#11  
Old 06-06-2006, 10:47 AM
Fio Fio is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arevalo53anos
Fio:



I hope this question did not be posted to late.

It is not the hearth too big?

When baking the mass is important to retain heat, and so is when heating, consuming more wood or time to reach the target temperature.

You are going to bake only in the inner of the dome oven.

May be you would like to consider to use an island hearth.

By the way, nice work!

Luis
Luis,

Thanks for the question. with the exception of one or perhaps two bricks, every brick on that hearth is either inside the dome, supports the dome, or is part of the landing. I will remove whatever hearth bricks are completely outside the dome. Thanks for the advice.

Plus, I think that the insulation on the bottom (and there will be insulation on the exposed sides) of the hearth bricks will effectively "trap" any heat transfer. So the actual extra mass that will suck heat away outside the dome is fairly small. Does my explanation make sense?

Thanks again.

- Fio
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  #12  
Old 06-06-2006, 06:33 PM
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Thumbs up Very nice job, little brother!!

Being Fio's older brother, and planning on being there for one of his first pies to come out of his nifty, hand-crafted oven, I figured I better get on-board and get involved...

Keep us informed on your progress, and lemme know when I should buy the plane tix...

Brother Vito in Ra-Cha-Cha
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  #13  
Old 06-06-2006, 11:02 PM
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Default Lol

As a younger brother myself, I have to welcome Fio's older brother to our group. Eccellente.

I think this is the first time someone has joined to witness a sibling's progress -- with the prospect of enjoying some great pizza. Ma lei deve montare suo proprio forno. Subito.

Welcome aboard Vito. Good food is in store, but you have to send photos.
James
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  #14  
Old 06-18-2006, 09:02 PM
Fio Fio is offline
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Default To Handle The Aggressive Curve, I used Wedges

My dome design incorporates a sharp change from vertical to sloped. To handle the change, I used a course of wedges.
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Fio's 35" Oven-wedgecourse2.jpg   Fio's 35" Oven-fourthcourse.jpg  
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There is nothing quite so satisfying as drinking a cold beer, while tending a hot fire, in an oven that you built yourself, and making the best pizza that your friends have ever had.

Last edited by Fio; 06-18-2006 at 09:21 PM. Reason: Need to add a picture
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  #15  
Old 06-18-2006, 09:11 PM
Fio Fio is offline
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Default I liked Kiwi Pete's Idea of Casting an Exhaust Manifold

Instead of casting a lintel and a manifold, I used angle iron lintels and plopped my exhaust manifold on top. I'll put a chimney flue on top.

After careful planning using a styrofoam mockup, I built a mold out of leftover styro board from the dome form. Having no access (can you believe it - in Washington, DC?) to alumina cement, I made a "concrete" out of HeatStop mortar and crushed firebrick. What a PIA it is to crush firebrick.

It turned out nice, though. The mortar sets FAST. I threw in a few pieces of 3/8" threaded rod as "rebar." Hope it holds together.
Attached Thumbnails
Fio's 35" Oven-exhaustmold.jpg   Fio's 35" Oven-castingexhaust.jpg   Fio's 35" Oven-mockupexhaustmanifold.jpg   Fio's 35" Oven-filledmold.jpg  
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  #16  
Old 06-18-2006, 09:19 PM
Fio Fio is offline
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Default After Installing the casting, I closed the gap

Casting the exhaust was a LOT of work. I made several mockups and spent a LONG time building the mold.

But once I installed the exhaust casting, I could continue laying bricks, cutting them, and filling out the dome behind the vent. That was my biggest challenge - what will support the bricks behind the vent? The vent itself! I dry fit the bricks for the fifth and sixth courses - probly too much work, but I liked the results. I've worn through three cutting wheels, but the cheap Harbor Freight saw is still going strong.

Cutting the bricks to fit in behind the vent, in a vain attempt to maintain some sort of circularity, was sheer madness. I'm trying too hard or not working smartly.

Things never work out as neatly or cleanly as you plan. Using computers to calculate dimensions of voussoirs means diddly because firebricks are not exact and the human machine cutting the bricks and laying them is vastly flawed.
Attached Thumbnails
Fio's 35" Oven-bridgingthespan.jpg   Fio's 35" Oven-dryfittingfifthcourse.jpg   Fio's 35" Oven-dryfittingsixthcourse.jpg   Fio's 35" Oven-lintelcutouttoimprovedraw.jpg   Fio's 35" Oven-hopeitworksbetterthanitlooks.jpg  

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There is nothing quite so satisfying as drinking a cold beer, while tending a hot fire, in an oven that you built yourself, and making the best pizza that your friends have ever had.

Last edited by Fio; 06-18-2006 at 09:24 PM. Reason: Add more comments
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  #17  
Old 06-18-2006, 10:34 PM
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That is looking great!! You passed me up!

Drake
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  #18  
Old 06-21-2006, 10:23 AM
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Looking good, Fio. Won't be long now.

I am kinda stalled but not for long. Work is getting in the way of pleasure here......
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  #19  
Old 06-21-2006, 12:01 PM
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Default Casting

Your vent casting is very slick. Did you think the angle irons were necessary? You would think the refractory casting would do the trick by itsself.

Your comment on the work to make the form reminds me of the architect that said to make a ferro-concrete house you build a house on the outside, a house on the inside, then after the pour, you tear down the first two houses.
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  #20  
Old 06-21-2006, 03:00 PM
Fio Fio is offline
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Default Nice observation about the casting!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmun
Your vent casting is very slick. Did you think the angle irons were necessary? You would think the refractory casting would do the trick by itsself.

Your comment on the work to make the form reminds me of the architect that said to make a ferro-concrete house you build a house on the outside, a house on the inside, then after the pour, you tear down the first two houses.
I needed the angle iron to rest the casting on. The casting itself was not wide enough to span the gap in between the uprights of the entrance. I considered making it bigger, but I didn't want to make it too big and risk cracking.

The comment about the casting is correct. I built the mockup, then built two forms, one to fit inside of it and one to fit outside of it. When the casting was hard, I tore away the two styrofoam forms.

By the way, I plan to finish the dome this weekend and I'll try your "cruciform" brick configuration for the top.
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