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  #41  
Old 09-04-2006, 08:32 PM
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Default brick piers

Here's the brick piers built up to the level where the stone arch top for the wood storage area starts. You can see the slate corner stones and door bottom in this view.



Next: building the wood arch form, and cutting the slate arch elements. The slab to support the oven will be at the level of the bottom of the green window.
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  #42  
Old 09-17-2006, 08:33 AM
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Default wood bin arch


Here is the form for the arch for the wood bin door.

The arch support goes in the door opening, supported by uprights. The side walls were built up, and the edges tapered to support the side pieces of the arch.

I drew the shape of the opening on a piece of scrap plywood, and cut the slate blocks to fit the drawing.
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  #43  
Old 09-17-2006, 08:41 AM
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Default arched door


The arch blocks are random thickness slate, and the end pieces cantelever out to provide support to the oven landing shelf above.

The arch mortared in place: you will notice that the thin plywood I used sagged when it got wet: If I was going for a less rustic and more geometric look, I would not have been happy. As it is, I think it looks fine. Charm of the homemade, and all that.
I'll have to do some angle grinder trimming of the tops of the arch blocks for the slate shelf to sit flat on top of it.

Here's a view of the inside, the side walls and the arch will serve as the forms for the pour of the hearth slab.
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  #44  
Old 09-17-2006, 08:52 AM
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Thumbs up Exquisite workmanship and choice of materials!

(M) You're as much an artist as engineer. You've also been able to select just the right materials for your stand to match the period of your home's blocks. Congratulations.

(M) If you have thyme please tell us why you chose to cover part of the low window. ___ I suspect that your home may be a duplex and you had insufficient space to locate your oven to the right of that window? ___

(M) It's great that you have the discipline to cut and join every part so carefully. Keep up the superb workmanship. You should consider a career in custom made clocks.

Ciao,

Marcel
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  #45  
Old 09-17-2006, 01:31 PM
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Default The window is toast

The top edge of the blocks below the window will be a support for my hearth slab when I pour it. The window hasn't been used for years (it's been insulated and walled over). The building was built as a two car garage in the twenties of the last century, and is now is used as part of my studio. As soon as I get the support structure built on the inside, I will bust through this wall, and the hope is that i will be able to save enough of those rusticated concrete blocks to patch the rest of the window opening. The oven will be half inside and half outside the building.

The ironic thing is that when I ripped out the wall to prepare for the construction this summer, that part of the room was flooded with light from that little window in the mornings. It makes me think that I want to encorporate a window in the upper part of the structure when I get there.

Last edited by dmun; 09-17-2006 at 07:55 PM.
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  #46  
Old 09-18-2006, 10:02 AM
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Default Sweeeet!

It looks grand! I love the slate arch, it is going to look very cool Dmun. You do nice work. The blocks on the exterior of your house look like a stone veneer that should be very easy to match up. I have seen a lot of stone like that around and it looks really sweet. Nice stuff and good work lad.
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Last edited by janprimus; 09-19-2006 at 12:44 PM. Reason: grammatical and spelling
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  #47  
Old 09-25-2006, 09:13 AM
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Default Moving inside

With fall officially started, I've moved oven operations inside. The other half of my oven support structure will be on the inside, and will include a Rumford fireplace.



The floor and wall have been cut away to make room for the new structure, and two piers of concrete blocks have been built to support the hearth slab. As you can see, I'm working hard to maintain my reputation as worlds-worst-bricklayer.



The plywood template is placed where the bottom of the fireplace will go. The fireplace is offset 12 inches from the centerline of the oven, so that the fireplace vent will go through one of the corners of the circle-in-the-square oven layout.

You can see that piece of 1-1/2 inch pvc going through the bottom of the structure: That has a dual purpose. It will be an emergency flood drain to the "basement" of the oven footings where I can put a sump pump. (it goes through the exterior block wall). It will also serve as an auxiliary air intake for the fireplace.



This used up the last of my craigslist free concrete blocks, and takes me up to within four inches of the bottom of the window. I'll next put on a row of half thickness concrete blocks on the top to support the slab, but not until I finish the refractory fireplace liner.
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  #48  
Old 09-29-2006, 06:46 PM
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Default fireplace prep

Getting ready to lay the shell of the rumford fireplace. I decided to back and underline the firebox with insulating concrete, for one, to see how it works, and two, because I think it will make a more efficient rumford, which works through radiation rather than heating the air. I figure that insulated bricks will heat up more and reflect more heat, just like a well insulated oven dome. We shall see.

I started by building forms, two and three quarters thick, high enough to bring the fireplace floor level with the hardwood floor of the workshop.

Insulating concrete is wierd stuff. It has a really crumbly texture, and doesn't seem to hold together at all. It doesn't begin to "float" like regular concrete: By patting it down with the trowel after I leveled it to the forms I got somewhat dense, uniform surface. I'm going to take it on faith that this stuff will harden up to a rigid substance.

You remember all those triangles I made cutting the corners off of firebricks? You thought I was going to throw them out? Here they are, matched and mortared together ready to make a neat diamond pattern on the floor of the fireplace.
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  #49  
Old 10-01-2006, 10:52 AM
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Default Fireplace floor

I trimmed those glued triangles, and assembled them into a diamond pattern for the bottom of the fireplace:

The edges will mostly be covered by the upright walls, so I just plan to use whole firebricks there.

I was looking for a flat place to pre assemble the mosiac that wouldn't be harmed by the mortar:

I covered my granite surface plate with waxed paper and assembled it there. Although the overlap of the two layers of waxed paper means the accuracy is completly lost
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  #50  
Old 10-01-2006, 10:55 AM
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Default rumford walls

I cut the pieces for the angled walls of the rumford fireplace:

And the second layer:

The corners partially interlock.
This is repeated for the seven brick height of the firebox.
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