. We bought the concrete from a ready mix place and moved it with a trailer. Because my neighbor had finished his landscaping, we had to wheelbarrow the concrete in from the front and lifted it up with shovels. I had lots of help, so it went pretty fast. We're fortunate to live in a neighborhood where people help each other. When someone lays sod he can expect 25-30 people to show up to help just by sending a couple of emails. It's rather amazing.

Joe
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2009, 05:29 PM
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Floor. I decided I liked the look of the floor inside the dome, so I made a template out of 1/8 inch hard board, pretty much following Dino's as built measurements. The firebrick was surprisingly easy to cut. I had just finished a paver patio, and the pavers were not as easy to cut. I laid the floor on straight sand (no fireclay). The primary reason for that was that I wanted to get it done and didn't want to wait to collect the fireclay from cutting some bricks. I had hoped to avoid the sand altogether by using FB Board as the insulation, but the board varied in thickness by as much as an eighth of an inch either way. So there was no way to avoid the sand. Once I got the bricks level, I laid the template on it and traced it with a pencil. I cut the bricks one at a time and replaced them. I didn't find any difficulty using just sand but I believe if I had it to do over again I would have used fireclay. I did save a five gallon bucket of the stuff for my next oven.

Joe
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  #14  
Old 10-10-2009, 08:39 PM
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Inner Arch. Back when Ken was building his oven and had difficulty with the arch, he buttressed the sides with metal brackets. I started to wonder then about making the sides wider, and since I planned to build a gabled house over it, I decided to experiment. You can see from the pictures that I made the legs two bricks wide. I remember David saying something in a post about mitering the bricks to get more strength while leaving a reveal.

The pictures show the bricks dry laid without mortar along with the soldier course. It's hard to tell from the pictures, but the soldiers are cut with an angle on the top edge. I used the string to figure out the angle. In retrospect, I should have made the angle steeper, to avoid using so much mortar between the soldier and the first course. I would have liked to have used very little mortar, rather than the 3/8 in or so I used on the outside.

Joe
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Joe's Kaysville Utah Oven-img_0408.jpg   Joe's Kaysville Utah Oven-img_0407.jpg   Joe's Kaysville Utah Oven-img_0406.jpg   Joe's Kaysville Utah Oven-img_0405.jpg   Joe's Kaysville Utah Oven-img_0401.jpg  


Last edited by jmhepworth; 10-11-2009 at 02:26 PM.
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  #15  
Old 10-10-2009, 08:48 PM
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After mortaring the sides of the inner arch and the soldier course (and allowing it to cure for a day or two), I added the inner arch. As you can see from one of the pictures, I needed to put the first brick from the first course in to complete the arch.

You can't really see the crack on the left of the keystone on the inner arch, but it bugged me. Once it cured I couldn't knock it loose, so I didn't worry about it. Interestingly, when I got the oven up to temperature, I did get some cracks, including one on the left of the keystone.

Joe
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  #16  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:04 PM
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Dome. After finishing the inner arch, I went on with the dome using Ken's string method. I started using pieces of brick as wedges to hold the brick up but then concluded that the mortar was stiff enough that I didn't need the wedges. I did trim the edge of the bricks to get rid of the skinny triangles. Nothing precise, just nipped off what it looked like it would need. Of course that didn't result in the really clean brick work that others have demonstrated. I tried to clean the bricks after each course. I didn't take as many pictures as I wish I had.

Generally, I tried to use a little mortar on the inside as possible, so that from the inside you can't really tell that there is a 3/8 inch or so gap at the back of the bricks filled with mortar.

The transition to the arch was a bear. I don't think well in three dimensions, so I had to make multiple efforts at getting it to tie in. I don't think I'll share those pictures. And you can see, the dome wasn't particularly round after the transition.

Joe
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Last edited by jmhepworth; 10-11-2009 at 02:27 PM.
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  #17  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:10 PM
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Keystone. This part was fun. I decided to use the brick on the flat side to make the keystone. I held the brick up on the inside while my wife traced the opening of the oven onto the brick. We did the same at the top with her holding the brick and me tracing it from the inside. And since we were using the flat side of the brick, I need a two part keystone mortared together. I thought about leaving it sticking out on top, but that bugged me so I trimmed the last piece to fit flush on the outside.

Joe
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  #18  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:12 PM
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I went back through all of my pictures looking for a picture of the inside of the oven. I can't believe I didn't take a picture of the inside. Darn.

Joe
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  #19  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:20 PM
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I added the outer arch, leaving six inches of opening between the two arches. Because the outer arch was a half inch taller than the inner arch, I needed to add some height to the inner arch and make a flat surface for clay flue tile on both arches. I added one brick on each side in the six inches between the arches and then covered the rest of the opening with firebrick splits, filling the rest of the gaps with mortar.
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  #20  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:29 PM
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More chimney and first fire. I added two more feet of chimney. After that cured for a few days, I started the first curing fire. I'd like to think the curve in the chimney is an optical illusion, but alas you can see I'm not a great mason. As I've said many times in this forum, nothing on this oven is perfectly round, square, plumb or level. But it cooks pizza.

Joe
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