Go Back   Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community > Pizza Oven Design and Installation > Pompeii Oven Construction

Like Tree2Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 02-14-2014, 03:19 AM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,698
Default Re: Floor Insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCMan View Post
Thanks. Not sure why, but I was not able to open that file.
It was a zipped file and I'm on a mac. Try this one
Attached Files
File Type: zip Vermicrete insulating slab copy.doc 2pdf.zip (73.2 KB, 13 views)
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 02-14-2014, 04:58 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Western North Carolina, USA
Posts: 332
Default Re: Floor Insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by david s View Post
It was a zipped file and I'm on a mac. Try this one
Still can't open, says it's "corrupt". Thanks, anyway. I appreciate the effort.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 02-14-2014, 05:04 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Western North Carolina, USA
Posts: 332
Default Re: Floor Insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenman View Post
I did something similar to what you intend to do. I sized mine so that the finished dome (insulated, rendered etc) ended just over the edge of the vermicrete. That way it is sealed with no way for water to get into the vermicrete other than via the hearth.

I used very thin MDF cut into 4" strips and it bends smoothly and evenly and worked well. When I did this I poured the 4" slab and then boxed the outside up another 4" and formed the keyhole shape on top of that, poured the outside, removed the form and then poured the vermicrete. It is a good idea to have some drainage capacity in the bottom slab to allow any water that enters via the hearth a way out.

Anyway a picture is worth a thousand words. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...size=960%2C720

Good luck with your build. You seem to be on the right track and there is no way you can over research or plan your build.
Steve......thanks. It may have been your pictures that I got the inspiration from. That link, for some reason, would not open, but I get the idea. Thanks again for your help.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 02-14-2014, 02:32 PM
david s's Avatar
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
Posts: 4,698
Default Re: Floor Insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCMan View Post
Still can't open, says it's "corrupt". Thanks, anyway. I appreciate the effort.
OK, We'll try this way then.
Vermicrete insulating slab

The purpose of this experiment was to calculate the water loss from a vermicrete insulating slab after casting and placement.

Materials Kg Vol (L)

Vermiculite 1.82 27.00

Cement 7.25 5.40

Water 8.10 8.10

Total 17.17 21.6

For the aggregate in this mixture a 50% vermiculite 50% perlite proportion was used.
The mix is generally considered a 5:1 vermicrete and comprised of vermiculite, perlite, Portland cement, water 2.5, 2.5, 1, 1.5 by volume.
The form was filled with dry aggregate to obtain required volume, but on mixing and placing in the form, has reduced approx. 20% as some of the grains break down from abrasion during mixing and compaction on placing also reduces volume. The resulting volume reduction is an estimate based on the finished slab thickness.
Mixing was done gently by hand in a barrow.
The compacted slab was covered for one week to allow good hydration.(no additional water was added)
The weather was fine, cloudless, low humidity and the temp in the range of 12- 24 C. The slab was exposed to approx 3 hrs sun/day top surface only.
Weighing of materials was done using digital scales, but weighing of finished slab was done using bathroom spring scales as the weight was beyond my digital scales capacity.

Although the top of the slab appeared quite dry the bottom was still wet so I lifted it up, stood it on edge to assist drying after Day14


Kg
Day 7 16.0 fine
8 15.0 fine
9 14.5 fine
10 14.0 fine
11 14.0 cloudy
12 13.5 cloudy
13 13.5 cloudy
14 13.5 cloudy
21 12.0 fine
28 11.0



Conclusion
Given the ideal drying conditions, relative thinness of the slab and that it was uncovered, the experiment still demonstrates the large quantity of water present and the slow rate of removal. For a thick covered slab expect the water reduction rate to be way lower. After 3 weeks of drying more than 50% of the water had been removed by the weather from the aprox. 2” thick slab. After 4 weeks approx. 75% of the water added had been removed.

In hindsight I probably should repeat the experiment and cover it with firebrick, then compare the results. Given that the water under the floor and the base of the dome is the last to be eliminated and the resulting problems and damage it can cause, the drying of a vermicrete slab before building over it is advisable.

Sorry it's jumbled up the format a bit, but you should still be able to work it out.

Last edited by david s; 02-14-2014 at 02:35 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 02-14-2014, 02:41 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Western North Carolina, USA
Posts: 332
Default Re: Floor Insulation

Thanks, I appreciate that. Very informative. I've never worked w/the material before and this is all a big learning process to me. Thanks again, David.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:22 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
2006/10 Forno Bravo, LLC