#11  
Old 06-15-2007, 10:12 AM
dmun's Avatar
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Default Re: Firebrick Primer

mine are "red" or reddish and low duty
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  #12  
Old 01-14-2008, 03:39 PM
Serf
 
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Location: Australia
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Default Re: Firebrick Primer

To add my two cents worth..... If using Red clay bricks in the oven dome
Tap each one with trowel if they dont make a ping sound, do not use
them as they already have a fault in the brick.
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  #13  
Old 03-24-2009, 05:40 PM
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Location: Helotes, Texas
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Default Re: Firebrick Primer

OK, I am an idiot.

What is the best, economical way to cut firebrick used to construct to the oven? I am a masonry newbie.

Also, I would like to have a rectangular opening to the oven, rather than an arch. I was planning on using some sort of metal support. What are your recommendations?

I appreciate all the help I have gotten from this forum thus far.

Cheers & Many Thanks,

Joe
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  #14  
Old 04-12-2009, 07:46 AM
Peasant
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: plainville ma
Posts: 28
Default Re: Firebrick Primer

joe we use the red fire brick all the time in fireplaces and i used red fb split s in my oven they work fine with no burn out
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  #15  
Old 12-06-2010, 04:05 PM
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Location: Wilton, CA (Near Sacramento)
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Default Re: Firebrick Primer

I use my De-Walt sliding tilting angleing wood working saw, with a 12" masonry blade from Lowes or Home Depot. I cut the bricks dry.

I have a wet brick cutter, but I wear glasses, and after cutting one brick, my glasses are splattered and I am blind. Forget wet cutting bricks!
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  #16  
Old 12-06-2010, 04:53 PM
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Default Re: Firebrick Primer

Hello Turkey Joe. The easiest way is with a 14" wet saw, but that could be cost prohibitive. What is your plan of construction and size of bricks?
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  #17  
Old 02-13-2011, 09:16 AM
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Location: Garden Bay BC Canada
Posts: 90
Default Re: Firebrick Primer

Seems like a few years back light duty was the recomended brick to use and now I am seeing medium duty recomended from FB in the primer I printed off a while back.
Light duty is half the price of medium duty in my area in Canada and am wondering is it really worth going with the added expense of the medium duty. I am building a 42" pompeii, how much would one notice the difference say in heat up time and temp holding time?
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  #18  
Old 09-12-2011, 09:39 PM
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Location: Sequim wa
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Default Re: Firebrick Primer

i live in washington state and my local supply yard says no one in the state carries anything other than the 2100 deg bricks and all the ovens in the area have been built with his bricks. will using these higher temp bricks really make a difference
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  #19  
Old 11-23-2011, 01:57 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Chelsea
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Default Re: Firebrick Primer

Hi,
I am a total novice regarding brick ovens. I would like to build a Pompeii oven but it has gotten late in the year and winters here in Michigan are very cold. Here is a question concerning the mixing and the curing of the mortar used to cement the bricks together. Can this be done successfully in the winter without compromising the longevity and the structural soundness of the oven ? I will appreciate the advice.

CarlosF
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  #20  
Old 03-08-2012, 05:04 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: etobicoke
Posts: 1
Default Re: Firebrick Primer

Hello I have a question...a brick supplier told me that silicate dust is carcinogenic and therefore should not be used to cook food directly on...does anyone have an opinion on this? Thanks

Last edited by Courtjester!; 03-15-2012 at 04:38 AM.
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