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oggi 07-30-2011 07:35 PM

Chuck's oven underway NY
 
Hello everyone
After two month's of reading postings, studying photos and contemplating design as well as building a retaining wall and patio. I am now ready to start the oven construction. I have one question before I start cutting my brick for the dome of the oven.
As I was about to buy some firebrick from my local lumber yard. I found a posting on craigslist for a pallet of refractory brick at $200. I now have enough bricks to build my woodfired oven and a small potter kiln. These bricks are roughly 8in by 8in by 3 1/2 in to 3 5/16 ths . They are very dense high duty firebricks manufactured in Spain and intended for a large kiln. I purchased them from a warehouse that got stuck with them.
The information in the fornobravo pdf's suggests that high duty bricks may get too hot.
My question is ,
Should I adjust the thickness of my dome to correct for this?
Can this be corrected for by simply making a smaller fire if I want to roast?

I am insulating with the insulation available from Forno Bravo 2in of blacket above and two inches of board below. I will have an additional 1 to 3 inches of the perlite concrete mix incaseing that with loose perlite above.
Cheers

Lburou 08-09-2011 09:39 PM

Re: Chuck's oven underway NY
 
Congrats on the firebrick deal! :)

Its my impression that those bricks will be the same temperature as any other brick in one of these ovens, even though your bricks could tolerate a much higher temperature than most of our bricks of lower density/duty.

Your bricks might be a bit more difficult to cut, but you can tolerate some additional difficulty at the price you paid :brickpriceenvy: ;)

I would recommend going strictly by the fornobravo plans, thereby keeping the thermal mass to proven thickness. Your insulation plan seems spot on.

Regards :)

brickie in oz 08-09-2011 10:15 PM

Re: Chuck's oven underway NY
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by oggi (Post 118161)
suggests that high duty bricks may get too hot.

So make the fires smaller. :rolleyes:
Heat in = heat out.

Edit: The duty of the brick is for wear resistance, although a denser brick will take longer to heat. (see above)

oggi 08-10-2011 05:48 PM

Re: Chuck's oven underway NY
 
Thanks for the replies guys, I did not think it would be a big deal, but wanted to ask since this forum is such a great resource. I am staying as close as I can to the plans.

I am a builder by trade and have a solid professional 8in tile saw so cutting the harder brick is not a big deal.
The concrete work is easy for me as well as I own a cement mixer.

oggi 08-10-2011 06:03 PM

Re: Chuck's oven underway NY
 
Next question.. Thermocouples

I am thinking of installing thermocouples in the oven. Initially I was going to leave out this feature. But after finding a multimeter that had the range to measure temps in a pottery kiln (The next project I am planning, with the excess discounted bricks) I decided to kill two birds with stone and install some thermocouples.

I am wondering were the best locations would be.

I thought I would put one under the center of the oven about 3/4 of an inch from the surface and thereby have a temp right at the contact area for cooking.

Would it be useful to place them in other locations as well?

Hank10746 08-10-2011 06:38 PM

Re: Chuck's oven underway NY
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by oggi (Post 118161)
Hello everyone
After two month's of reading postings, studying photos and contemplating design as well as building a retaining wall and patio. I am now ready to start the oven construction. I have one question before I start cutting my brick for the dome of the oven.
As I was about to buy some firebrick from my local lumber yard. I found a posting on craigslist for a pallet of refractory brick at $200. I now have enough bricks to build my woodfired oven and a small potter kiln. These bricks are roughly 8in by 8in by 3 1/2 in to 3 5/16 ths . They are very dense high duty firebricks manufactured in Spain and intended for a large kiln. I purchased them from a warehouse that got stuck with them.
The information in the fornobravo pdf's suggests that high duty bricks may get too hot.
My question is ,
Should I adjust the thickness of my dome to correct for this?
Can this be corrected for by simply making a smaller fire if I want to roast?

I am insulating with the insulation available from Forno Bravo 2in of blacket above and two inches of board below. I will have an additional 1 to 3 inches of the perlite concrete mix incaseing that with loose perlite above.
Cheers

Hi
A quick thought. Your bricks are 1 inch shorter then the standard brick used so after cutting you would have 1/2 inch less mass on each side than the original brick. But all you would have to do if it matters any is put a little more than a skim coat on it using a high heat concrete mix. Not sure it really matters if insulated properly like you are.
Hank10746

Aegis 08-11-2011 02:54 AM

Re: Chuck's oven underway NY
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by oggi (Post 118845)
Next question.. Thermocouples

I am thinking of installing thermocouples in the oven. Initially I was going to leave out this feature. But after finding a multimeter that had the range to measure temps in a pottery kiln (The next project I am planning, with the excess discounted bricks) I decided to kill two birds with stone and install some thermocouples.

I am wondering were the best locations would be.

I thought I would put one under the center of the oven about 3/4 of an inch from the surface and thereby have a temp right at the contact area for cooking.

Would it be useful to place them in other locations as well?

I placed one in that same spot for the same reason you did, floor temp. Then I put one under it, between the hearth brick and insulating layer, to know when the floor was heat saturated.(Heated all the way through to the outside) I did the same near the top of the dome, one inside a brick about 3/4" from the inside of the inside surface of the dome and one on top of it for the same heat soak knowledge. Of course I didn't stop there but you probably wouldn't need anymore than those that I described.
Good Luck
John


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