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-   -   Chimney question and Misc (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/chimney-question-misc-4349.html)

spbarr 06-21-2008 09:42 PM

Chimney question and Misc
 
1. I noticed most people use the chimney kit and do not build it out of bricks. Is there anything wrong with building it out of bricks? Also do I need to have some type of insert inside the brick frame? I have seen some posts discussing weight issues, but if I build it up enough should it work ok?

2. Also now that my oven is getting closer to being complete, is there special wood that I should use when curing what about cooking? Also does anyone have a step by step guide to cook with the oven?. I am not clear on the procedure.

I think its:
Build fire
Wait 1 hour
move fire to the side
add pizza?

3. I noticed everyone makes their own dough is this required? I would like to make my own dough but I am a true novice.

Thank you!
-Sean

dmun 06-22-2008 03:37 AM

Re: Chimney question and Misc
 
I love masonry chimneys. They are beautiful, they are affordable, and they last forever. Here's how it works: You build up the top of your entry into sort of an inverted funnel, until you get it down to the size of your flue tile, usually 8 x 8 inches. You then set your flue tile in a bead of refractory mortar on top of your entry.

Then you build up your exterior brick structure. You want it built down on the sides so it's supported from your slab in one way or another. You will have some kind of an arch in front, usually decorative, although you could use a metal sill or angle iron to support it, and in the back as well, as you don't want to pile all that chimney weight on the dome.

According to code, the brick chimneys are built up free of the flue tile for it's full height, and the flue tile is held in place with a stone or brick collar at the top, with flashing to create a slip plane between the chimney and the flue.

nissanneill 06-22-2008 05:33 AM

Re: Chimney question and Misc
 
Hi Sean
Quote:

Originally Posted by spbarr (Post 35553)
1.
I think its:
Build fire
Wait 1 hour
move fire to the side
add pizza?

After you have dried and cured your oven (a week of fires ranging from a small paper and kindling wood increasing the temperature by 100˚F each time/day until you get it up to around 800-900˚F), you will realise that getting your fire going and going well, is not as simple as you might think. I suggest that you get some sctap steel or even offcuts or firbrick to rest your wood on so as that it can get a good supply of air. You will need to tend your fire often as it will burn probably a reasonable wheelbarrow of split hardwood per firing.
It would be a small oven that heats up, let alone have good heat soak into the dome and floor, in an hour. More like 2 - 2.5 hrs of effort and until the inside of your dome goes white rather than the black soot, then it is time to push the fire aside, sweep the hearth and cook you pizzas. You will need to move your coals around to heat up your hearth as well during the fire-up process.
Just learning how to prepare your pizza, slide it into the oven on the hearth is not as easy as it sounds. A real experience awaits you.
Good luck anyway with your first cook-up.

Neill

Ed_ 06-22-2008 08:48 AM

Re: Chimney question and Misc
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by dmun (Post 35555)
I love masonry chimneys. They are beautiful, they are affordable, and they last forever. Here's how it works: You build up the top of your entry into sort of an inverted funnel, until you get it down to the size of your flue tile, usually 8 x 8 inches. You then set your flue tile in a bead of refractory mortar on top of your entry.

I know a lot of conversation has been devoted to how to make this chimney transition, but I wonder if you or someone else could comment with regard to one particular issue--namely the buildup of soot that seems to appear on the outer arch of some (but by no means all) ovens.

My initial impression was that draw would be improved by having the inner arch be slightly taller than the outer. I've since learned (from this forum) about the role of chimney height in improving draw. Other posts have pointed out that reducing turbulent airflow is also important. What, in your opinion, are the major factors that help the chimney draw well enough to prevent soot buildup on the outside?

asudavew 06-22-2008 09:50 AM

Re: Chimney question and Misc
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ed_ (Post 35572)
What, in your opinion, are the major factors that help the chimney draw well enough to prevent soot buildup on the outside?

I've got soot.

Me likes it! Makes my oven look well used, which it is.... :D


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