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  #71  
Old 10-03-2011, 07:43 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: 12 minutes from Snowbird UT
Posts: 88
Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

I think his reason was because the oven is top heavy and the slab isn't very wide, only 4-7 by 5-3. He said the slab would have to be quite a bit wider and pretty beefy to counter the force or something like that. But then, I didn't understand half of what he said.
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  #72  
Old 10-14-2011, 02:35 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: 12 minutes from Snowbird UT
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Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

After careful review of all factors and advice, I have decided to go with a slab instead of a foundation. I dug down to original soil and backfilled with fine native sand, compacting every couple of inches. On top of that I have five inches of gravel also compacted. Around this I plan to put drain pipe. There shouldn't be any frost heave on this baby (crossed fingers).

As I prepare to make my pour, I'd like a couple of you veterans to review my plans and let me know if what I'm doing makes sense. I kind of expect that this is structural overkill and if so, I'd like suggestions where I can cut back.

Be aware that I'm using 10 inch CMU because it was free.





I thought it would be helpful to post the conceptual design image for those who haven't been following this thread.




Craig

Last edited by clofgreen; 10-14-2011 at 02:42 PM.
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  #73  
Old 10-14-2011, 05:01 PM
ggoose's Avatar
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Spokane, WA
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Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

Nice...that thing looks real! I would favor placing the slab rebar in the unsupported areas (the spans), rather than where the cmu's are, as the slab will already be supported there...perhaps just add a few peices across the center span, and make sure they will be in the bottom quarter to third of the slab. Cheap insurance to prevent cracking...

Just my $0.02.

gene
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  #74  
Old 10-15-2011, 07:53 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: 12 minutes from Snowbird UT
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Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

Today was a beautiful day here in Utah and I was happy to spend some of it working on my WFO. But with grandkids visiting I kept getting distracted (but I'm not complaining. They're a lot of fun).

I brought the gravel up to finish level and compacted it good then set the forms which were taken from the deck I cut out.



I picked up 50 ft of rebar from a neighbor who had it sitting in his garage for several years. I cut it with a metal grinder wheel that I picked up at home depot that happened to fit my Makita circular sander. I bent the rebar with an old pipe that's been kicking around my shop looking for a use. It sure came in handy today. My son took my car fishing so I wasn't able to get over to HD to buy the plastic and wire mesh but as soon as I get that I think I'm ready to pour the slab. (BTW, the big chunk of concrete, most of which is buried, was just one of the treasures I found when digging the hole. I also found a conc sidewalk or patio or something a few inches beneath that. They were solid so thought I'd just leave them there.)



Here's that grinder wheel.



I'm not going to get back to this until Tuesday so if there's something anyone sees that I'm doing wrong please let me know. This is my first time doing anything like this.

Craig
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  #75  
Old 10-16-2011, 04:15 AM
david s's Avatar
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Location: Townsville, Nth Queensland,Australia
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Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

I can't see that drill lasting too much longer if you continue to use it as a grinder. Do yourself a favour and get a 4" angle grinder, they are an indispensable tool, you can cut or grind steel, concrete, wood, ceramics etc. using the appropriate discs. Keep your makita drill for drilling.
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  #76  
Old 10-16-2011, 11:44 AM
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Location: Utah
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Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

Craig,

Looks good, my slab is on about 6-7 inched of 1" rock and is 6" thick, I also have lots of rebar and 6" square mesh in the slab. It has not moved a bit.

The weather sure has been nice here, calm before a storm, probably.

Derk
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  #77  
Old 10-18-2011, 12:51 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: 12 minutes from Snowbird UT
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Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

Quote:
Originally Posted by david s View Post
I can't see that drill lasting too much longer if you continue to use it as a grinder. Do yourself a favour and get a 4" angle grinder, they are an indispensable tool, you can cut or grind steel, concrete, wood, ceramics etc. using the appropriate discs. Keep your makita drill for drilling.
I see where you are coming from, right tool for the right job, but this is a circular sander, not a drill, and is basically the same engine as an angle grinder. The metal grinder wheel is a perfect fit so I don't think there will be too much problem. Besides, we're talking a very small amount of rebar that needs cutting.
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  #78  
Old 10-18-2011, 01:05 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: 12 minutes from Snowbird UT
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Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derkp View Post
Craig,

The weather sure has been nice here, calm before a storm, probably.

Derk
Utah weather at its best! Took this off my deck just now:



Spent the morning pouring my slab. Never worked with concrete before. Actually was pretty easy. Here's a pic from my deck.



And a closeup.




Given the nice dry Utah fall weather, how often should I be spraying the slab? High today will be 63. Humidity is 35 - 40%. Winds are light. Should I cover it with some plastic?
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  #79  
Old 10-18-2011, 01:09 PM
Il Pizzaiolo
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: So. Orange County, CA. USA
Posts: 1,155
Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

Plastic is good. As I remember, the strength builds for the first 5 days or so, but you should be fine to start the stand in a week. Warmth is also a factor for proper curing.

Better info can be found here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concrete#Curing


Chris

Last edited by SCChris; 10-18-2011 at 01:15 PM.
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  #80  
Old 10-18-2011, 01:43 PM
Laborer
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: 12 minutes from Snowbird UT
Posts: 88
Default Re: Continued Design Ideas

Thanks for the advise and the link. I sprayed the concrete then covered it with plastic. I figure if I can see condensation on the plastic the moisture level should be OK. I read that spraying once a day is sufficient. Does anyone disagree? (I put soup cans over the rebar to keep from tearing the plastic.)

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