#21  
Old 06-22-2012, 08:09 AM
texman's Avatar
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Default Re: Heatstop 50 offers no strength?

I am using the Alsey flue set, see attached spec sheet. The stuff really gains strength as heat is applied as indicated by the specs. It is around $100/bag with shipping for me from Larkin. Time will tell if it is any better than homebrew, but i doubt it will be. I liked dealing with a ready to go mortar and just adding water. But, if i did it again, i would use homebrew and by some beer with the left over money.
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Last edited by texman; 06-22-2012 at 08:09 AM. Reason: forgot attachment
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  #22  
Old 06-22-2012, 08:33 AM
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Default Re: Heatstop 50 offers no strength?

Quote:
But, if i did it again, i would use homebrew and buy some beer with the left over money.
Make that ALOT of beer
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  #23  
Old 06-22-2012, 04:05 PM
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Default Re: Heatstop 50 offers no strength?

It may be just a communication problem.

The salesman was probably trying to say that mortars in general are not in the structure to provide strength. Mortars serve to transfer compressive strength and (to some extent sheer strength) from one surface to another.

Mortars are not and should not be considered "glue". Any masonry structure should be held together primarily (ideally entirely) by gravity.

Last edited by Neil2; 06-22-2012 at 04:08 PM.
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  #24  
Old 06-22-2012, 04:18 PM
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Default Re: Heatstop 50 offers no strength?

Well it wasn't me he talked to, although I am sure there was some miscommunication involved. The wet refractory that we carry is great for fireplaces but unusable for most ovens (although I used it on mine) and it has no bond strength at all, and will melt if wetted. We carry Heatstop too though, and when someone I do not recognize asks for firebrick or refractory mortar, I always ask if it is for inside work or outside work.
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