#11  
Old 09-07-2010, 09:58 AM
Master Builder
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 942
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

I don't think they meet code in my region either. The last time I built a deck I used something very similar but I had to set them by partially burying them above poured concrete footings at least 16"x16" square and something like 36" deep for each pier, but of course I set each pier further apart.
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  #12  
Old 09-07-2010, 02:55 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 346
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

Well, the deck block and it's ability is a moot point (even though I think it would work just fine) since Jamey decided to go with a block foundation.

Stacking concrete block will be very simple as many others can attest to rather than dealing with 'the block' and having to make measurements and cuts. A little trick that I heard about was to put a piece of tar paper in between the concrete blocks to stop 'walking' (block on block can have a little slide to it). Probably won't be much, but tar paper scrap can be easy to find.
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  #13  
Old 09-08-2010, 04:50 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Northeast Florida
Posts: 9
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

Trying to steer towards the wisdom of the crowd here, will be doing a concrete block build for the stand, thanks for the advice guys.

Now my remaining question is this: Is is ok to build on top of the pavers or should I go ahead and pour the slab?

I will just assume safer to pour the slab.

The local 'yard at a time' company can deliver yards or portions of yards, and for about $200 I can pull home a ready to go load of concrete and use my wheelbarrell to pour it in the forms. Costs more than bags but everyone I know says there is no other way to do it if you care about your back :-)

The instructions specify 5 1/2 inch slab to build on, is there a particular engineering reason for this? Locally (Florida) everyone does the 4 inch slabs when building houses etc.

Thanks again for all the help.

Jamey
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  #14  
Old 09-08-2010, 05:32 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 346
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

Here in MN slabs are done with 4" thick with a little more depth on the sides. Technically, all the weight is bearing on the sides (somebody built one on 3 round posts). With little chance of real freezing (at least nowhere near MN standards) I can't see why you would need deeper. The block 'stand' itself is engineering overkill, but it is simple to do.
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  #15  
Old 09-08-2010, 09:04 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: minnesota, usa
Posts: 472
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

Florida has notoriously bad soil conditions...sinkholes, anyone? And while I suspect the pompeii stand instructions have been written with best guess engineering for worst case, I think it's ridiculous to try and save $50 on a foundation slab by pouring 4" instead of 5.5 or 6" when your entire structure depends on its soundness.

As important as the concrete thickness is the rebar schedule.
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  #16  
Old 09-08-2010, 09:32 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 346
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

Hmmmm... tell us how you really feel! I'm willing to look at options of saving money. Even with your statements I don't think it's necessary for the extra concrete. If 4" is good enough to hold a car, it certainly is good enough for an oven. I will agree that rebar needs to be present... yet there can be a certain point where there is too much rebar and not enough concrete.
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  #17  
Old 09-08-2010, 09:55 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Northeast Florida
Posts: 9
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

My house is on a 4" slab, as I said, it's customary here. A sinkhole would be an entirely different problem :-)
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  #18  
Old 09-08-2010, 10:07 AM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: minnesota, usa
Posts: 472
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

If you want to see what 4" of reinforced concrete that holds up cars on bad soil looks like after 5 years, come on over. It's a lot like my 4" of reinforced concrete on bad soil that's holding up patio furniture which is to say intact but only thanks to rebar.
And if you're curious to see the amazing potential of frost heave, come on over about January.
Granted this is MN, not FL, but given the overall cost and time involved in a WFO build, $50 is a drop in the bucket. Of course that's just my opinion.

Relative to the model and make of the car of course, IIRC a completed oven and average enclosure equals about 2x the psf load of a vehicle.

There are plenty of places to save a few bucks on a build. A foundation wouldn't be my first choice.
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  #19  
Old 09-08-2010, 10:19 AM
Serf
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Northeast Florida
Posts: 9
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

Your concern seems well founded, sorry to hear that about your patio!
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  #20  
Old 09-08-2010, 04:20 PM
Journeyman
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: MN, USA
Posts: 346
Default Re: Considering a Pompeii, would the Cucina stand work?

Quote:
Originally Posted by splatgirl View Post
If you want to see what 4" of reinforced concrete that holds up cars on bad soil looks like after 5 years, come on over. It's a lot like my 4" of reinforced concrete on bad soil that's holding up patio furniture which is to say intact but only thanks to rebar.
Minnesota is hard on everything, however it seems you have isolated the problem to bad soil, not the concrete. So, it would seem your statement would be: make sure the base (what the concrete sits on) is solid. That is indeed good info for everyone.
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