#11  
Old 03-10-2012, 10:32 PM
brickie in oz's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Whittlesea
Posts: 3,455
Default Re: Gas conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by david s View Post
Ha, ha, not me.
I was thinking of the old TV show from the 60's when I said that.
Who is number 1? You are.....
__________________
The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-10-2012, 11:53 PM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,828
Default Re: Gas conversion

Thanks, then presumably you're number 2.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-14-2012, 11:21 PM
Faz Faz is offline
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Kent, UK
Posts: 56
Default Re: Gas conversion

Personally I would be very reluctant to introduce gas into a confined space like a WFO, as it will be difficult to ensure the correct mix at the burner. This could lead to serious amounts of CO production, or potentially the flame could become unstable and extinguish. If there is no flame failure device, the burner will continue to pump gas into the space (which is also nice and hot!). Once the oxygen level becomes high enough to permit an explosion then I would not like to be standing anywhere near the oven!

It would be difficult to fit a flame failure detector, as the oven is designed to operate at a high temperature which may make the detector think there is a flame there when there is not.

The only way I would use gas near an oven is during curing when I would consider the use of a blow torch in the entrance way, pointing in to the oven, to assist in the drying process.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-14-2012, 11:51 PM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,828
Default Re: Gas conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faz View Post
It would be difficult to fit a flame failure detector, as the oven is designed to operate at a high temperature which may make the detector think there is a flame there when there is not.
I can't agree. Fitting a burner to an oven would be the same as fitting one to a kiln and as far as the operation of the flame failure device goes, it would be way easier because the kiln goes to about three times the temp of an oven. A flame failure device is mandatory, in our country at least and must be installed by a licensed gas fitter.

Many commercial pizza ovens have gas burners and the wood is really there just to make them look pretty.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-15-2012, 09:34 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,446
Default Re: Gas conversion

We all know that it is possible and done all of the time commercially. The problem being the vast majority of this forums members are backyard builders/DIYers who have had little experience with construction, but a stong desire for pizza. James asked very early on (several year ago) that all discussion be taken off of this forum and requested the moderators police for threads such as this. Its just not a good idea giving advice that could be incredibly dangerous for any who is not a license gas fitter hooking up the required flame failuredetector. No one on the forun wants to be liable for teling a new builder it can be done cheaply, and 3 months later they loose the entire back of the oven

If you must discuss it, please take it offlihe
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-16-2012, 02:07 PM
Mike D's Avatar
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Berkeley, Ca.
Posts: 342
Default Re: Gas conversion

I would like to say that changing a wood oven into a gas one doesn't make any sense anyway. These things are made to use wood. Gas changes the flavor of the food. If you were going to use gas to make pizza than use the oven in your house. I have seen and eaten from the pizza ovens that have been made for gas and they are not the same. The flame just licks up the wall in the back, it's just for show. The gas changes the crust in a funny way. It does this weird caramelizing thing on the crust, and just gives it a faint gassy smell.

-I say why ruin an oven by putting gas in it? You got to work for that smokey wood flavor, or just use the oven in the house (or put in a bad ass deck oven). One can make pretty good pizza with just a pizza stone in a normal home oven.

-But that's just me,
Mike
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-17-2012, 02:54 PM
Neil2's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 1,374
Default Re: Gas conversion

Using wood is also "carbon neutral".
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-17-2012, 05:25 PM
Mike D's Avatar
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Berkeley, Ca.
Posts: 342
Default Re: Gas conversion

I think it's only carbon neutral if the wood decomposes naturally. Burning it I think is a different thing. But I don't really care about that anyway, it's all about the food.

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-17-2012, 06:06 PM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,828
Default Re: Gas conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike D View Post
I think it's only carbon neutral if the wood decomposes naturally. Burning it I think is a different thing. But I don't really care about that anyway, it's all about the food.

Mike
It is still considered carbon neutral as the wood is carbon already "in the system", unlike fossil fuels which are locked away unless withdrawn and burnt. Allowing the wood to decompose rather than burn is probably preferable because there is les CO2 being transferred to the atmosphere.

That still leaves wood as a fuel preferable to using gas or oil as a fuel or electricity (gas or coal fired).

Last edited by david s; 03-17-2012 at 06:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-17-2012, 06:26 PM
Les's Avatar
Les Les is offline
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Carson City, NV
Posts: 2,852
Default Re: Gas conversion

Quote:
Originally Posted by david s View Post
Allowing the wood to decompose rather than burn is probably preferable because there is les CO2 being transferred to the atmosphere.
It's snowing right now, fire up your ovens The dino's didn't burn wood and they are gone. I'm with Mike - lets eat!

Also - RT is right on!
__________________
Check out my pictures here:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving isn't for you.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cement conversion hb2474 Newbie Forum 5 09-01-2010 12:09 PM
Weber Grill Conversion ("Little Black Egg") mako Other Oven Types 5 05-26-2010 11:19 PM
Forno Clamshell - Another Charcoal Grill Conversion... EADavis Other Oven Types 11 01-08-2010 08:39 AM
Oil to gas furnace conversion papavino General Building and Construction 7 12-03-2009 09:28 AM
Yeast Conversion Chart chuckster Artisan Ingredients 1 02-27-2008 11:54 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:42 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC