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  #11  
Old 02-13-2014, 12:23 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

Gunna have to work on my dough. I can't get cornicione like that. I get a puffed up crust around the outside, but not that good.
I'm thinking a bit wetter (I'm at 60-62%), and a little less handling.
Also our shops finally have typo 00 at reasonable prices.
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  #12  
Old 02-13-2014, 12:35 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

Since you all are on the subject of hearth insulation...If I poured a concrete slab, then set a 2" insulation board, then the hearth bricks, would that work well enough, or is a pour of vermiculite preferred under the insul board? I'm still in my planning stages and wondered about that. I know which way works best, just wondered about the effectiveness of just the insul board under the hearth bricks. Or, could I just beef up the insul board to a double layer, perhaps? Pros and cons?
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  #13  
Old 02-13-2014, 01:33 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

The cal sil board is about twice as good an insulator as vermicrete, but costs more than double vermicrete.
50 mm of it is sufficient IMO, but if you want more it wouldn't hurt.
The cal sil is dry when you place it while vermicrete is wet and the water needs to be removed for it to work. Covering wet vermicrete with calsil will trap the water in and it will take a long time to remove it.

Last edited by david s; 02-13-2014 at 01:37 PM.
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  #14  
Old 02-13-2014, 01:44 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by david s View Post
The cal sil board is about twice as good an insulator as vermicrete, but costs more than double vermicrete.
50 mm of it is sufficient IMO, but if you want more it wouldn't hurt.
The cal sil is dry when you place it while vermicrete is wet and the water needs to be removed for it to work. Covering wet vermicrete with calsil will trap the water in and it will take a long time to remove it.
Thanks. That helps. During normal conditions, how long would be best to let the vermicrete dry before covering it, if I went that route?
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  #15  
Old 02-13-2014, 01:50 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

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Originally Posted by NCMan View Post
Thanks. That helps. During normal conditions, how long would be best to let the vermicrete dry before covering it, if I went that route?
I did some test on this and documented the results. The test was done in ideal drying conditions. Hope this helps.
Attached Files
File Type: zip Vermicrete insulating slab copy.doc.zip (73.2 KB, 23 views)
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  #16  
Old 02-13-2014, 01:52 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

I also was considering forming up, on top of the concrete hearth slab, in the shape of the oven and vent area, a pour of 4 inches of vermicrete. I think it's been done by others on here and that's where I got the idea. It looks like they used a luan plywood bendable form. I would use that or Masonite. I would probably make that pour about 4 inches bigger in area than the footprint of the WFO, to keep from losing heat to the slab, etc. I'm just weighing out my options and trying to get together a game plan. I like to get the pros and cons from you experienced builders, which I am not.
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  #17  
Old 02-13-2014, 01:55 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by david s View Post
I did some test on this and documented the results. The test was done in ideal drying conditions. Hope this helps.
Thanks. Not sure why, but I was not able to open that file.
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  #18  
Old 02-13-2014, 02:00 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

Yes, that's the idea. You can also use some sheet metal cut to height, it is easier to bend. Pop rivet a couple of lengths together if it's not long enough. Clamping the ends together and oiling the inside will make for easier removal.
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  #19  
Old 02-13-2014, 07:23 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCMan View Post
I also was considering forming up, on top of the concrete hearth slab, in the shape of the oven and vent area, a pour of 4 inches of vermicrete. I think it's been done by others on here and that's where I got the idea. It looks like they used a luan plywood bendable form. I would use that or Masonite. I would probably make that pour about 4 inches bigger in area than the footprint of the WFO, to keep from losing heat to the slab, etc. I'm just weighing out my options and trying to get together a game plan. I like to get the pros and cons from you experienced builders, which I am not.
I did something similar to what you intend to do. I sized mine so that the finished dome (insulated, rendered etc) ended just over the edge of the vermicrete. That way it is sealed with no way for water to get into the vermicrete other than via the hearth.

I used very thin MDF cut into 4" strips and it bends smoothly and evenly and worked well. When I did this I poured the 4" slab and then boxed the outside up another 4" and formed the keyhole shape on top of that, poured the outside, removed the form and then poured the vermicrete. It is a good idea to have some drainage capacity in the bottom slab to allow any water that enters via the hearth a way out.

Anyway a picture is worth a thousand words. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...size=960%2C720

Good luck with your build. You seem to be on the right track and there is no way you can over research or plan your build.
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  #20  
Old 02-13-2014, 08:08 PM
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Default Re: Floor Insulation

Thanks Dave,

Yes, I was happy with this session's pies, but have found that I have a lot of learning to do, with the oven as well as dough prep. I plan on sharing my (good and bad) results, but to keep things simple, I think I'll stick to posting pie pics on my OctoForno thread.

John
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