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-   -   chicken wire options? (http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/chicken-wire-options-3669.html)

Xabia Jim 03-31-2008 12:24 AM

chicken wire options?
 
This excerpt is from Wickipedia when I was researching a stronger cement........There are at least two reasons why sculptors and builders who build for the long term avoid zinc coated wire such as poultry netting. 1) Galvanized steel used for animal cages is not required to be high quality steel. 2) Zinc is similar to copper chemically; it disolves slowly in the concrete matrix. Ferrocement artifacts utilizing zinc within the concrete matrix are only acceptable for the short time horizon of modern buildings or boat hulls. Sculptors and builders who build for a future of many centuries use uncoated high quality steel. A small quantity of galvanized wire is not harmful as the outer armature layer to hold fresh plaster in place.

page link Ferrocement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

any comments? where do you find high quality uncoated steel?

Frances 03-31-2008 02:00 AM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
Yep I read that, too, and had the same question. I've never seen ungalvanised chicken wire...

Its also the first time I heard of chicken wire disovling in concrete, although I have read a bit about ferrocement. ...Wikipedia has been known to be wrong, so has anyone heard about this from other sources at all?

Frances 04-01-2008 06:30 AM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
I checked the DIY today and noticed they also have plastic coated chicken wire. Presumably without zink.

So Jim, - seeing as no one else is very fascinated with the Ferrocement question - do you think that would be better for non-heat exposed constructions? The plastic would keep the wire from rusting within the cement, too.

Of course one way to find out would be to build something with each kind of chicken wire, and wait for a couple of centuries to see which lasts longer... :)

david s 04-01-2008 06:44 AM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
Any time you have heat involved you hasten chemical reaction. You should see how long any steel doesn't last, unless it's stainless, in any kiln. Normal reo steel in concrete is not subjected to the sort of temps we're exposing it to. But I for one can't afford to use ss chikenwire even if I could find any.

Frances 04-01-2008 06:58 AM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
Well, that's just the point isn't it? If you're looking for an afordable and easily available product to make strong ferrocement structures, what would best?

...beside non-existent and expensive stainless steel chicken wire?

david s 04-12-2008 03:44 PM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
There is a product available in Australia called Fibrecrete, which contains reinforcing fibres. It's incredibly strong apparently. I'm seriously considering usng it on my next oven. It would save a lot of labour not having to do the chicken wire.I'll check it out and report back.

david s 05-18-2008 06:02 AM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
Just finished my daughters oven using fibre in the outer render mix instead of chicken wire. It was more difficult to apply because it didn't have the chicken wire to grab onto, but as soon as I got about 6 inches up where it starts to slope in, it was much easier. It really holds the mix together. A blob just hangs off the trowel. If it doesn't work and the shell cracks, I'll have to attack it with another layer using chicken wire. This outer shell is only 10mm thick.

PizzaJNKY 05-18-2008 08:13 AM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
I was planning on using chicken wire to cover the FB blanket. Hoping the perlite/mortar mixture would have something to grab on to. For this application, would it really matter if the chicken wire disolves later on down the road?

Ken524 05-18-2008 10:02 AM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PizzaJNKY (Post 32752)
For this application, would it really matter if the chicken wire disolves later on down the road?

I doubt it. By the time it dissolves (if ever), the cement will have long been cured and the oven will be finished out and protected from the elements.

gjbingham 05-18-2008 11:31 PM

Re: chicken wire options?
 
I concur. Shouldn't be a problem.


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