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  #31  
Old 07-14-2010, 04:29 PM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

OOO OOOo oo I have a question ... You created the arches seperate from the dome? Can you explain that a little better?

Did you also use 1/3 bricks for the whole dome? Forgive me if you state that somewhere. I am still reading the thread.

Did you cut all sides of the bricks to get that fit? How many total bricks did you use?

What mortar did you use?
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Last edited by MetalHead; 07-14-2010 at 04:32 PM.
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  #32  
Old 07-16-2010, 08:20 AM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

Here is an image of the brick I cut for the heat break between the entry and the inner dome arch. I left a 0.25 inch edge to contact the inner arch. I didn't use any morter at this junction, so the brick just sits up against the bricks of the inner dome arch. When you look through the entry, it just looks like the dome and entry are connected, but since there is no mortar and only 0.25 inches of contact (very little actual contact even on the 0.25 in.--mostly air), there is very little heat transfer across the junction. I considered using some kind of high temperature sealer at the junction, but opted for simply relying on the insulation packed in the 0.75" space to keep any smoke from getting between the dome and entry. It worked perfectly.

I had two thoughts behind this approach. First, I have seen examples of cracks in the dome continuing all the way throught the entry to the very outer arch. Isolating the entry this way completely eliminated that possibility. Along with this, the dome and the entry are subjected to very different thermal stresses, so it made sense to me to isolate them from one another.

Second, I went to a lot of trouble to insulate the dome above and below, so I didn't like the idea of this thermal "weak link" where heat could easily drain off the dome to the esposed bricks of the entry.

I can't remember what kind of thermal performance people are getting with their ovens, but I typically fire to pizza temps one evening and it is 500F in 24 hrs., 400F in 48 hrs, 300F in 72 hrs, etc. That's with a temporary wooden door that I can't put on until the oven has cooled significantly. When I get a proper door made, I expect better residual heat retention.

I used HeatStop 50 for mortar. I started with the Italian imported mortar, but with the precision fit, compound cut approach I was after, it wouldn't work in my hands. The HeatStop worked much better for the thin joints in my build. I can't remember now the exact amount, but I think I only used a few bags of the mortar for the entire build. That being said, I'm sure what I saved buying mortar, I spent on diamond blades.

I started with 1/3 bricks and by the time I was at the highest rows I was using 1/4 bricks. Each piece of brick had 2 compound cuts, so the faces on the inside and the outside of the dome were factory, uncut faces. The only exception to this was on the inside of the inner dome arch where there are a couple of small cut faces exposed on the inside of the oven.

I can't remember the total brick count.

I hope that helps. Let me know if I can explain anything better.

Mark
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Colorado oven-vent.jpg   Colorado oven-heat_break_brick_02.jpg   Colorado oven-archinside.jpg  
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  #33  
Old 07-16-2010, 06:41 PM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

So when you say two compound cuts you mean the sides correct? So no bevel cuts were made on the top and bottom of each brick?
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  #34  
Old 07-17-2010, 05:53 AM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

Sorry. I made a compound cut on each side and also angled the top and bottom of each brick.

Mark
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  #35  
Old 07-17-2010, 06:01 AM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

Amazing. where do I find pictures of the rest of the build?
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  #36  
Old 07-17-2010, 06:10 AM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

Cool. I was on this line of thinking also. What size saw did you use? 10 inch?
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  #37  
Old 07-17-2010, 09:09 AM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

WCD,

I am working on more of the kitchen around the oven now. I'll try to post some additional photos soon. I did a poor job of documenting every step photographically (unlike many on this forum).

MH,

I did use a 10" HF saw.

Mark
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  #38  
Old 07-17-2010, 11:11 AM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

Thanks for the inspiration and answers Mark. I just set my 2nd arch, and followed your approach. The arch bricks are 'L' shaped, with only about an inch at the bottom touching the inner arch.

I tried to grind away some of the connecting brick between the dome and the vent walls with a grinder, with limited success. I suppose that every bit of that thermal leak that is removed will help.

Cheers!
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  #39  
Old 07-17-2010, 04:12 PM
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
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Default Re: Colorado oven

Hey,
Thanks for this post. I was about to post a question on creating a thermal break between the dome and vent, and all has been explained here. Great stuff.

What is a "luan" jig?
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  #40  
Old 07-18-2010, 06:48 AM
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Default Re: Colorado oven

Very nice Mark

Just came across your build and am very impressed. Looking forward to the rest of your build

cheers
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